2019 Craftsmanship Awards Winners


A next to the project name indicates that the project was nominated for the special Star Award

Concrete

Cast-in-Place Concrete

Walter Canales, Julio Estrada, Santos Fuentes, Wigberto Hernandez, Miguel Mendez, Jose Paz - Clark Concrete Contractors, LLC

Project Name: Inova Proton Therapy Center, Falls Church, VA
Architect: Stantec
Engineer: Goldstein-Milano, LLC
General Contractor: Clark Construction Group, LLC
The Inova Proton Therapy Center is a 38,000 square foot space, all of which is dedicated to supporting the operation of two treatment rooms. The cast-in-place concrete structure sits on 83 caissons. The structure includes 12,000 cubic yards of concrete and 750 tons of steel. The cyclotron produces a high rate of radiation that is shielded by the mass concrete structure. The concrete walls around the cyclotron area are up to 16' thick and the slab direct above the cyclotron is a 20' thick mass concrete slab. All of the walls within the cyclotron and gantry areas are concrete. Due to the nature of the equipment, there is a large mechanical and electrical infrastructure in the building.

Elmer Abarca, Emilio Calderon, Kelvin Castillo, Jose A. Diaz, Jose Garcia, Santos Torres - The Lane Construction Corporation

Project Name: Kennedy Center Expansion, Washington, DC
Architect: Steven Holl Architects
Engineer: Silman
General Contractor: The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
The Kennedy Center Expansion project, designed by renowned architect Steven Holl, is an impressive concrete structure certain to awe its visitors. The visual appeal and craftsmanship is evident just by driving by on I-66 or Rock Creek Parkway. The facility houses rehearsal, events, educational and functional spaces with the signature elements being three white concrete pavilions that rise out above the green roof plaza. One must really tour this project to obtain a full appreciation for the level of craftsmanship it took to pull this structure off.

Gustavo Chavarria, Ian Dunn, Nestore Galati, Matt Peyton, Bob St. John, Abel Valdez - Structural

Project Name: Alexander Court, Washington, DC
Architect: FOX Architects
Engineer: Rathgeber/Goss Associates
General Contractor: DAVIS Construction
The scope of work included adding four floors of long-span structural steel framing and a new mechanical system, while maintaining and phasing the removal of the existing penthouse equipment. Seven elevators were vertically expanded and modernized, two garage shuttles added, two escalators added and cab finishes replaced in seven 200I K Street elevators. The combined building features a stunning 25,000-SF main lobby with statuary marble walls, acoustic wood ceiling and other high-end finishes spanning two levels, as well as a 12-story glass atrium.

Mackie Jenkins, Carlos Mercado, JP Monroy, Rigoberto Ruiz, Alfredo Ventura, Jose Villalobos - Baker DC

Project Name: West Half Residential, Washington, DC
Architect: Eric Colbert & Associates PC
Engineer: SK&A Structural Engineers
General Contractor: HITT Contracting
One of the main features of The West Half Street Project is the shifting of the floor plate halfway up the structure allowing residents on the east face of the building to have an unobstructed view to the stadium. As the building floors shifted, the footprint of each floor remained relatively consistent leading to extensive cantilevered slabs over the interior courtyard of the building. Each apartment on the eastern face of the building features a balcony with planter wall and glass railing that was unique from every other apartment unit. Baker used BIM to help coordinate the complicated work each balcony presented.

Precast Concrete

David (Doc) Burkhardt, Danny Cabrera, Jaime Paz, Ariel Perez - EDI/DLM Contractors, LLC

Project Name: The Boro Blocks A&B, McLean, VA
Architect: Shalom Baranes Architects
Structural Engineer: Tadjer Cohen Edelson Associates
General Contractor: Clark Construction Group, LLC
The month of October 2018 was a particularly difficult month. The project had a set deadline to complete the precast and take the cranes down, and was facing nearly 800 panels left to put on the building. OLM stepped up their manpower and as precast finally came to the job in waves continued to set 12 hours a day on A 1 and 17 hours a day on A2, 7 days a week. When A2 installation completed on October 24, the night crew on A2 transitioned to day shifts on A 1 with a one day break. Installation continued 24 hours a day with the last piece set at midnight on October 31, just in time to meet the project's deadline.

Mario Forlenza, Eric Young - Modern Mosaic Ltd.

Project Name: 700 Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, DC
Architect: Gensler
General Contractor: Clark Construction Group, LLC
700 Pennsylvania Avenue is a mixed-use six story building in historic Eastern Market that combines residential, office and retail space. Modern Mosaic was hired to provide all precast architectural concrete and thin brick veneer to complete this desired look. They fabricated the real brick and cut down to a thin size (3/4" to 1" thick) that could be cast into precast. The decision to choose precast over brick was so the brick mason could achieve the desired sloping elements the architect was looking for.

Special Concrete Finishes

John Rosewag, Russell Reeder, Roberto Velasquez, Jose Urquilla, Willie Urquilla, Jose Zelaya - Clark Concrete Contractors, LLC

Project Name: Glenstone II Museum, Potomac, MD
Architect: Thomas Phifer and Partners
Engineer: SOM
General Contractor: HITT Contracting
Coordinating with the precast and curtain wall subcontractor, Clark Concrete created an exact concrete model from the contract documents. The precast and curtain wall subcontractors modeled their systems on our concrete model and ran clash detection to ensure that the concrete as shown on the contract documents interfaced properly with the other finishes. Pour cards were created with sign off from all interfacing trades prior to executing the work. The pour cards were then used as a quality control measure to ensure that all components were accurately installed prior to concrete placement.

