2014 Craftsmanship Awards Winners


A next to the project name indicates that the project was nominated for the special Star Award

Concrete

Cast-in-Place Concrete

(including formwork & reinforcement)

Bernabe Diaz, Amado Martinez, Pablo Ocampo, Ramon Rivera, Harold Rommel, Mauricio Villanueva - Clark Concrete Contractors

Project Name: 1812 North Moore Street, Arlington, VA
Architect:  Davis Carter Scott, Ltd.
Engineer:  KCE Structural Engineers
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
Clark Concrete poured concrete for over 87 weeks. Completing the concrete work was a challenging endeavor that required intensive structural details and close coordination with other trades on-site. The shear wall cores were vast and began from foundation excavated in rock all the way to the 35th floor. At the building's 12th level, the slabs are mild steel two-way flat slabs with un-bonded PT beams. A self-climbing wall framing system (using hydraulics) was utilized to allow the crane to place concrete and move framing materials around the project. Clark Concrete was responsible for interfacing structural steel with concrete in many locations.

Timmy Ball, Jim Benya, Bradley Cook, Cesar Hernandez, Roger Kreitzburg, Jose Luis Lopez - SMC Concrete Construction, Inc.

Project Name: 1700 New York Avenue, Washington, DC
Architect:  SmithGroupJJR
Civil Engineer:  Wiles Mensch Corporation
Mechanical Engineer: Girard Engineering, PC
Structural Engineer: SK&A Structural Engineers, PLLC
General Contractor:  Balfour Beatty Construction
Although the building is relatively small, the project was difficult due to the adjacency to the historic Corcoran Gallery of Art and the United Unions Building. Construction on the project was only accessible from the north side of the building along New York Avenue. The 15-foot cantilevers at the perimeter of the building required a considerable amount of post-tension cabling. The height of the new building exceeds the height of the adjacent Corcoran Gallery at the sixth floor, providing a striking architectural visual. Due to the size of the cantilever and the loads imposed during the slab pour, the engineered truss required for shoring extended into the building the same distance it had to extend out over the Corcoran.

Jamie Cable, Elimele Lopez, Scott Holtzman, Juan Miranda, Ben Serrano, Wilfredo Vasquez - BARR Concrete

Project Name: George Washington University School of Public Health, Washington, DC
Architect:  Payette Associates Inc.
Engineer:  Tadjer Cohen Edelson & Associates
General Contractor:  The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
The concrete structure contains very intricate and complicated slab edge opening details. Exposed concrete work is found throughout the building. Some of the neat features worthy of highlighting on this project include bamboo wood surrounds, terracotta and glass unitized curtain wall panels, deliberately mis-aligned terrazzo and glass floating stair stingers, and a highly sophisticated chilled beam mechanical system. The concrete structure of the building speaks volumes on the design vision and location of this building, which capitalizes on a multitude of angles, curves, and exposed concrete. These features are in sync with the values of the institution and the culture of this vibrant city where people from all angles convene to share their views and expose their talents all for a better educational future.

Dionisio Castro-Aguillar, Kevin James Augustine, Rosorio Bonilla, Mauricio Martinez, Freddy Reyes, Fausto Solorzano - Miller and Long Co., Inc.

Project Name: Marriott Marquis,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Cooper Carry
Engineer:  A+F Engineers with Thornton Tomasetti
General Contractor:  Hensel Phelps
Each floor consisted of 10 pours up to the 15th floor, where Miller & Long went to nine pours. Concrete was serviced by three tower cranes and extensive usage of concrete pumps. Miller & Long started on the first floor- slab on metal deck supported by structural steel. This, combined with large mechanical openings, meant that this floor could not be relied upon to support framing of the cast-in-place levels above. In order to overcome this, large structural steel members- some as large as 60 feet long and 3 feet tall were set up across the first floor to bridge the openings and support the first lift of high shoring. As could be imagined, removal of such members after re-shore removal was a massive effort.
Star Award Nominee

Santo Alberto, Daniel Chavez, Carlos Hernandez, Justo Posadas, Joe Satkin, Arritt Wheeler - Hensel Phelps

Project Name: Marriott Marquis,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Cooper Carry
Engineer:  Thornton Tomasetti
General Contractor:  Hensel Phelps
Once the structural elements for top-down construction are completed, the process of excavation is started. The excavation cycle is punctuated by the placement of rat slabs, which provide the finish on the underside of the structural slab, followed by the excavation of the soil underneath the rat slab and the demo of the rat slab. This process is repeated and the structure moves its way down to the final elevation. A Werres forklift was modified to accept a custom made fork attachment, which allowed a full height section of the column framework to be moved from column to column. The placements were made utilizing a smaller concrete bucket on a skidsteer and the digging holes or a trailer pump and slickline.

Doors and Windows

Curtain Walls

Trevor Morrison, Joel Schweitzer - Harmon, Inc.

Project Name: The Aerospace Corporation - Phase 1,  Chantilly, VA
Architect:  KGD Architecture
General Contractor:  DAVIS Construction Corporation
Faced with project challenges, Harmon tailored a custom curtain wall system to meet these demands. Due to the nature of the tenant fit out, an emphasis was put on getting the building weather tight as quickly as possible; and the decision was made to utilize a two-story unit approach. The curtain wall was fabricated, assembled, and glazed at Harmon's Baltimore production facility which made the two-story unit approach effective logistically. The majority of the dyes were designed specifically for the project, and a visual/performance mock-up was constructed at Harmon's Baltimore facility to ensure that KGD's aesthetic vision was maintained while setting the quality control benchmark for the product phase, critical in maintain the level of quality demanded by the team.

Local 5 Iron Workers, Local 963 Glaziers - Permasteelisa North America Corporation

Project Name: 1812 North Moore Street,  Arlington, VA
Architect:  Davis Carter Scott, Ltd.
Engineer:  KCE Structural Engineers
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
The project is designed to achieve LEED Core & Shell Platinum certification and LEED Neighborhood Development Gold certification-making it one of the largest commercial green buildings in Virginia. 1812 North Moore's approximately 225,000 square feet of unitized curtain wall, utilizing various glass types, gives the building a distinct architectural appearance. The façade also includes architectural metal and glass handrails, pyramid truss cladding, roof lattice work, sloped glazing, skylights, and metal panels. The storefront system on levels 34 and 35 incorporates extruded aluminum corrugated rainscreen panels, and a formed aluminum gutter system.

Shawn Grundy, Joe Higgs, Jermaine Hunter - Harmon, Inc.

Project Name: U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters,  Washington, DC
Architect:  WDG Architecture, PLLC
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
The headquarters is situated on a sloping hillside with only two of the levels located entirely above-grade. Its positioning created logistical challenges for a number of trades- especially for the exterior curtain wall and strip windows subcontractor, Harmon. Harmon's field team created a plan to install the curtain wall and windows from the building's interior. In addition, the curtain wall and strip windows' design required the units be constructed and shop glazed prior to installation. Therefore, Harmon placed the pre-glazed units inside the facility and then manipulated them to locate the bunked units on each floor.

Ray Davis, Terrance Johns, Yoland LeBlanc, Chuck Swett, Doug Thorburn, Joe Walker - Ferguson Neudorf Glass

Project Name: 1700 New York Avenue,  Washington, DC
Architect:  SmithGroupJJR
Civil Engineer:  Wiles Mensch Corporation
Mechanical Engineer: Girard Engineering, PC
Structural Engineer: SK&A Structural Engineers, PLLC
General Contractor:  Balfour Beatty Construction
Ferguson Neudorf's engineering team was able to design a system that met the architect's vision for the building. The curtain wall panels are constructed of a less conventional 10-foot wide insulated glass unit to provide the offices within the building the ability to have some of the best unobstructed views of Washington, D.C.'s landmarks. The reflective glass curtain wall system is striking to pedestrians and onlookers on New York Avenue and adjacent streets; however, the complexity of the manufacturing process is hidden behind the aluminum mullions. Setbacks in the vertical plane of the façade, tabs for installation of vertical and horizontal sunshades, and wind bracing are just a few examples of items that differed from panel to panel.

Walter Alvarado, Jayson Chilcoat, Alvin (Chip) Kerlin, Richard Labore, Tony Messer, Greg Stull - Galaxy Glass & Aluminum, Inc.

Project Name: Arlington Mill Community Center,  Arlington, VA
Architect:  Davis Carter Scott, Ltd.
General Contractor:  HITT Contracting Inc.
The curtain wall on this project was installed with exacting precision and attention to detail. The overall design of the main lobby canted curtain wall provides a unique look to the plaza entrance. This canted design built around a storefront vestibule and tying into a radius wall combined to make a difficult installation. Galaxy Glass executed the installation safely with a focus on a quality finished product. The AMCC project has submitted for USGBC LEED Gold.