Doors and Windows

Exterior Glass

Jose Cabrera, Roger Compton, Chuck Mills, George Seward, Brian Webber - Custom Glass Services, Inc.

Project Name: International Spy Museum, Washington, DC
Architect: Hickok Cole
Engineer: SK&A Structural Engineers
General Contractor: Clark Construction Group, LLC
The complexity of the system did not end with the design, as craftsmen from Custom Glass were challenged to install this system by using mobile cranes and boom lifts at heights of up to 140 feet. Installation began with the top beam, which needed to be set in a precise location, as the entire steel and glass system would be supported from this structural element. This was done by using 3-D coordinates and templates. Installers were handling large materials including 3,400 pounds of steel beams up to 34 feet in length and glass panels that weighed up to 1,700 pounds, which added to the coordination and safety measures that were necessary.

Nathaniel Caldwell, Sherman Conner, Doug Fink, Kevin Horan, Gerardo Ruiz, Paul Welch - TSI Corporations

Project Name: Brendan Iribe Center for Computer Science & Engineering, College Park, MD
Architect: HDR, Inc.
General Contractor: The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
The Brendan Iribe Center for Computer Science and Engineering is a unique building due to the structure's unorthodox geometric shape. Located right at the main entrance to the University of Maryland, College Park campus, this six story educational center catches the eye of all those who pass by. Much of the attention is drawn to the impressive and intricate glass curtain wall system. Resembling the shape of a boomerang in plain view, the Iribe building shows off the detailed design, engineering and craftsmanship. The unitized curtain wall system is made up of roughly 1,500 stacked curtain wall "units" that span floors 1 through 5 and wrap the building's façade.

Aaron Boots, Darryl Cross, Jody Davis, Travis Ellenberger, Thomas Miller, Valiq Rogers - Harmon, Inc.

Project Name: Alexander Court, Washington, DC
Architect: FOX Architects
General Contractor: DAVIS Construction
Harmon fabricated and installed the curtainwall at Alexander Court. Harmon's curtainwall and stick built storefronts are installed with tight tolerances. To overcome the existing conditions of the renovated building, Harmon was able to work tolerances into the curtainwall that allow for a very leveled and aligned aesthetic, despite the building slab edge's relatively large variance. External accent features designed into the building aesthetics were installed in a manner that embraces the architect's design intent.
Star Award Nominee

Anthony Berkemeier, Evan George, Viktor Voznyuk - Novum Structures LLC

Project Name: Alexander Court, Washington, DC
Architect: FOX Architects
General Contractor: DAVIS Construction
Novum provided the skylight and tension cable facade that create the jewel box 12-story atrium and two-story main lobby space. The transition from skylight to 12-story wall and into the two-story system gives the look of a continuous material shaping the space. The flawless installation gives the feeling as if the facade is not interrupting the interior space from the exterior. Installation of this system between two existing structures was a major challenge. With use of a tower crane and 12-story scaffolding, Novum moved quickly through their high-quality installation. With the 12-story scaffolding scheduled to be removed after installation, and limited access afterward, getting the installation right the first time was imperative.

Chris Bast, Andrew Boncal, Louie Ceraldi, Silvio Orozco, Steven Raye, Robert Willis - Enclos Corp.

Project Name: Capital One Block B, McLean, VA
Architect: HKS, PC
Engineer: Curtainwall Design Consultants
General Contractor: DAVIS Construction
The unique design and construction on the Tower Curtainwall System were the fly-by curtainwall units at two corners and tapering horizontal accent. The unitized corner fly-by units are a unique design that were shop assembled in a "T" section with an internal steel structure and exposed horizontal aluminum strut. This created a self-supporting fly-by portion of the unitized curtainwall unit that does not require exposed structural steel penetrating the air vapor barrier of the curtainwall unit. The challenge was the shop assembly of the "T" shaped unitized curtainwall unit. This was accomplished in the shop by means of a rotisserie type fixture so that the "T" shaped unit could be rotated for shop personnel to access the work.
Star Award Nominee

Erik Barriga, Rafael Cordero, Alejandro Loyola, Rob Marsh, Ernie Ney, Matt Willison - Service Glass Industries, Inc.

Project Name: Reston Excelsior Parc, Reston, VA
Architect: R2L:Architects
General Contractor: John Moriarty & Associates of VA, LLC
Reston Excelsior Parc consists of two 16 story residential buildings built over a shared garage and connected at the ground level by a 2-story lobby. There are 457 residential units and the façade is made up of over 3,000 pieces of glass. Service Glass installed over 100,000 square feet of glass on this project including slab to slab window wall on all residential levels and 18’ tall curtainwall at the ground level amenity space. The project featured floor plans where windows do not stack and are only separated by a 7” tall slab edge cover. Quality of craftsmanship was critical for the windows to look uniform since any variation in plumb or level would be apparent to the eye. Service Glass’ foremen on the project surveyed every opening on every floor to within 1/16” to ensure the windows would be properly installed.
Star Award Nominee

Electrical

Lighting Systems

Michael Callaway, Bryan Fraley, Roberto Merlos, James O'Donnell, Alejandro Perez, Timothy Stull - J.E. Richards Electric, Inc.