Claude Brooks, James Butler, Doimedes Carceres, Scott Curtin, Michael Pray, Tim Johnson - Pioneer Cladding & Glazing, LLC

Project Name: 1400 Crystal Drive,  Arlington, VA
Architect:  FOX Architects, LLC
General Contractor:  The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
1400 Crystal Drive project is a curtain wall design assist office renovation of a 40-year-old concrete structure containing a mixture of both button-head and mono-strand post tensioned cable systems in the heart of Crystal City. Along with the installation of the curtain wall was a fly-by decorative unit which was two stainless steel tubes going up the façade of the building from the second floor to penthouse. One of the largest obstacles to overcome was the installation of curtain wall system on an old concrete structure. Survey results completed showed the slab edges varied as much as 4 inches per floor and that the existing floors were not located as shown in the existing as-built and architectural drawings. Pioneer designed an anchoring system that allowed for variances with the vertical and the horizontal.

Windows and Storefronts

(including glass, glazing & skylights)

Walter Alvarado, Jayson Chilcoat, Alvin (Chip) Kerlin, Richard Labore, Tony Messer, Greg Stull - Galaxy Glass & Aluminum, Inc.

Project Name: Arlington Mill Community Center,  Arlington, VA
Architect:  Davis Carter Scott, Ltd.
General Contractor:  HITT Contracting Inc.
The exterior windows on this project are installed with quality and detail. The integration of the windows with the architectural sunshades is seamless. The alignment of the windows with the exterior panel system was executed with exacting precision. Finally, the most important aspect of a window system is that the project has had zero warranty issues with water infiltration. The method of installation and the follow through by Galaxy Glass made for the smoothest project possible, with a demonstrably quality finished product. The project has been submitted for USGBC LEED Gold.

Simon Cook, Christian Kelleher, Greg Ogara, Meesac Ruiz, Hector Sorto, Darrel Vaughn - The Craftsmen Group, Inc.

Project Name: Maret School Summer Renovation,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Cox Graae + Spack Architects
General Contractor:  SIGAL Construction Corporation
The intent of this work was not only to restore the operability of the windows in this building, but also to enhance performance while maintaining the look and function of the original units. In order to realize the significant performance gains that were targeted through this work, Low-E glass was retrofitted into the restored units and all of the windows received state of the art 1890s interlocking zinc weather stripping. All sashes were removed from the jams and restored or replaced with sapele mahogany; as were the muntins, which were replicated using the oldest existing muntin profile in the building from the late 19th century. The functionality of the units was completely restored through repairs and additions of the existing weight and pulley system.

Charles Briggs, Gregor Lorkowski, Joseph Makhlouf, Michael McDonough, Elie Wehbe, Matthew Zeitler - J & R Lamb Studios, Inc.

Project Name: Dahlgren Chapel Interior Renovation - Georgetown University,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Martin Reddy Architects
General Contractor:  Manhattan Construction Company
Dahlgren Chapel was constructed in 1893 and was the sixth building ever built on the campus of Georgetown University. The age of the chapel and structural settlement had led to major damage to the stained glass windows. For this reason, it was necessary to remove the original stained glass windows and transport them to an art studio approximately 350 miles away from the project. The process started with a detailed documentation of the existing conditions including photographs, sketches, and cataloging of each window opening and each individual stained glass piece. Following the removal of the windows it was necessary to provide scrim replicas to provide the appearance that the windows were still in place.

Electrical

Lighting Systems

Sean Easterlin, Kenneth Fowler, Russell Sullivan — Mona Electric Group, Inc.

Project Name: University of Maryland - Physical Science Complex,  College Park, MD
Architect/Engineer:  HDR CUH2A, Inc.
General Contractor:  Gilbane Building Company
This facility has over 3,600 total fixtures ranging from cable suspended linear fixtures of various lengths, stem supported fixtures, down lights, in ground up lights and pole lights. There are multiple levels of lighting control from individual conference rooms dimming systems to numerous relay lighting control panels on all floors that are integrated into the building BAS system. There are also over 250 points of control from occupancy sensors to low voltage switches. One of the challenges was the installation of the pendant lighting around the center glass feature. Each individual fixture had to be oriented and supported in such a way that the fixture lined up with the mullion on the curved wall of the glass feature.

David Bastain, Shawn Gibson, James Alex O’Donnell, Martin O’Neil, Donte Randall, William Smith — J.E. Richards, Inc.

Project Name: The Capella Hotel,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Michael Winstanley Architects & Partners
Engineer:  Thompson Co. Consulting Engineers
General Contractor:  HITT Contracting Inc.
The difficultly in the construction of this luxury hotel located centrally in Georgetown was the lighting and associated systems. Over 6,000 light fixtures including 30 different types, and four miles of LED strip lighting were installed. Even more challenging was the fact that the entire light fixture package was owner furnished, with very little detail regarding each type prior to their arrival on site. The lighting layout for the entire project was detailed to 1/8 inch, and the bulk of the lights were installed in either millwork from Germany, or various custom stones from all parts of the world which made careful coordination with other trades a must. The four miles of LED strip lighting were installed throughout the entire hotel.
Star Award Winner for Excellence in the Face of Adversity

Brooks McClain, Stephen Rivera, Joseph Waldridge, II — J.E. Richards, Inc.

Project Name: Nuclean Energy Institute,  Washington, DC
Architect:  FOX Architects, LLC
Engineer:  Greenman-Pedersen, Inc. (GPI)
General Contractor:  DAVIS Construction Corporation
The project posed many challenges including coordination of systems for available ceiling space, a new stairway that was cut into the existing structure between the 10th and 12th floors, and the high end lighting package that was associated with all of the public areas. The stairway lighting features custom LED pendants—one for each level hanging from the top ceiling at the 12th floor to each of the floors below. There are ten conferences rooms with dimming that are integrated with the AV system in each room. Three of the conference rooms on the 11th floor can be combined into one large conference room where the lighting controls adapt from three systems to one along with the AV systems. The building was fully occupied during construction. Construction noise, material distribution and debris removal were all part of the overall challenge of renovating this impressive space on time.

Power Generation, Distribution and Switchgear

Tim Armstrong, Frank Fisher, Gary Good, Lazar Koytchev, Tony Natoli, Mike Schenk — Truland Systems Corporation

Project Name: FDA at White Oak Cogeneration Plant,  Silver Spring, MD
Architect:  HGA Architects and Engineers
Engineer:  H&A Architects & Engineers
General Contractor:  Engineered Systems Alliance, LLC
Truland served as the electrical contractor for the new construction of the Central Utility Plant for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Federal Research Center. The central utility plant meets the heating, cooling, and energy requirements of a 1.2 million square-foot expansion for the FDA’s Center for Biological Evaluation and Research. The new central plant will be integrated with the existing plant at White Oak, optimizing the efficient delivery of utilities to the entire campus, and strengthening energy security by reducing reliance on the traditional electrical grid. By leveraging the plant’s on-site generation capabilities, the government can avoid utility costs and generate revenue through incentives.

Scott Blau, Jimmy Koutoulakos, Jacob Manoogian, Brandon Rector, Justin Tomlinson, Craig Wood — The Truland Group, Inc.

Project Name: GW Ross Hall,  Washington, DC
Architects:  Cannon Design / Ballinger
Engineers :  AEI / Ballinger
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
Truland performed the electrical construction for floors five and six of Ross Hall on the main campus of George Washington University. This is the first of a two-phase effort to convert four floors of the building into National Institutes of Health (NIH)-compliant research space to support grant-funded research for the Research Center for Neglected Disease of Poverty. The initial two floor renovation includes major infrastructure upgrades required to achieve the 20 percent spare capacity, frequent air changes, and emergency power prescribed in the NIH Design Requirements Manual. Specific scope items include replacement of generators and paralleling switchgear, fit out of a new collaborative laboratory space, and electrical connections for mechanical systems within new cooling towers.

Leo Cook, John Legan, Bobby McCarthy, Steve Ogle — Power Services, Inc.

Project Name: PBS Satellite Operations Center I Expansion,  Alexandria, VA
Architect:  Bloomfield Assocaites
Engineer:  Z&F Consulting
General Contractor:  HITT Contracting Inc.
In a project described by PBS as “fixing the wing of an airplane while in flight,” HITT Contracting’s Technology Sector oversaw the transition of their main broadcast/data center facility from an existing 208/120V service to a new 1600A 480/277V service. The electrical work in the project had to be installed and commissioned without any interruptions to the daily 24/7 broadcasting operations of the facility. During construction three existing generators and the existing fuel system were demolished in synchronized phases as the new equipment was brought online. Specific phasing challenges included re-feeding PBS’ existing two 500kVA UPS systems on the new power distribution gear and individually re-feeding 17 225A wall-mounted distribution panels powering the data center load.