Project Name: CARR Properties Midtown, Washington, DC
Architect: Michael Graves Architecture & Design
Engineer: Vanderweil
General Contractor: Clark Construction Group, LLC
As the floors were still being built, 4” conduit and all other sized conduits were being installed all over the building for pathways to supply switchgears, panels, etc. Well before the topping out party, we had to use a crane in order to get material to the upper floors, as we had no elevator to use. The crane operator was very helpful with this task, as we had to haul transformers, panels and wire wheels up. Before framing was installed, we were pulling homerun circuits and prepping electric rooms. Conduit paths for home runs was strategically installed in the concrete slab with precise locations. Soon enough framing started and the building started to have some character.

Taurus Carroll, James Johnson, Patrick Landers, Ryan Simpson, Brian Smith, Jr., Michael Weinfeld - J.E. Richards Electric, Inc.

Project Name: Wizards Practice Facility, Washington, DC
Architect: Rossetti
Engineer: Setty
General Contractor: Smoot Gilbane a Joint Venture
The Lighting system for DC ESA is uniquely made up of five different systems that were completed from start to finish in just under five months. Since this was a design build project, Richards had to coordinate with not only the lighting equipment vendors, but also the general contractor, architects and engineers to fully realize the intent of each system in the building. Specialized cables and interfaces were used to ensure that there would be total control of each system from one common point in the audio visual room. Our craftsmen provided the expertise to install this very technical system.

John Canterbury, Candido Gutierrez, Eric Kusi, Rob Martin, Jeff Viering, John Witsman - VarcoMac Electrical Construction Co.

Project Name: Confidential Client - Phase 3, Washington, DC
Architect: OPX Architecture/Interiors
Engineer: GHT Ltd.
General Contractor: HITT Contracting
The light fixtures were high quality and the controls were very complex. The installation and finished product looked great with the sonaspray on concrete deck ceilings. Light fixture drivers and controls were prefabricated and integrated where possible. The open ceiling concept presented a challenge to conceal components and keep the installation uncluttered, so the Lutron control components were installed in very limited space within electric rooms. This allows for ease of service when necessary and provides flexibility for future needs.

Kenny Fowler, Jonys Lobo, Oscar Lobo, Ryan Potts, Juan Quintanilla, Millard Voigt - Mona Electric Group

Project Name: Capital One Block B, McLean, VA
Architect: HKS, PC
Engineer: WSP Group
General Contractor: DAVIS Construction
The lighting system at Capital One is massive and includes over 30,000 light fixtures and several different lighting control systems. The project incorporated all styles of fixtures, including many decorative and specialty fixtures requiring quality coordination and installation skills. In order to help achieve the LEED Gold certification, the project utilized primarily LED lighting requiring extensive low voltage wiring and driver placement planning. In addition, the building utilizes the latest technologies in daylight harvesting, occupancy sensors and lighting control.

Matt Grady, Chuck Rhoads, Thomas St. John - Mona Electric Group

Project Name: National Law Enforcement Museum, Washington, DC
Architect: Davis Buckley Architects and Planners
Engineer: Loring Consulting Engineers
General Contractor: Clark Construction Group, LLC
Lighting package contained over 1,100 individual fixtures made up of 48 different base building fixture types and 37 different exhibits lighting fixture types. This included fixtures in nearly every application: exterior/site, office lay-in, mechanical space general lighting, track lighting, architectural down lighting (plaster & drywall), custom cove lighting, theatrical lighting, museum display/exhibit lighting, pendants, etc. An ETC lighting control system was provided (relay and dimming), consisting of 2 normal power panels (3 racks each) and 2 emergency panels, split into two separate closets with communication tie-in between the two closets; over 170 different circuits.

Aaron Cohen, Dave Levean, Eddie Nunez, Jody Ruffner, Chris Scott, Doug Thomas - Power Solutions, LLC

Project Name: Academies of Loudoun, Leesburg, VA
Architect/Engineer: Stantec Architecture
General Contractor: Holder Construction Company
The light fixture package for this project was quite extensive, including the installation of 2,800 interior and 300 exterior state of the art LED light fixtures and a complex digital network lighting control system. This system provides both energy savings and increased user configurability by cost effectively integrating time-based, daylight-based, sensor-based and manual lighting control schemes. Each light fixture controlled by this system has its own individual address to allow flexibility for manual and automatic lighting control schemes. Each photo sensor interfaced light fixture is able to maximize the light output, automatic continuous dimming, and reduce as needed based on the amount of available daylight in the space through windows.

Power Generation, Distribution and Switchgear

Timmy Burke, Clint Cantrell, Mounir Dourrachad, Rick Lee, Billy Miskovic, Russell Sullivan - Mona Electric Group

Project Name: WMATA Andrews Federal Center Bus Garage, Suitland, MD
Architect/Engineer: Systra Consulting
General Contractor: Hensel Phelps
This design build electrical system included three unit substations with three 1500 kw generators providing 100% back up power. Special considerations included a Class 1 Division 2 hazardous zone 18" from finished floor and a 18" zone from the ceiling. The incoming 13,200 volts of power is distributed to the three substations and over 100 electrical panels. With over 500,000 ft. of conduit and 2.5 million ft. of wire, the power is distributed to over 350 industrial pieces of equipment including lifts, overhead doors, parts cleaners, compressors, welders, paint booths, cranes, bus wash, lube systems, fueling systems and numerous miscellaneous equipment. Also, included are hundreds of pieces of mechanical equipment and pathways for the data and telephone systems.

Charles Barber, Jr., Victor Flores, Kevin Ford, Shawn Neylon, Daniel Paredes, Rafael Sanchez - J.E. Richards Electric, Inc.

Project Name: MedImmune Electrical Consolidation, Gaithersburg, MD
Architect/Engineer: SmithGroupJJR
General Contractor: Buch Construction
The first goal entailed taking 10 existing incoming feeds from the utility provider that consisted of 480 volt and 13,200 volt feeders and convert them to a dual utility fed 13,200 volt substation located in the basement of the main building. The second goal involved incorporating the two 3 megawatt 13,200 volt generators, 2.5 megawatt CHP and three other 480 volt generators (two 1500 kw & one 1000 kw) into a system that can provide a reliable back up system for the campus in the event of emergencies. The final goal was to provide a system that can be utilized to support the needs of a growing campus. The new consolidation gear is capable of up to 22 megawatts at 13,200 volts and the paralleling gear with it is capable of matching that with the capacity to have seven generators synced together.

Brian Benson, Jason Ketchel, Kenny Kronk, Nicholas Moses, James O'Donnell, Eric Richards - J.E. Richards Electric, Inc.

Project Name: CARR Properties Midtown, Washington, DC
Architect: Michael Graves Architecture & Design
Engineer: Vanderweil
General Contractor: Clark Construction Group, LLC
As the floors were still being built, 4” conduit and all other sized conduits were being installed all over the building for pathways to supply switchgears, panels, etc. Well before the topping out party, we had to use a crane in order to get material to the upper floors, as we had no elevator to use. The crane operator was very helpful with this task, as we had to haul transformers, panels and wire wheels up. Before framing was installed, we were pulling homerun circuits and prepping electric rooms. Conduit paths for home runs was strategically installed in the concrete slab with precise locations. Soon enough framing started and the building started to have some character.

Wayne Kirkpatrick, Richard LaDow, Phillip McDonald, Kevin Patterson, Scott Smith, Ben Staniewicz - C3M Power Systems, LLC

Project Name: Rehabilitation of Orange Blue Line Metrorail System Stadium Armory, Washington, DC
Engineer: Electrical Systems, Inc.
General Contractor: Clark Construction Group, LLC
The most difficult challenges encountered on the 081 project involved scheduling, limited access and maintaining metro services during construction. These challenges became C3M's greatest successes. C3M discretely and successfully replaced critical power infrastructure without disrupting service throughout the completion of the project. Keeping WMATA systems operational during work required temporary control and power configurations, detailed coordination between utility companies, WMATA and C3M, and expert electricians capable of preforming high intensity, detailed work during metro's slim nonrevenue hours.

Butch Hawkins, Mike Hefflin, Dave Maus, Brandon McLellan, Tim Quillen, Bill Raff - VarcoMac Electrical Construction Co.

Project Name: Confidential Client - Data Hall Suite, Ashburn, VA
Architect: Herring & Trowbridge Architects
Engineer: H.F. Lenz Company
General Contractor: HITT Contracting
This is a data hall fit out including the installation of five 3750kVA utility transformers, five 3MW generators, five generator switchboards and five UPS skid lineups, each consisting of a 400A auto transfer service switchboard, 3000A UPS switchboard, and two 100kVA UPS lineups. Eight miles of feeder MC cable was installed in three tiers of cable tray, three trays wide from the gear lineups to the forty PDU's, fifty CRAC units, generator panels, UPS panels, and various other house panels. Two miles of 1000 mcm XHHW was installed in cable bus from the generators and utility transformers to the UPS skid lineups. The project schedule allowed 13 weeks from mobilization to start of commissioning. The CRAC were delivered very late, which delayed the installation of the feeder MC cable by four weeks. Despite this, the original project milestones were maintained.

Rob Adair, Tim Edney, Allan Harrison - VarcoMac Electrical Construction Co.

Project Name: Alexandria House Switchgear Replacement, Alexandria, VA
Engineer: RMF Engineering
VarcoMac completed the removal of existing switchboards and replaced one 4000AMP 120/208VOLT switchgear and one 6000AMP 277/480VOLT switchgear in an occupied 208 unit, 23 story condo building. There were tight time constraints for each replacement, which required detailed planning and a high level of skill to complete on time. The first replacement was completed in 12 hours and the second in 16 hours. During the replacement of the high voltage switchgear, a generator was brought in to supply temporary power to run elevators and emergency power, including fire alarm systems and domestic water.

Matt Ferguson, Donald Fitzhugh, Patrick V. Latham III, Justin Lee, Steven Preston, Dylan Rupard - Mona Electric Group

Project Name: Cannon House Office Building Renewal, Phase 1, Washington, DC
Architect: Shalom Baranes Associates
Engineer: James Posey & Associates
General Contractor: Clark/Christman, a Joint Venture
Phase 1 included a total renovation of the largest wing of the Cannon House Office Building. The entire 5th floor was removed and rebuilt under a TRE (temporary roof enclosure). While the renovation work was being performed, the remaining wings connecting to this wing had to stay energized requiring circuits/feeders, all while remaining transparent to members of congress and their staff. The conduit system for the power required heavy coordination to maintain the historic preservation of the building and required a lot of work to be performed off hours. Some of the difficulties included penetrating thick walls, some as deep as 5 feet, and single point entry into the rooms due to the existing building structure.