Isiah Brown, William Bruce, Timmy Burke — Mona Electric Group, Inc.

Project Name: University of Maryland - Physical Science Complex,  College Park, MD
Architect/Engineer:  HDR CUH2A, Inc.
General Contractor:  Gilbane Building Company
For the early phase in the project, Mona had to rework and relocate numerous utilities that ran across the existing parking lot that this building would eventually occupy. The biggest being the main switchgear room for the SCUB building that is next to the project. This included reworking and installing a new service on the other side of the building. All this early work was accomplished in approximately 90 days. In general, all of the power services for this new building, including generator and UPS power, comes in through the SCUB building and is run either underground or exposed overhead. Each lab had a dedicated panel board and most have a dedicated 100 amp disconnect for experiments.

John Gianotti, Russell Gribble, Allan Harrison, Jerry Pone — VarcoMac Electrical Construction Co.

Project Name: Information Technology Operations Center - Infrastructure Upgrade,  Silver Spring, MD
Engineer:  Johnson, Mirmiran & Thompson
General Contractor:  Plano-Coudon Construction
The work consisted of improvements to and expansion of electrical systems and HVAC systems serving the ITOC as well as replacement and expansion of the building’s emergency generator plant while maintain a 24 hour operation to the ITOC. Work consisted of: adding a new 500KVA UPS and expanding the existing UPS module, adding two new 600KW bi-duel generators, expanding switchboards, adding three 1600 amp switchboards, adding two 1600 amp automatic transfer switches, adding 20 new 300KVA PDUs and six new 225 amp floor distribution cabinets in the ITOC, reconfiguring power service to all live racks, new monitoring and control systems, and relocation of the fire pump disconnect.

Rob Adair, Derek Clark, David Kaplan, Robert Kaplan, Brian LaChance, Nate Martin — VarcoMac Electrical Construction Co.

Project Name: Confidential Client Data Center,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, LLP
Engineer:  WSP Flack & Kurtz
General Contractor:  Turner Construction Company
The Confidential Client Data Center is the renovation of an existing space to relocate an existing data center within the same building. This fast track project consisted of 12,000 square feet of new data center and UPS rooms to be completed within a five month time frame. 60 percent of electrical scope was completed in a little over a month due to delays from 29 bulletins, 200+ RFIs, and approximately 200 drawings being changed throughout the process with no schedule extension. Work was completed in a day shift consisting of 20 men, night shift consisting of 10 men, and Saturday and Sunday labor consisting of 30+ men each day. Electrical improvements included two new 750KVA UPS systems, PDU’s, RPP’s, lighting, fire alarm, and EPO systems.

David Belcher, Mike Caffrey, Dwight Daniels II, Ha Le, Mike Rowe, Adrian Smith — Singleton Electric Company, Inc.

Project Name: Western Branch Facility Upgrade,  Upper Marlboro, MD
Architect/Engineer:  AECOM
General Contractor:  Frucon Construction
The plant treats 30 million gallons of wastewater per day. It was critical that the electrical upgrades which this project called for did not stop the normal operations and processes of the plant. Singleton coordinated all of the outages closely with plant staff to ensure a smooth transition to new operations. Upgrades included the raw wastewater pump station, influent channel and reactor, sludge withdrawal systems, high rate activated sludge and nitrification activated sludge processes, dissolved air flotation, and thickened sludge storage system. Construction also provided new aerated grit chambers, modifications to the reactor pipe gallery, blower, chlorine and control building, motor control center, electrical systems and miscellaneous site improvements.

Bruce Baldwin, Greg Baldwin, Zoran Jessic, Mike McLaughlin, Hasan Oklopcic, Robert Roye — Singleton Electric Company, Inc.

Project Name: Filtration & Disinfection Upgrade, Phase 3, Electrical,  Washington, DC
Architect/Engineer:  Malcolm Pirnie
General Contractor:  Ulliman Schutte
The project required the installation of new 5KV switchgear and Motor Control Center’s (MCC) along with 480V switchgear and MCC’s. This project was completed under difficult working conditions all while maintaining plan operational requirements with D.C. Water to keep the filtration and disinfection facilities in continuous dependable operation during construction. The work was sequenced in a manner to ensure that the required number of feeders, pumps, panel boards, MMC’s, instrumentation, and filters remained in service. Singleton accomplished this with new 5KV switchgear and 5KV MCC’s in a new electric building. Singleton replaced existing 480V switchgear and 480V MCC’s in two existing electric buildings.

Rob Holland, Buddy McDowell, Ed Pickens, Steve Popp, Jim Roberts, John Sherwood — Power Solutions, LLC

Project Name: IAD54 Data Center,  Ashburn, VA
Architect:  DJM Architecture
Engineer:  JEK Engineering, LLC
The project consisted of the build-out of approximately 20,000 square feet of raised floor white space and 9,600 square feet of electrical room space. As part of the project requirements, the customer had requested that project be constructed using cable tray and mc cable tray feeders to the fullest extent as possible. This required the electrical team at Power Solutions to design the entire electrical room support structure and raceway system prior to starting the project so that it could be coordinated with the other trades and submitted to the engineering team for approval prior to the start of construction. The project schedule also required the crews to work extended hours and weekends in order to have the equipment installed and online to support the customer needs.

Steve Baldwin, Robert Holland, Chuck Knaack, Eric Marlow, Dan Tabler, Eric White — Power Solutions, LLC

Project Name: IAD32 Data Center,  Sterling, VA
Architect:  DJM Architecture
Engineer:  JEK Engineering, LLC
Power Solutions was contracted for the build-out of approximately 40,000 square feet data center space in Sterling, VA. This project involved the installation of but not limited to the following items: four 3450KVA utility transformers, four 2500KW generators and enclosures, six 4000amp 480V switchboards, eight 800KVA UPS modules and battery cabinets, one 3000 amp critical service fed from the adjacent building, one 2500 amp mechanical service fed from the adjacent building, eight 600 amp redundant PDU cabinets, electrical power monitoring system for the electrical systems, complete build-out of the data pods including rack power for all equipment racks, and installation of cable tray and approximately 1600 pre-fabricated power whips to power the 700 server racks in the white space.

Rod Denekas, Gilbert Dunbar, Tim Edney, James Hendrix, Steve Pfister, Jon Wamsley — Power Solutions, LLC

Project Name: IAD14 - POD1 through POD7,  Manassas, VA
Power Solutions was contracted for the feeder installation and integration of seven electrical rooms and seven data rooms with 10,000 square feet of data space each. This fast track project consisted of numerous feeder conduit runs, which were carefully designed in the field for accurate conduit layout and equipment integrations. The owner furnished equipment was not set until 90 percent of the conduit was in place. The project was completed with close coordination with the engineer, client, and the other trades. Crews worked extended single shift hours until the electrical room equipment was set, at which point double shifts were implemented in order to complete the project under a severely compressed construction schedule.

Mark Bailey, Thomas Barber, Juan Bonilla, Jeremiah Jordan, Summer Layaou, Jerry Sanfino — Power Solutions, LLC

Project Name: IAD14 Perdix Phase II,  Manassas, VA
Engineer:  JEK Engineering, LLC
Power Solutions was contracted for the feeder installation and interior integration for three self-contained data pods and one self-contained electrical room. Each of the 3,000 square-foot data pods required the connection of the external power, electrical monitoring system and installation of the data cable tray and grounding. The 2,400 square-foot electrical rooms required the inter-connect wiring of all the critical systems. Due to the soil conditions, all feeder conduits for the electrical and data pods were required to be installed above the ground on an independent support structure. The conduit and supports were installed prior to the equipment arriving to the site and the data pods and electrical room pod were slid into place and conduit systems attached.

Bryan Beebe, Brian Hull, Brian Williams, Marco Yates — Natelco Corporation

Project Name: 3 White Flint North (3WFN) Tenant Improvements,  North Bethesda, MD
Architect:  HOK
Engineer:  GHT Limited
General Contractor:  Turner Construction Company
The project work included: redundant fed 1600 amp data center/825KVA UPS backed up, ten distribution panel boards, eight 225KVA K-13 transformers, one 825KVA UPS unit with MBP, battery cabinets and three 15 ton CRAC units installed within a 1,100 square-foot space, impressive coordination of conduit installation and equipment layout. And the bud duct and associated feeder installation for the power distribution of over 100 data racks. This area of the building was built out during the 15th floor interior fit-out. The nine month project was supervised by head foreman Marko Yates.