Dwight Bennett, Matthew Christian, Richard King, Brett Sofley, Andrew Talcott, Barry Williams - Dynalectric Company

Project Name: Sabey Data Center, Ashburn, VA
Architect: Salas O'Brien
Engineer: Southland Engineering
General Contractor: Sabey Construction
The general foreman was able to plan and schedule the electrical work to a high level of accuracy, due in large part to maximizing the underground conduit installation and through careful coordination of the overhead work prior to equipment arriving. Once the equipment arrived, Dynalectric had sufficient time to complete the remainder of the work to a high level of craftsmanship. A notable problem that had to be navigated was the late delivery of critical-path equipment. With a completion date that was not negotiable, Dynalectric coordinated a re-sequenced equipment turnover schedule so critical equipment could be energized and completed on time.

William Brown, Sam Bumgardner, Jr., Tom Crown, Brad Duker, Nick Thompson, Edward V. Turner - Dynalectric Company

Project Name:  QTS  Project Joshua, Sterling, VA
Architect: Corgan
Engineer: H.F. Lenz Company
General Contractor: Turner Construction Company
The project required nearly 300 Dynalectric electricians working seven days a week with two shifts to meet the aggressive milestones. Many difficult challenges were faced by the electrical team to meet an exceptionally high-speed schedule while adapting to a changing environment deriving from tens of thousands of document revisions through RFI and addendums. The project included over 100,000' of large duct bank conduit, over 500,000' of overhead conduit, and over 2,000,000' of wire to support the initial build out of 10MW consisting of six 34.5kV MV switches, five 3500kVA transformers, five 3750kVA generators, ten 1MW UPS systems, twenty four static transfer switches, twenty four 500kVA power distribution units, 3000A critical power reserve busway, 1200A mechanical power reserve busway, and house power distribution.

Reid Bowen, Isiah Brown, William Bruce, Patrick Gardiner, Jose Orellana, Daniel Stamp - Mona Electric Group

Project Name: Capital One Block B, McLean, VA
Architect: HKS, PC
Engineer: WSP Group
General Contractor: DAVIS Construction
There were several challenges presented to our team throughout the installation process including scheduling and material handling constraints, phased turnover requirements and routing the large quantity of bus duct through limited spaces. Perhaps the pinnacle challenge was getting the central plant, which was located in the penthouse levels on the top floors, installed and operational within a short 3 month period in order to condition the building and meet commissioning and turnover requirements. Between coordinating, installing, testing and commissioning the massive amount of equipment in this consolidated area, our electricians also had to navigate around other tradesman and their equipment under the same deadlines. It was team work at its finest.

Sean Barrett, James Bradfield, Channing Crawford, Robert Denekas, Charles "Chappy" Knaack, Juan Ventura - Power Solutions, LLC

Project Name: QTS - Project Acadia PH1, Manassas, VA
Architect: Corgan
Engineer: KW Mission Critical Engineering
General Contractor: DPR Construction
Power Solutions completed the installation and integration of 2 electrical rooms and 1 data room, which consisted of 27,000-square feet, within an 18-week construction schedule. The project also consisted of the base building infrastructure and the exterior equipment yard. The project encountered severe weather delays that effectively shut the job site down for 3.5 weeks in the early part of the schedule. The customer’s deadline remained the same and the team worked to develop and implement a recovery schedule. As a result, crews worked both extended single shift hours and double shift hours to complete this work per the original schedule. Single shifts were used until the electrical room equipment was set, at which point double shifts were implemented to complete the project under the severely compressed construction schedule.

Special Systems

Mustapha Boujadi, Jamal Boussakri, Kenneth Higgins, Timothy Jacobs, Davis Poblador, Edwin Reyes-Saravia - J.E. Richards Electric, Inc.

Project Name: CARR Properties Midtown, Washington, DC
Architect: Michael Graves Architecture & Design
Engineer: Vanderweil
The fire alarm system installed for this building is a Siemens XLS multi node system. There are a total of 5 nodes. Node I is the backbone of the system and contains the main fire panel and 9 other transponders throughout the building. The 4 other nodes utilize VESDA systems (Very Early Smoke Detection Apparatus) in MDF rooms throughout the complex to monitor and activate self-contained pre action and gas suppression systems. The complete system monitors and controls 10 VESDA systems, over 2,300 notification devices and over 1,000 initiating devices. There is over 40 miles of cable throughout the building to make this system complete

Michael Garvey, Chol Song, Mike Vanduzer - Mona Electric Group

Project Name: WMATA Andrews Federal Center Bus Garage, Suitland, MD
Architect/Engineer: Systra Consulting
General Contractor: Hensel Phelps
This was a design-build project. The fire alarm/gas detection system is a network addressable systems utilizing fiber optic interconnection linking the administration/maintenance building, fuel/wash building and the site entrance guard station. The system employs electronic horn audible notification, voice audible notification in selected areas and pre-alert gas detection notification. This notification arrangement requires a higher level of technical expertise to ensure that all components are interfaced properly and operate according to the unique sequence of operation. The fire alarm/gas detection system is interfaced with over 100 roll-up doors, over 25 emergency exhaust fans and 11 points of interface for power shutdown to accommodate the gas detection sequence in multiple areas.

William Artis, Jeff Baggarly, Marvin Barnett, Tanya Filkins, Doug Leggat, Dustin O'Hara - Dynalectric Company

Project Name: Non-Disclosed Client, Ashburn, VA
Architect: DVA Architects
Engineer: CCG Facilities Integration
General Contractor: Holder Construction Company
The accelerated schedule required completing the wiring installation in a three month window after the precast building shell was completed so the rotary unit and switchgear could be energized for startup, testing and commissioning. Utilizing underground wiring pits under the rotary UPS switchgear compartments and the rotary unit allowed manufactured wiring cable assemblies designed by Dynalectric to be pulled into the pits ahead of setting the equipment in place. ACC 10 used a total of 1,444,800' (276 miles) of control wiring for the rotary UPS system pulled in an underground conduit system designed to eliminate exposed conduit runs and schedule delays.

Finishes

Ceramic Tile and Terrazo

Guillermo Briones, Bruce Schmidt - Lach Tile

Project Name: Eaton Hotel, Washington, DC
Architect: CallisonRTKL
General Contractor: HITT Contracting
Lach Tile was exceptional throughout the hotel project's duration. The degree of difficulty was incredible and installer was tasked with producing multiple different tile finishes adjacent to each other, with dozens of different kinds used in different spaces throughout the hotel. The installation of the mosaic wall tile on the roof was extremely difficult, but the team at Lach Tile rose to the occasion and did an incredible job. Their professionalism and quality of work is shown throughout in both guestrooms and public spaces.

Carlos A. Amaya, Edgar A. Carreto-Ramos, Robert D. Redden, Pablo Torres, Jose G. Varela, Marcos Villafuerte - Boatman and Magnani Inc

Project Name: American Geophysical Union Renovation, Washington, DC
Architect: Hickok Cole
Engineer: Interface Engineering
This unique terrazzo project required saving the original 1st floor lobby stone flooring inlay and installing new terrazzo flooring in the areas surrounding the original inlay. The work included a new stairway leading to new terrazzo on the lower level and conference room tops. All materials used in the new terrazzo were required to be salvaged from the existing building materials to be demolished. In order to yield 16,000 lbs of terrazzo aggregates, our craftsmen were tasked with removing from the site the existing granite paving, public toilets from the restrooms and tempered glass from the existing windows. Each material was carefully crushed, weighed and bagged.

Johnny Antezana, Reidy Vasquez Arias, Ariel Cespedes, Candelaro Rivera Hernandez, Fidel Sandoval Mendoza, Juan J. Rodriguez - Boatman and Magnani Inc

Project Name: The Unisphere - Phase 3 - NetZero Headquarters, Silver Spring, MD
Architect: EwingCole
General Contractor: The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
This project includes an elliptical pool in the lobby/atrium that is not your typical pool, but one that has a moveable floor. The moveable pool floor was designed into the project to accommodate different activities simultaneously or at varying depths. The floor floats and is held in place at different levels by cables that allow the operator to adjust the floor. With the sophistication of this pool design, there was a need for a detailed, complex tile installation. The acceptable construction tolerances required the installation crew a much tighter than standard tile installation project. The craftsmen had to produce a perfectly plumb wall, a perfectly level movable floor and a perfectly level surrounding deck in order for the movable floor to operate and be successful.
Star Award Nominee

Fabio Amaya, Koffitsey Atandji, Bruce Clauser, Jose Flores, Jose Rey-Rivas, Rafael Rosales - Roman Mosaic & Tile Company

Project Name: Parcel One Office Building at District Wharf, Washington, DC
Architect: Kohn Pederson Fox Associates, PC
General Contractor: Balfour Beatty
The 1000 Maine office building boasts unique and challenging construction components, including terra cotta accent projections on the curtainwall facade (which also includes glass and aluminum elements), a sawtooth stone wall in the lobby and an isolation concrete slab in the second-floor fitness center. 1 000 Maine features 6,000 square feet of white terrazzo, which seamlessly connects the north and south side of the main lobby. The terrazzo shines and reflects the sunlight that enters through the floor-to-ceiling glass walls, catching the mirror and crystal pieces spread throughout the flooring and creating a sense of connection to the outdoors.

Carlos A. Amaya, Eric R. Blanco, Edgar A. Carreto-Ramos, Emerson Lopez-Perez, Carlos H. Blanco Romero, Ronald Wondoloski - Boatman and Magnani Inc.

Project Name: National Law Enforcement Museum, Washington, DC
Architect: Davis Buckley Architects and Planners
General Contractor: Clark Construction Group, LLC
Boatman & Magnani installed the poured-in-place terrazzo floor and the grand entrance stairs at the National Law Enforcement Museum. The terrazzo, which is in the main entrance lobbies as well as across the entire ticketing level, is comprised of a complex radial geometry in a non-rectilinear space. The tangentially-intersecting radial strips, which at times were broken by architectural features and walls, mandated precise layout by the craftsman to ensure the critical alignments with adjacent finishes per architectural intent.

Lisandro Guevara Acosta, Fabio Amaya, AJ Applegarth, Nestor Campos, Saul Lopez, - Roman Mosaic & Tile Company

Project Name: Inova Schar Cancer Institute, Falls Church, VA
General Contractor: Clark Construction Group, LLC
A majority of the Inova Schar Cancer Institute lobby consists of a new steel and structural glass structure built to serve as the facility's main entrance. The structure was built on top of an existing below grade structure. After all overhead work on the structure was completed, the team cleared space to begin prep work for the terrazzo flooring. The terrazzo flooring was installed on top of newly poured slabs and was also on top of a space that was once a garage space, then was converted into lab space and a waiting area that opens into the main lobby. The difference of eight inches between new topping slabs and existing garage slabs had to be slopped at several locations to hide the appearance of grade changes

Drywall

Anthony Cassette, Roberto Garcia, Thomas Hurlock, Roger Marsden, Orlando Rivera, Juan Veizaga - C.J. Coakley Co., Inc.