Michael Burch, Brian Collender, Rudy Guzman, Craig Hyde, Jeffrey Waugerman, Richard Wells, Jr. — Dynalectric Company

Project Name: Navy Federal Credit Union Headquarters - Generator Building Addition,  Vienna, VA
Architect:  J3 Design Collective, Inc.
Engineer:  Williams Notaro & Associates, LLC
General Contractor:  HITT Contracting Inc.
The project wok consisted of installation of: four 2500A switchboards, two 2000A switchboards, two distribution switchboards, five panel boards, three transformers, four 2500A battery disconnects, battery racks, 960 batteries, ladder tray, two 1100KVA UPS systems with maintenance bypass panels, two 1500KW generators, two 2500A automatic transfer switches, one 2500A manual transfer switch, new utility ductbanks, 1500KW load bank, meters, disconnect switches, over 20,000 feet of conduit, over 50,000 feet of wire all into a 5,4000 square-foot generator building. The project involved numerous trades working in close proximity and within limited space. It also involved several outages for tie-ins requiring MOP’s and coordination between GC, EC, and facility staff.

Dwight Cox, David Edwards, Michael Lambert, Kyle Muise, Shawn Neylon, Jerald Shipman — J.E. Richards, Inc.

Project Name: The Aerospace Corporation - Phase 1,  Chantilly, VA
Architect:  KGD Architecture
Engineer:  CH2M Hill
General Contractor:  DAVIS Construction Corporation
The work in the 60,000 square-foot data center consisted of but was not limited to: four 3750KV primary, two 5KV amp distribution boards, two 3KV amp distribution boards, two 3Meg generators, load bank, 30 static switches, 30 PDU, four 750 UPS, two 500 UPS, 98 sections of track bus, 500 feet of 5KV amp cable bus, 5KV amp, and 3KV amp bus duct. The craftsman used special consideration while installing the sub ceiling and all of the connecting cabling, conduit, and tray.
Star Award Nominee

Special Systems

(including security, control & instrumentation)

Richard Henry, Kenneth Higgins, Alan Hoffnagle, Chendaroya Pal, Robert C. Russell, Kevin Wilson — J.E. Richards, Inc.

Project Name: The Aerospace Corporation - Phase 1,  Chantilly, VA
Craftsmen Company:  J.E. Richards, Inc.
Architect:  KGD Architecture
Engineer:  CH2M Hill
General Contractor:  DAVIS Construction Corporation
Nominator:  J.E. Richards, Inc.

Telecommunications Systems & Facilities

Rod Cannon, Michael Fagan, Bill Paris, Jeremy Sheaffer — Net100, Ltd.

Project Name: The Aerospace Corporation - Phase 1,  Chantilly, VA
Architect:  KGD Architecture
Engineer:  CH2M Hill
General Contractor:  DAVIS Construction Corporation
The IT cabling installation for the Aerospace Corporation – Phase I project was highly complex and had to meet the requirements of multiple end-users. NET100 immediately stepped into a design-build role with this system as the bid documents were schematic. After four months of design, coordination, and program meetings, a complete set of working plans were developed. Each network had to be individually identified with a distinct color/label for all cabinets, racks, panels, cables, connectors, jackets, patchords, conveyances, etc. In total, NET100 installed 800 miles of backbone fiber strands and 300 miles of workstation cabling to distribute the networks to over 1,200 outlets throughout the facility. The IT cabling installation was completed several weeks ahead of schedule with less than 30 punch list items noted by the owner and design team.

Finishes

Ceramic Tile and Terrazzo

Marcos Castillo, M. Antonio Martinez, Mario Rivero — David Allen Company

Project Name: CityCenterDC,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Shalom Baranes Architects
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
Approximately 50 different dwelling unit bathroom layouts were used within the units. The complexities of these details were amplified by the recessed sliding shower door tracks and swinging shower door hardware. Also contributing to the superior execution of the tile work are skillfully mitered corner conditions, clean aluminum edging, consistent transitions to the stone countertops, transitions to the recessed wall cabinets, and virtually seamless tile to wood flooring transition. Many of these details are atypical in commercial residential construction and require multiple mobilizations to complete when sequencing the work with that of other trades.

Hugo Castro, Luciano Corcos, Anibal German, Johnny Perez, Oscar Reyes, Cesar Turcios — Gemstar Group

Project Name: Salamander Resort & Spa,  Middleburg, VA
Architect:  Kent Interior Design
General Contractor:  Turner Construction Company
Gemstar played a very important role in their installation of the stone and tile floors, granite countertops, and miscellaneous stone throughout the project. The Spa’s nearly 20,000 square-foot floor is tiled with stone completely, while areas such as the indoor pool and curved walls throughout the spa needed special tile to be crafted. Gemstar proved to be an exceptional sub-contractor that impressed both owner and contractor alike.

Elvin Amaya, Fabio Amaya, Romario Amaya, Eric Mejia, Jose Rivas, Elvis Santos — Roman Mosaic

Project Name: Dunbar Senior High School,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Perkins Eastman Architects
General Contractor:  Gilbane Building Company
The terrazzo scope of work at Dunbar Senior High School was critical to fulfilling the objective of recognizing and preserving the rich history of the school. Approximately 220 stainless steel floor plaques, featuring the engraved names and accomplishments of Dunbar alumni, were installed (integral with the terrazzo) throughout the school. Roman Mosaic not only installed the terrazzo but also formed and inlaid all plaques, all within a fast-tracked construction schedule that required constant coordinator and strict deadlines. This scope of work was also a part of the projects sustainable building initiative. The project featured low maintenance finished, photovoltaic panels, geothermal wells, daylighting, and many other green building components.

Limbert Claure, Mascedonia Rivera, Juan J. Rodriguez, Frank Varette, Jr., Pablo Torres, Ronald Wondoloski — Boatman and Magnani, Inc.

Project Name: Cardozo High School Modernization,  Washington, DC
Architects:  Hartman-Cox / Grimm + Parker
General Contractor:  GCS-SIGAL, LLC
This project included flash/floating the existing 80-year-old concrete floor with epoxy up to 1’’ thick in order to achieve a flat floor installation of 30,000 square feet of Epoxy Resin Terrazzo Flooring and Stairs. The vast expansive area and the flatness are evident by the consistent manner of the reflecting light. Adhering to the architect’s design intent, the alignment of the strips to mitigate reflective cracking was crucial. The floors were custom blended with mother of pearl and purple glass chips to replicate the school colors and achieve an overall consistency of the shades and patterns within the floor. The craftsmen were challenged with the tight installation schedule and school opening deadlines, but achieved a timely completion and aesthetic appeal of the completed space.

Flooring

Don Baugher, John Baugher, Chris Lang — Johns Wood Floor Specialist Inc.

Project Name: Francis L. Cardozo Education Campus,  Washington, DC
Architects:  Hartman-Cox / Grimm + Parker
General Contractor:  GCS-SIGAL, LLC
Existing corridor wood floors were patched, repaired, and refinished. Wood floors from classrooms converted into science labs were salvaged and reinstalled in newly created classrooms. The wood floor from the old gymnasium was salvaged and reinstalled throughout the corridors. Wood that had been salvaged from previous projects was also used in the patching and repair. John’s Wood Floor completed the project despite the challenges of climate control, accessibility, logistics coordination with all other trades, and a fast-tracked schedule.

Plaster

(including Stucco and Dryvitt)

Miguel M. Agustin, Andrew Amurrio, Norberto Amurrio, Oscar Amurrio, Silvio Amurrio, Edgar Guzman — Eight Brothers

Project Name: William H Gross Stamp Gallery Expansion,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Cho Benn Holback and Associates
Engineer:  Spiegel Zamecnik & Shah
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
Eight Brothers worked closely behind the demolition team on this project to repair the 40-foot plaster pilasters after the removal of the existing mezzanine steel supports. The main area consisted of a large atrium that was split into two open levels and surrounded by a perimeter mezzanine level. The mezzanine was supported by decorative structural steel, however when it was removed, unfinished, damaged plaster columns were found. In order to restore the natural look of the plaster, Eight Brothers played a big role in historical preservation and repair. The existing, unscathed plaster had to be molded so that the re-work of plaster looked seamless, and it took several application, tooling, hand sanding and paint to result in exquisitely restored columns.

Specialty Painting

Edwin Castellon, Henry Castellon, Jose Castellon, Serge Vadenoff — Senza-Finé, Inc.

Project Name: Salamander Resort & Spa,  Middleburg, VA
Architect:  Kent Interior Design
General Contractor:  Turner Construction Company
Senza Finé’s superior craftsmanship and work exceeded the expectations of Turner, the designer, and client. The finish that Senza Fine uses not only needs special products, but very special and talented artists as well. In order to get the best finish, several artists came together to apply the paint/stucco for a consistent yet artistic finish. The Salamander Resort & Spa Pre-Function and Entry areas received a stunning work of art that impressed the guests and media.

Ginger Hill, John (Jack) Pabis, Debbie Pascal, Randi Pascal, Anna Torre-Smith — ATS Studios, LLC

Project Name: National Archives Experience Phase 2,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Hartman-Cox Architects
General Contractor:  Grunley Construction Company
ATS Studios marbleized two four-story staircases in the public access areas at National Archives in D.C. The task was to match the historic marble that already exist on the treads, risers, and base. The plaster wainscot, chair rails, handrails and inside of the spiral staircase were all painted. The Trome L’oeil effect fools many into thinking that the painted areas are real marble. It was a privilege to work on a project right next to national treasures. The artisans on this project have achieved a level of excellence far above the expectations.

Masonry

Exterior Stone

(including marble, granite & exterior pavers)

Duane Graham, David Jonke, William Orellana, Jose Ornelas, Tom Palovich, Shaggy Walters — Bratti/Rugo, A Joint Venture

Project Name: CityCenterDC,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Shalom Baranes Architects
Engineer:  SK&A Structural Engineers, PLLC
General Contractor:  Clark/Smoot A Joint Venture
There were several challenging and detailed stone features within the project, but the most prominent for the Bratti/Rugo was the landscape design and installation of the 2,500 square-foot CNC sculptured fountains and 4,000 square-foot plinths between the Central Plaza and the North West park areas. Other exterior work performed by Bratti/Rugo included installing 80,000 square feet of pavers, constructing 6,000 square feet of exterior walls, and placing benches throughout. The exterior site landscape features required several trips to Italy to inspect and quality control the very complex fabrication of the stone. Particular attention was given to the fountains. The complicated CNC profiled fountains shapes were milled from 16-inch thick steel grey granite to provide the contoured texture.

Fernando Barbosa, Noe Blanco, Chris Lansca, Santos Lopez, Zenon Moya, Richard Youngblood — Rugo Stone, LLC

Project Name: Center for Strategic and International Studies,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Hickok Cole Architects
General Contractor:  HITT Contracting Inc.
The exterior stone is Tennessee pink with a honed finish. There is over 12,000 square feet of stone on the exterior. The finish fits well with other D.C. buildings and the fabrication and installation show superior work. The stone along the north façade also transitions well to the cornice above the ninth floor balcony. The panels at this location are a stone veneer on a honeycomb panel that were engineered to work with the structural steel thermal movement and snow loads.

Candido Abundez, Victor Castro, Jose Francisco, Ivan Lopez, Victor Painter, Nelson Portillo — Lorton Stone, LLC

Project Name: Washington Monument Earthquake Repairs,  Washington, DC
Architect/Engineer:  Wiss, Janney, Elstner Associates, Inc.
General Contractor:  Perini Management Services, Inc.
The Washington Monument stone repair required hundreds of Dutchmen with extremely tight tolerances, epoxy injection along the broken stones of the pyramidium, exterior caulking of pyramidium joints, and a large quantity of repointing. All work was required to occur off of swing stages located 100-150 feet off the ground. With a demanding schedule, along with navigating varying weather conditions, the work has been installed at such a high level of craftsmanship that as each area was punched out, there were few, if any, items open 24 hours after review.

Candido Abundez, Victor Castro, Jose Escamilla, Andres Jerez, Manuel Silva Moitatta, Oscar Reyes — Lorton Stone, LLC

Project Name: U.S. Supreme Court West Façade Restoration,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Architect of the Capitol
General Contractor:  Forrester Construction Company
The scope of work at the west façade renovation consisted of the very delicate restoration of the capitals, columns, and statuary surrounding the front entry of the U.S. Supreme Court. This restoration work performed by Lorton Stone demanded countless man hours and tedious oversight to ensure the national treasured was handled and restored to the highest standards of quality possible. Lorton Stone has received multiple commendations and notices of recognition for their exemplary performance from the project owner, The Architect of Capital.

Jose Compos-Diaz, Miguel Diaz, Bill Greenart, Pete Machado, Andy Peckne, Mike Wondoloski — R. Bratti Associates, Inc.

Project Name: Sherman Building Repairs,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Quinn Evans Architects
Engineer:  Keast & Hood Company
General Contractor:  The Christman Company
Preservation Consultant:  PRESERVE/scapes
Stone masons from R. Bratti Associates, Inc. exemplified extraordinary craftsmanship, dedication, and professionalism during the extensive post-earthquake recovery of the 19th century Sherman Building in Washington, D.C. Their skill and expertise met the task of repairing and reconstruction severely damaged historic masonry in the face of hazardous conditions not previously seen in the seismically quite Washington metropolitan area. Despite of many dangers and challenges, Bratti maintained quality and schedule, while honoring the rich historic significance of the building. They bravely led the stabilization of the historic masonry that was displaced by the seismic event and worked tirelessly to mitigate hazardous conditions, while ensuring the long-term preservation of this landmark.
Star Award Winner for Technical Excellence

Interior Stone & Marble

Fernando Barbosa, Noe Blanco, Chris Lansca, Filipe Madureira, Zenon Moya, Richard Youngblood — Rugo Stone, LLC

Project Name: Center for Strategic and International Studies,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Hickok Cole Architects
General Contractor:  HITT Contracting Inc.
The building interior contains over 19,000 square feet of stone flooring and 13,000 square feet of wall panels. The flooring is an Italian white stone with a honed finish. The stone walls are a continuation of the building façade and are made from the same honed Tennessee pink as the exterior. In addition to the tremendous quantity of stone installed over a short period of time, the cuts for each piece match the different building elements. The building perimeter is comprised of non-perpendicular lines and the lines created by the diagonal arcade columns continue through the stone flooring joints. The main atrium space is lined with stone wall panels that stretch up over 45 feet.

Dan Karwacki, Kenny Morgan, Bob Radke, Rick Swinburn — R. Bratti Associates, Inc.

Project Name: National Archives Experience Phase 2,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Hartman-Cox Architects
General Contractor:  Grunley Construction Company, Inc.
The interior scope of work for the National Archives Experience 2 Project involved the demolition of existing spaces, with the salvaging of historic stone for re-use and integration of new marble provided by domestic North American suppliers. All work was accomplished off-hours so that the operations of the National Archives research and study facilities remained uninterrupted. The task of finding matching stone to the original marble produced many decades ago was difficult. It took the R. Bratti Associates, Inc. team nearly a year to identify and locate particular colors and textures of the material. Once the appropriate material was discovered, it also had to be collected and stored for the future phases of the project. A number of rare and limited production marbles, which were produced in the United States, were integrated into the design.

Victor Lemus, Kenny Morgan, Mike Patterson — R. Bratti Associates, Inc.

Project Name: Rockville Metro Plaza II,  Rockville, MD
Architect:  WDG Architecture, PLLC
General Contractor:  Foulger-Pratt Contracting, LLC
All of the interior stones were imported from Portugal and Italy which had been scheduled for fabrication, delivery, and installation in accordance with the old construction schedule. R. Bratti Associates, Inc. successfully accelerated the fabrication, subsequent delivery, and installation in order to accommodate the intensely abbreviated completion schedule for the upcoming tenant. In the midst of the rush, some design changes were incorporated into the scope for which new drawings were required and modifications to completed shop tickets that had already been released for fabrication were required. In addition to the interior lobby, R. Bratti Associates, Inc. provided all of the exterior stone base and site paving and walls throughout the project in the same period of time.

Unit Masonry

Francisco Gonzales, C. Michael Pappas, Julio Portillo, Luciano Ramos, Tranquilino Villegas — Telligent Masonry, LLC

Project Name: 77H,  Washington, DC
Architect:  MV&A Architects
General Contractor:  Clark Builders Group
The original design intent was to place this large, mixed-use into the neighborhood and make it seem like it has been there forever. The mission was accomplished through the design and the craftsmen of the exterior masonry executing to perfection. The brick-type and design detailing were taken in a large part from the adjacent Government Printing Office that is across the street and is omni-present in the neighborhood. Special consideration and installation precision was done to hang the large custom-colored precast cornice off of the podium concrete slab and then replicate higher in the building with metal as the wood framed structure could not adequately hold the precast. Much of the exterior detailing continues into the residential lobby, the Walmart lobby, and through the amenity spaces as designed to make it appear that the glass boxes were add-ons at a later date to the building.

Mechanical

HVAC-Piping

Mario Dragone, Anthony Hankins, Robert Nation, Clifford Nolan, Fred Parsels, Dale Weiland — U.S. Engineering Company

Project Name: NGA Technology Center - Third Floor Fit-Out,  Ft. Belvoir, VA
Architect/Engineer:  RTKL/Kling Stubbins
General Contractor:  Clark/Balfour Beatty JV
Fitting out the third floor included large amounts of mechanical and electrical work, including the installation of more than 50 computer room air conditioning units, a pre-action sprinkler system, chilled water pumps, and a hydrogen detection system. The piping systems for the Technology Center and the Central Utility Plant required a complex installation of steel, copper, and PVC materials that supply chilled water to the critical data center and main office building areas, as well as various support spaces around the NGA campus. The complex design, existing conditions of the operational facility, and the coordination required to install the new work in and around the existing work were all challenges that were overcome while providing this high quality installation.