Project Name: Historic Center Building, Phase 2 Consolidation of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, Washington, DC
Architect: Shalom Baranes Associates
General Contractor: Grunley Construction Company, Inc.
C.J. Coakley’s history of craftsmanship is evident throughout the Historic Center Building project. While the original building’s existing core was entirely dismantled, the goal of this project was to re-create new interiors within a historic facade. The inspiration of the original architecture was to be preserved. C.J. Coakley’s team achieved this goal through the integration of the new finishes and the addition of replicated historic elements. The build-back was complex and demanded a tremendous amount of manpower. After the exterior façade was restored, insulation had to be added and integrated within the existing walls and windows, and new inner framing and drywall. This required complex sequencing of work to achieve the project’s sustainability goals.

Roberto Castro, Gino Contreras, Jordan Eustaquio, Juan Flores, Roberto Jaramillo, David Orazco - Anning Johnson Company

Project Name: Nestle Headquarters, Arlington, VA
Architect: Gensler
Engineer: GHT Ltd.
General Contractor: DAVIS Construction
Anning Johnson suggested the use of PermaBase Flex Cement Board for the Nestle Headquarters eight-story helical curved stair system, which was not a perfect spiral and required bending drywall from a radius as small as 1’ out to 16'-6". The installation achieved the desired level five, very smooth finish that received an eggshell paint finish in an area with a high exposure to daylight. The installer had the ability to achieve tight inside curves as well as softer exterior curvature of the stair with little to no flaws or areas to repair. Anning Johnson worked in sequence from top down, often over openings in the floor with proper safety equipment, and successfully coordinated with the lighting, glass, stone and ornamentals metals trades to complete their work simultaneously.
Star Award Winner for Visual Excellence

Jesus Avelar, Marcelino Avelar, Marvin Herrera, Jhonny Mendez, Walter Moreno, Dave Parkhurst - Tri-State Drywall, Inc.

Project Name: Capital One Block B, McLean, VA
Architect: CallisonRTKL
General Contractor: DAVIS Construction
The project encompassed new construction of a high-rise office building with curtainwall facade and a steel-framed 70' curtainwall extension crown. The development consists of a 31-story office tower and six-story podium base, which features ground level lobby, support services, retail and parking circulation. The building's base MEP system include a central chilled water plant with indoor floor-by-floor chilled water AHU's and fan-powered terminals. The parking structure includes three above-grade and 2.5 below-grade levels. The facility will feature a conference level with landscaped roof terrace, an amenity level with a green roof, an above-street pedestrian connector and stand-alone retail structure.

Bill Fortner, Luther Laing, Cam Sokoloff - Capitol Drywall, Inc.

Project Name: 2501 M Street, Washington, DC
Architect: CORE Architects
General Contractor: DAVIS Construction
2501 M Street was primarily a retrofit, including demolition of the interiors and skin of the first five floors of an eight-story building. Project included expanding the slabs with structural steel and concrete filled pan decks, and dressing the facade with floor to ceiling window walls and metal panels. Operating in the existing structure presented innumerable unknowns that needed to be addressed in sync with construction. The project also included the expansion of a two-story, sub-grade parking garage with a steel addition on top. This shut down skin work on the north elevation until the addition was complete.

Joseph Carlisle, Richard Crisler, Juan A. Curiel, Sergio Santiesteban, Ted Woodward, Jose A. Zalles - C.J. Coakley Co., Inc.

Project Name: Capital One Block B, McLean, VA
Architect: CallisonRTKL
General Contractor: DAVIS Construction
The quality of craftsmanship drew on the skills of framers, hangers and finishers. It was known in advance that the walls would need to be perfect to allow the unique geometry of the wall panels to interface with each other. If the walls were out of plane, the panels would not stack and the leaf interlacing would not be effective. To implement the construction, framing had to be precise. Due to the vertical lighting elements, C. J. Coakley needed to also hit custom framing patterns to align panel joints and light fixtures to allow this system to work. There was a sub layer of plywood that allowed the installer to secure the panels on any location. The panels also had to stack, and this stacking needed to be precise.

Pablo Acebo, Sergio Mendez - Dynamic Contracting

Project Name: National Law Enforcement Museum, Washington, DC
Architect: Davis Buckley Architects and Planners
General Contractor: Clark Construction Group, LLC
The most complex work carried out by Dynamic Contracting was in the museum's main theater, which includes an intricate geometry comprised of stepped walls, risers and multiple radii, both in the ceilings and walls. Dynamic finished the theater with fabric and wood acoustic panel systems on the walls and ceilings. The Decoustic Acoustic Fabric Panels surround the front and back of the theater and were installed after months of meticulous dimension verifications necessary to ensure the complex radial appearance for the theater. This geometry was accomplished for the critical alignments of the different finishes because of craftsmen's precise attention to detail.

Masonry

Interior Stone & Marble

Miguel A. Diaz Fuentes, Mayber Hernandez Larios, Daniel E. Mazariego, Wilfredo Orellana, Michael A. Wondoloski - R. Bratti Associates

Project Name: 1100 15th Street, Washington, DC
Architect: SHoP Architects
General Contractor: Clark Construction Group, LLC
Clark constructed an 875,000 square-foot office building with three levels of below-grade parking in Washington, D,C The 14-story' building replaced the existing Washington Post buildings and a neighboring office building, Fannie Mae is the lead tenant in the building, The structure features multiple three-story atria and includes 45,000 square feet of retail space on two levels, a rooftop terrace, a fitness center, a public courtyard, and a private alley, The building's façade is comprised of curtain wall, including multiple elevations of 3D panels with pre-patina copper cladding, assembled at varied depths to create a distinct pattern, Three bridges, highlighted with copper fins, each extend one hundred feet across an open plaza. R. Bratti Associates exceeded all expectations in procuring and installing the stone in both West and East Lobbies of Midtown Center.