Matthew Athey, David Bauer, Craig Bouroth, Keith Fletcher, Michael Holmes, Kenny Rhan — W.E. Bowers, Inc.

Project Name: 5601 Fishers Lane Central Utility Plant,  Rockville, MD
Architect:  HOK
Engineer:  GHT Limited
General Contractor:  DAVIS Construction Corporation
The CUP is comprised of two separate plants that work together; one is for the building’s HVAC systems and the other provides cooling for the high-density data center. Redundant systems ensure that the data center always has cooling. W.E. Bowers’ outstanding personnel was brought in beginning with the 3D trade coordination process to the pre-fabrication shop, and ultimately, to field installation. The advanced coordination employed on this project allowed for W.E. Bowers to provide the client with a superior product at a competitive price and impressive schedule. The finished work is not only functional, it is visually impressive- a testament to the solid engineering and excellent craftsmanship provided by W.E. Bowers.

Al Bonner, Tony Davis, David Harrison, Danny Kerns, Joshua Pearson, Scott Sisk — Pierce Associates, Inc.

Project Name: George Washington University Ross Hall - 5th & 6th Floor Renovation, Washington, DC
Architect:  Cannon Design
Engineer:  Affiliated Engineers, Inc.
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
The ceiling space in the laboratory areas was marginally sufficient for the HVAC systems which are a combination of chilled beams, terminal supply and exhaust units and hot water reheat coils. The medical/lab gases, acid waste and traditional plumbing systems coupled with the many electrical and fire protection systems resulted in a very congested ceiling space. Prior to demolition, much of the equipment in the main mechanical room on the third floor was accessible only by crawling under duct tape and pipe. The equipment in this mechanical room is now very accessible even though there are many more pieces of equipment in the space now then were prior to renovation.

John Carter, Richard Cherba, Daniel Harrington, Matt Hill, Willie Moore, Matt Powers — Pierce Associates, Inc.

Project Name: FDA at White Oak Cogeneration Plant,  Silver Spring, MD
Architect:  HGA Architects and Engineers
Engineer:  H&A Architects & Engineers
General Contractor:  Engineered Systems Alliance, LLC
The contractor installed all HVAC piping systems for the new $213 million CHP plant at the FDA’s White Oak Federal Research Center. The new plant includes two 7.5MW and one 4.5MW combustion turbine generators with heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), one 5MW steam turbine generator, two 2.25MW diesel black start generators, a 25KPPH dual fuel steam boiler, three 2,500-ton and one 2,000-ton electric centrifugal hillers and a two million gallon thermal energy storage system. The new CUP will operate in parallel with the existing CHP plant. Piping systems installed include three classes of steam, compressed natural gas, fuel oil, reverse osmosis, boiler feedwater, condensate return, heating hot water, chilled water, condenser water, compressed air, aqueous, and vaporized ammonia and deionized water.

Van Baker, James Balderson, Brian Capps, George Dehney, Jade McCain, Richard McKelvey — Dominion Mechanical Contractors, Inc.

Project Name: Novant Health Haymarket Medical Center,  Haymarket, VA
Architect:  Gresham, Smith & Partners
Engineer:  CCRD
General Contractor:  Brasfield & Gorrie, LLC
The project size was 236,000 square feet with 43,250 square feet of shell space. It included work on 121 patient rooms and the composite steel frame superstructure. Dominion Mechanical performed work on levels one through four, the penthouse level, and in the central energy plant. In the central energy plant, Dominion Mechanical worked on two chillers, one heat pump chiller, two cooling towers, two steam boilers, three heating hot water boilers, two domestic hot water heaters and two generators.

Keith Fletcher, Matthew Grinestaff, Tom Mannas, Dennis McNamee, Robin Taylor, William Wilson — W.E. Bowers, Inc.

Project Name: USAMRIID Chiller Replacement and New Chiller Plant,  Ft. Detrick, MD
Architect:  Studio 50 Design, LLC
Engineer:  Liberty Engineering, LLP
General Contractor:  Turner Construction Company
This design-build project included the installation of a new variable primary chilled water distribution system which provides 3,300 tons of cooling capacity with N+1 redundancy. The four new chillers and cooling towers are located within a new precast building structure which also contains the heat exchanger, pumps, and chemical treatment system. The new chilled water piping traverses the existing roof and ties into the existing system in the penthouse mechanical space. Due to the mission critical nature of the facility and its research activities, all outages and tie-ins were closely coordinated with the facility management staff to minimize impacts to the building’s operations. The tight project site posed a significant challenge which the team overcame with an effective design and the use of prefabrication wherever possible in order to safely and efficiently install the new piping systems.

HVAC-Sheet Metal

John Barnett, Gabino Bennett, Harry Biller, Jimmy Dwyer, Aaron LaBille, Charles White — Pierce Associates, Inc.

Project Name: George Washington University Ross Hall - 5th & 6th Floor Renovation,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Cannon Design
Engineer:  Affiliated Engineers, Inc.
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
Ross Hall is George Washington University’s primary biomedical research and teaching facility. Originally constructed in 1973, Pierce Associates did the original mechanical and plumbing work on the project. The building consists of seven levels above grade and two levels below grade. The below grade levels are parking, building support facilities, and a vivarium. The first two levels above grade are for medical instruction; the third floor contains air-handling units, mechanical equipment and facilities offices. The upper four levels contain lab and offices for medical research. Facility modifications are also being made to adjacent floors, infrastructure upgrades on the third floor mechanical spaces, sub-basement, central utility plant, and roof.

Metals

Miscellaneous Metal Fabrication

Jesus Castillo, Serafin Espinoza, James Lee, Melchor Martinez, Alexander Mendoza, Ruben Ramirez — Big D Metalworks

Project Name: Choice Hotels International Headquarters,  Rockville, MD
Architect:  VOA Associates
General Contractor:  rand* construction corporation
One of the two stairwells at the project features excellence in metal fabrication due not only to the remarkable end product, but also the obstacles overcome in the fabrication and install of the stair. The entire team dedicated extensive manpower and time to leveling the floors on each of the six stories prior to the laying of flooring and installation of the two stairwells. The layout of the metal fabricated stair is unique in that the slab edge is angled, making the fabrication and installation particularly complex. The existing floor slab was modified with a steel 3/8-inch thick plate in order to compensate for the original stair angles and sizes, forcing the metal fabricators to coordinate closely with the architect, flooring contractors, and structural engineers.

Ornamental Metal

Jesus Castillo, Lee Coffey, Serafin Espinoza, Melchor Martinez, Baltazar Perdomo, Sergio Ramirez — Big D Metalworks

Project Name: Promontory Financial-Stairwell,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Gensler
Engineer:  Tadjer Cohen Associates, Inc.
General Contractor:  Robert T. Pizzano General Contractors, Inc.
All components on the new stair had to match the existing components. The stair features custom-fabricated built-up steel stringers in a switchback design with a glass railing system. The system is supported in a custom-fabricated stainless steel shoe which is attached on top of the stringers with a contract reveal between the two. All miters were field-fit and finished by hand. The greatest challenge was getting into the occupied space and installing the stair with an existing stair above which was accomplished without disturbing the connections of the existing stair, or more importantly, the activities of the tenant and their guests.

Structural Steel Framing

Craftsmen of American Iron Works, Inc.

Project Name: 1812 North Moore Street,  Arlington, VA
Architect:  Davis Carter Scott, Ltd.
Engineer:  KCE Structural Engineers
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
The pyramid on top of the office building is more than the project’s signature feature- it was also the most challenging to fabricate and install. AIW overcame significant technical and logistical obstacles to deliver. The pyramid’s tolerances were so tight that the geometry required the team to use three-dimensional modeling and full-size connection jibs to maintain orientation. The pyramid structure had to be precise enough to accommodate glass panels from another subcontractor. Adding to the complexity, not only is the pyramid asymmetrical, but the pyramid legs themselves are asymmetrical pyramids.
Star Award Nominee

Ali Azad, Elie Rizk - Iron Fabrication Services Inc.

Project Name: William H. Gross Stamp Gallery Expansion,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Cho Benn Holback and Associates
Engineer:  Spiegel Zamecnik & Shah
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
Iron Fabrications was responsible for building back over demolition areas. The scope of work required the addition of a mezzanine floor that is now a classroom area for visiting schools; a large zigzag wall that displays dozens of illuminated exhibit cases; a free-standing double curved wall that plays home to the “America’s Gems” special collection; and the addition of an elevator that services three levels. All of these are common interior renovation tasks, but given the nature of the project and location, Iron Fabrication had to get creative. The structural steel was not designed around the parameters of the only entry ways for crews and material: a 6-foot by 3-foot hatch opening and existing door, so the company had to make use of cranes, pulleys, and heavy lifting.

Ronnie Kennedy, Sean McNamara, Mark Gary Tewell, Angel Vargas — Performance Contracting, Inc.

Project Name: Kennedy Center Theater Lab,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Richter Cornbrooks Gribble, Inc.
General Contractor:  rand* construction corporation
The Kennedy Center Theater Lab required renovations to virtually every element of the space in order to reach the client’s desire result. The renovation required a total demolition of the existing stage, risers, and seating area in order to rebuild from the bottom up. The project team had to perform a complete overhaul of the air handler system, a product of the 1970s, to include new ductwork, pumps, and a fan motor. Complex requirements and a tight, sensitive schedule truly hindered various trades; yet their ability to fabricate and install all proper elements the first time around allowed for the progress of the schedule and the staggering of trades to ensure major milestones and deadlines were met.

Sitework

Underpinning, Foundations and Excavations

Tony Franklin, Chet Mahesky, Scott Pashkevich, Thomas Snowden, Rodney Spencer, Scott Stewart — Clark Foundations, LLC

Project Name: GWU Square 77 Residence Hall,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Ayers Saint Gross Architects & Planners
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
The craftsmen were responsible for the fabrication of the steel towers and the erection on-site, including quality control and layout of the numerous welded connections which required considerable skill and coordination of a team of pile drivers. Installation of bracing inside the existing buildings was done by manual handling. The layout, cutting, fitting, and welding steel bracing to follow the outline of the existing structures required continuous check to follow the different dimensions around the building. All this work was required in order to preserve three historic facades to be incorporated into a new residence hall for GWU.

Olsi Bokciu, Gary Henry, Jose Ortiz, Alcides Portillo — Steele Foundations, LLC

Project Name: George Washington University Law Clinic Townhouses,  Washington, DC
Architects:  Shalom Baranes Associates / Perkins+Will
Engineer:  Tadjer Cohen Edelson
General Contractor:  DAVIS Construction Corporation
The underpinning work was completed on three late 19th century townhouses in the Foggy Bottom area of D.C. The existing lower level, which was underpinned, was 5,600 square feet and contained approximately 146 individual underpinning pits. The underpinning pits were at most 5 feet wide and averaged 3-4 feet in depth with several that went to 8 feet at the new elevator shaft. Aside from the obvious age of the buildings, other obstacles such as the adjacent jobs, ongoing structural demolition, difficult sub-soil conditions, and a very tight site footprint made for a very challenging underpinning project.

Melvin Henderson, Simeon Moran, Adam Pashkevich, Chris Pashkevich, Robby Pashkevich, Carlos Vega — Clark Foundations, LLC

Project Name: 601 Massachusetts Avenue NW at Mount Vernon Square,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Duda Paine Architects
Engineer:  Thornton Tomasetti
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
The support of excavation system utilized three tiers of tiebacks and corner braces to support an astounding cut of 65 feet. Solider beams were prefabricated for tiebacks prior to driving, which required significant quality control for accuracy. Due to existing below-grade foundation walls, spread footings, and a 10-12-foot slope cut around the perimeter of the excavation, considerable coordination with the demolition and excavation subcontractors was required during the pile driving operation. The geometry and depth of the excavation also required special coordination and sequencing during the lagging and tieback operations to meet and aggressive schedule.

Andres Cortez, Timothy George, Gary Pashkevich, Michael Phelps, Kris Tolfsen — Clark Foundations, LLC

Project Name: Building 49 Adaptive Reuse,  Washington, DC
Architect of Recotd:  Perkins+Will
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
At maximum depth, Building 49 is 30 feet below grade. The underground design required a complicated support of excavation system consisting of both temporary and permanent retention elements including but not limited to a combination of dilled soldier and secant piles supported by tiebacks. The overall system included over 111 drill secant and 32 temporary soldier pile shafts totaling 1,400 cubic yards of concrete, 49 permanent brackets, 95 permanent tiebacks ranging between 60-75 feet long, 31 temporary tiebacks ranging between 30-50 feet long, and 8,000 square feet of timber lagging.

Special Construction

Civil Pump Station

Ken Malloy, Hank Miller, Donnie Smith, Gordon Treichel, Mark Valentine, Brian Welch* — Flippo Construction Co., Inc.

Project Name: Laytonsville Booster Pump Station,  Gaithersburg, MD
Architect/Engineer:  Chester Engineers
General Contractor:  Flippo Construction Co., Inc.
This project required the flawless craftsmanship of multiple trades during the fabrication and installation of this building. The building and its contents were constructed in Centralia, IL while the site work was completed in Gaithersburg, MD. Crews installed 12-inch DIP turn ups at a precise measurement in order to allow two equipment skids of pumps and piping to fit perfectly over the suction and discharge headers. Additionally, the foundation was built in several sections on sight with an 8-inch knee wall for the new building to rest on once it was on-site. The CIP concrete work performed was done to perfection to match the pre-fab building from Illinois; they matched perfectly to the foundation when it was delivered.
(* posthumously)

Composite Wall Panels

Craftsmen of The Miller-Clapperton Partnership, Inc.

Project Name: PBS Satellite Operations Center I Expansion,  Alexandria, VA
Architect:  Bloomfield Assocaites
Engineer:  Z&F Consulting
General Contractor:  HITT Contracting Inc.
As part of a renovation to PBS’ existing 8,000 square-foot broadcast center, which included a new 3,000 square-foot MEP building annex, the facility’s exterior CMU façade was re-surfaced with a Trespa composite paneling and rain screen system. The Aluminum Gray and English Red panels are supported by a EUROFOX furring system, and are designed to be removable to accommodate future concealed electrical raceway installation. Working closely with the architect, HITT Contracting worked through the design process to ensure precise fit, reveal alignment, and coordination with pre-existing satellite cable buss penetration. The Trespa panels, which were a 16-week lead time, required three weeks of dedicated shop drawing review and daily on-site coordination with the subcontractor during the 12 week installation period.

Elevators, Escalators and other Conveying Systems

Frank Dearinger, Scott Dearinger, Eugene Foster, Dennis Lipscomb, Robert Marks, Matthew Moorefield — Otis Elevator

Project Name: 1812 North Moore Street,  Arlington, VA
Architect:  Davis Carter Scott, Ltd.
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
1812 North Moore is equipped with 21 elevator and escalator units. These units are comprised of: two custom cantilevered hydraulic elevators, two custom roped hydraulic elevators, two escalators, three Gen2 parking garage elevators, five low rise (700 fpm) MVS traction elevators, five high rise (1200 fpm) MVS traction elevators, and two high rise (700 fpm) MVS service elevators. Completing this project was challenging for several reasons- The elevator material required delivery support of over 30 53-foot-long trailers of equipment. The jobsite conditions required these deliveries to be scheduled in advance and closely managed by the construction team. Deliveries consumed over one month of dedicated delivery lanes and precise onsite storage requirement.

Tony Messick, Jose Privado, Drew Sciandra — Schindler Elevator Corporation

Project Name: Rehabilitation of Orange Blue Line Metro Rail System,  Arlington, VA
Architect:  Washington Metro Area Transit Authority
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
Schindler Elevator Corporation is responsible for providing the rehabilitation of 90 Westinghouse Modular 100 Glass Balustrade escalators, three O&K escalators, and seven Schindler escalators. In addition to rehabilitating these units, Schindler is responsible for the replacement of three APV Baker escalators with three new heavy duty transit grade escalators, each with a rise of 40 feet three inches. Schindler’s replacement of the APV Bakers escalators was exemplary. Three units were replaced simultaneously. Detailed coordination efforts, along with multiple weeks of overtime shifts, were required in order to complete the escalator replacement on time. All testing and commissioning activities were scheduled during off hours and supported by additional escalator technicians as required.

Foodservice Assembly

Richard Blessing, P. Kevin Richards — Facilities Services, Inc.

Project Name: Marriott Headquarters Servery,  Bethesda, MD
Architect:  OPX
Foodservice Consultant: Food Strategy, Inc.
General Contractor:  DAVIS Construction Corporation
Their extensive kitchen service equipment and assembly in the Marriott Headquarters Servery was exceptional, delivering a fully functional foodservice space while preserving the design integrity—making it a sanctuary for Marriott staff to enjoy mealtime. The equipment assembled was thoughtfully integrated into the entire design of the space, from the custom curved glass sneeze guards to the deli cases custom sized to fit within the curves of the millwork. From the beginning of the process, the architect and foodservice designer worked closely together to create a design that seamlessly blends the kitchen equipment into the space, integrating the food prep and kitchen equipment with the architectural components.
Star Award Nominee

Spa Equipment

David Britt, Mike Hartsell, Greg Mash, Andy Potter, Erick Smither, Ralph Tagliatela — Bradford Products

Project Name: Salamander Resort & Spa,  Middleburg, VA
Architect:  Kent Interior Design
General Contractor:  Turner Construction Company
Bradford provided some of the most cutting-edge and exquisite spa products on the market to the hotel, thus completing the name Salamander Resort & “Spa.” Their products includes men’s and women’s steam and whirlpools with a specially tiled dome, experience showers that provide the guests with different “themes” of showering to suit their mood, and the famous “Rasul,” which the guest enter into after taking a mud-bath. It consists of a steam-room, shower, and aromatherapy space all in one.

Thermal and Moisture Protection

Don Chansamone, Fernando Duran, Jesus Hernandez, Yas Khudhager, Gary Lawrence, Fernando Mendez — Prospect Waterproofing Company

Project Name: Smithsonian Institution Arts & Industries Building Revitalization - Shell: Exterior Enclosure & Structure,  Washington, DC
Architects:  Ennead Architects / SmithGroupJJR
General Contractor:  Grunley Construction Company, Inc.
The complex roof systems consisted of double locked 20 gauge stainless steel panels, flat lock panels and slate shingles installed over a full vapor barrier system, as well as a buildup of perimeter and transitional blocking with vented composition nail base panels covered with breathable membranes. Prior use of double locked 20 gauge stainless steel panels was non-existent within the construction industry; but they were specified as part of the design for this job to meet today’s standards for this 100-year-old roof. Typical roof details were a test of patience along with physical strength and ability. An abundance of research and design was performed for the roll forming, hand and mechanical seaming equipment required for the project’s extreme conditions.

Greg Ackerman, Bill Martel, Jaime Rivera Martinez, Kevin McDonald — Concrete Protection & Restoration, Inc.

Project Name: Jefferson Plaza Alley Waterproofing,  Arlington, VA
Architect/Engineer:  Paragon Engineering, Inc.
General Contractor:  The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
The existing asphalt and waterproofing was installed about 10 years ago and had since experienced multiple water infiltration issues. This renovation included the demolition of concrete sidewalks, curbs and pavers along the front of the Crowne Plaza Hotel, removal of all previously set asphalt and waterproofing, and the demolition of a large concrete apron; all above an existing occupied parking garage. During demolition, the post-tensioning cable had to be inspected for damage. All components that were demolished then had to be relayed to correct the water infiltration issues, improve access, and comply with ADA standards. The exceptional work performed by Concrete Protection & Restoration had to be broken down into four main phases, two of which each contained two sub-phases.

Woods & Plastics

Architectural Millwork

Jose Murillo, Hanh Nguyen, Kenneth Ramey, Jim Short, Ratsmy Thounakane, Bert Ward — Jefferson Millwork and Design, Inc.

Project Name: U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters,  Washington, DC
Architect:  WDG Architecture, PLLC
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
For the wall panels, Jefferson Millwork created a sketch-faced veneer lay-up with the 90mm/10mm pattern remained whole and intact from top to bottom. The result is a continuous waterfall effect of veneer that runs over 7,000 square feet of paneling. A complex sleeper system was constructed over concrete slab-shimmed to perfectly align with 100 feet of stone flooring and steel transition strip. Jefferson Millwork fabricated a custom veneer and hardwood security desk in the same 90mm/10mm pattern. The continual veneer water design lines up horizontally with the contiguous wall panels and also aligns with the hardwood flooring to create a desk structure which seems to grow out of the floor and walls.

Joey Cabanban, Mike Galayda, Chad Hill, Roger Parker, Arunas Sopa, Wade Sampsell — Gaithersburg Cabinetry & Millwork

Project Name: NPR Headquarters,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Hickok Cole Architects
Structural Engineer:  Thornton Tomasetti
Mechanical Engineer: TOLK, Inc., A Dewberry Company
General Contractor:  Balfour Beatty Construction
Overall, the project duration was just over two years from excavation to completion and turnover to NPR. The building was weather-tight with a majority of the drywall installed in the spring of 2012, at which point Gaithersburg had to field-measure, shop-construct and install their entire scope of work by the end of 2012. Adding to the complexity of this specific area of work, much of the detail design was initiated by Gaithersburg. In the major sound performance studio, Gaithersburg determined the reveal detail between the soffit and wall panels and created chases and access panels in the bench boxes for each of installation and wiring by the electrical subcontractor. The also redesigned the studio vision light detail to create the look the client desired.

Annik Couture, Jason Ledford, Christian Marquis, Audrey Rancourt, Steve Scheiber, Gabe Speet — Beaubois

Project Name: Montgomery County Judicial Center Annex and Renovation,  Rockville, MD
Architect/Engineer:  AECOM
General Contractor:  Tompkins Builders, Inc.
The architectural millwork in the Montgomery County Judicial Center Annex is not only a focal point but one of the defining features of the project. The package includes a multitude of complicating factors making its installation a challenge but the end result is both function and visually intriguing. Materials were selected to enhance the radius walls and lighting design throughout each courtroom space. The geometry and shape of the courtrooms includes radius walls on both the North and South sides which is translated throughout the building for a cohesive design. The panels are fabricated flat while a faceted installation process with the use of z-clips creates their curved appearance.
Star Award Nominee

Brian Cross, D.J. Fauber, Tom Hohman, Danen Roh, Arunas Sopa, Hung Vo — Gaithersburg Cabinetry & Millwork

Project Name: American Forest and Paper Association,  Washington, DC
Architect:  FOX Architects, LLC
General Contractor:  HITT Contracting Inc.
The project received the Green Globes certification for the build-out. The building is also seeking LEED Gold Existing Building Certification. The property’s 210 Energy Star rating is 96, indicative of a well-designed, constructed and operated building.

Charles Carter, Cameron Montagna, Jimmy Naylor, Ed Smith, Doug Wood — Capital Components & Millwork

Project Name: The Citron,  Silver Spring, MD
Architect:  Carlyn and Company
General Contractor:  Foulger-Pratt Contracting, LLC
The Citron has a stunning interior Amenity Area which includes a spacious lobby, cyber café, fitness room, club room, game room, and leasing center. The project was acknowledged by AGC and ENR with a Washington Contractors Awards and a “Best of 2013” Award in Residential, respectively. Capital Components & Millwork (CCM) was the subcontractor responsible for the architectural millwork in the amenity area. They had to overcome various challenges and, despite a compressed four week fit-out schedule and tight working conditions (with numerous trades working side-by-side), CCM’s quality execution and finishing of the work was exemplary and deserves to be nominated for a craftsmanship award.

Ernest Adaung, Tim Barth, Luis Martinez, Douglas Monard, Javier Morales, Benjamin Vasquez — Allegheny Millwork

Project Name: Adas Israel Building Renewal,  Washington, DC
Architect:  H3 Hardy Collaboration Architectural, LLC
General Contractor:  Forrester Construction Company
This project consisted of several large and complicated millwork items that incorporated a number of materials such as wood veneers, glass, and metals. This included a large ark cabinet in the main sanctuary with doors that measured 5 inches thick by 5 feet wide by 18 feet tall with an intricate pattern of raised wood panels with bronze accent trim. The effort and logistics to install the cabinet and large doors on the sanctuary stage was no small feat. In additional to the ark cabinet, a large specialized wood panel twisting strand configuration to either side of the stage consisted of 112 tile strings to a height of 40 feet totaling approximately 4,400 tile panels. Extensive engineering of the details and attachment methods went into the fabrication and installation of this panel system.

Kourosh Atri, Joel Cabanban, Brian Cross, Chad Hill, Keith Ice, West Mason — Gaithersburg Cabinetry & Millwork

Project Name: The Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington,  Mt. Vernon, VA
Architect:  Ayers Saint Gross Architects & Planners
Interior Design:  MFM Design
General Contractor:  The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
With 20,000 square feet of veneer work covering the 45,000 square-foot building, Gaithersburg achieved an impeccable installation. Roughly 60 percent of the wood veneer came from a single Sycamore tree; a wood typically used for mundane purposes such as making wood pallets, and created a beautiful product with a unique appearance. The veneer was carefully selected for its lively personality and varying figure that rendered a striking burnished finish. The veneer is blueprint matched and sequenced throughout the halls of the library. Because it is sequenced, there can be no mistakes without having to remake entire selections of the work. This type of veneer is of the highest grade and requires extraordinary skill for fabrication, finishing, and installing.
Star Award Winner for Visual Excellence