Gilmer A. Guevara Aleman, William E. Orellana, Jose Alfredo Ornelas, Thomas F.J. Palovich - R. Bratti Associates

Project Name: Capital One Block B, McLean, VA
Architect: HKS, PC
General Contractor: DAVIS Construction
R. Bratti Associates performed exceptional work on all interior stone. The stone on this project was specifically selected through multiple trips to Italy and France. Stones were handpicked at quarries and dry lays were performed overseas to ensure that the patterns matched the architects' and owners' visions. The main lobby features over 70-feet of honed limestone on the walls. Flooring stone in the main lobby and sky lobbies consists of a mixture of a gray and white moonstone with black granite. Calacatta polished marble completes the inner radius of the sky lobby. All floor stone is installed over a radiant flooring bed with total thickness of the assembly ranging from 6" to 12" including insulation, setting bed, and stone.
Star Award Winner for Technical Excellence

Unit Masonry

Juan Conteras, Lance McCauley, Celso Nunez, Chris Payne, Stephen Sweeney - Diverse Masonry Corporation

Project Name: 700 Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, DC
Architect: Gensler
General Contractor: Clark Construction Group, LLC
700 Penn is a mixed-use development on Pennsylvania Avenue in the Capitol Hill neighborhood that combines residential, office and retail use between 7th and 8th Street SE, and between Pennsylvania and C Street, SE.
Amy Weinstein, an architect at Gensler, who has also designed 20 neighboring buildings in Capitol Hill, designed the facades multicolored bricks and arranged them in bold patterns to create the rustic feel of the historic neighborhood. Diverse Masonry planned the execution of the complex design by meeting with Amy Weinstein and Clark Construction in the early phases of construction to understand the vision and the challenges of the jobsite. They created a BIM model of the façade for these meetings to discuss their approach for construction and the challenges they would be faced with.

John Allers, Santos R. Benitez, Jim Connor, Robert Emerson, Jose Fernandez, - Genco Masonry, Inc.

Project Name: Brendan Iribe Center for Computer Science & Engineering, College Park, MD
Architect: HDR, Inc.
General Contractor: The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
This multi-radii faced structure is made up of roughly 50 different radii with both exterior and interior faces. The structure of the building's face is made up of a combination of cold formed metal framing and brick masonry. The installation of all of the brick and precast for the Antonov Auditorium facade was expertly performed by Genco Masonry. One particularly unique aspect to the auditorium's exterior structure is that it not only curves in plain view but also "rolls back" into the structure in elevation. In order to accomplish such a feat of craftsmanship, Genco had to create roughly 50 different wood templates in order to ensure the precision of the brick work as it wrapped around the building.

Blake Pappas, Michael Pappas, Jorge Pena, Fredy Quinones, Jose Valladares, Tranquilino Villegas - Telligent Masonry, LLC

Project Name: Signet, McLean, VA
Architects: Page Architects and Franck & Lohsen
General Contractor: DAVIS Construction
The all brick seven story project is made up of over 350,000 brick, 25,000 cast stone units, and 50,000 CMU. This masonry sensation is the ultimate luxurious place to own and most attractive place to live in the area. The building is so large that it had to be divided up into three zones with different crews working simultaneously on their own tight schedules. Consequently, the bulk of the skin was completed in approximately four months all throughout the winter. Davis and Telligent were able to turnover completed facades through sharp coordination with multiple trades. Furthermore, this allowed framing and air barrier trades to continue working at the same time as the masonry, harmonizing a fast-paced schedule and closing in the building ahead of time.

Juan Hernandez, Douglas Joya, Ricardo Moscoso, Blake Pappas, Michael Pappas, Tranquilino Villegas - Telligent Masonry, LLC

Project Name: The Signature at Reston Town Center, Reston, VA
Architect: Shalom Baranes Associates
Engineer: Thornton Tomasetti
General Contractor: HITT Contracting
The Reston Town Center area has exploded over the past several years creating a new city with numerous new office buildings, hotels, shops, and apartments. Covering an entire city block, the two tower 23-story The Signature Luxury Apartments contains over 900,000 oversized Norwegian brick and 130,000 CMU. The sheer size and intricate facades speak for themselves. The two towers, townhouses and six story garage had to be run simultaneously, requiring three different exterior masonry crews and two different scaffold crews to stay on the tight schedule. Due to the complexity of the project, Telligent had an onsite safety manager and six different foremen running the project: one on each tower, one running the garage interior and façade, one swing stage foreman, one fraco foreman, and a lead foreman.
Star Award Winner for Excellence in the Face of Adversity

Mechanical

HVAC-Piping

Michael Bennett, Chris Cook, James Crawford, Gino Depaz, Nerry Garcia, Jesse Vandevort - Shapiro & Duncan, Inc.

Project Name: GWU - Corcoran Shool of the Arts and Design, Washington, DC
Architect: Leo A Daly
Engineer: Mueller Associates
General Contractor: The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
Shapiro and Duncan was awarded all the mechanical and plumbing work for the project and work was performed over the span of almost 3 years. The building was fully occupied throughout the project, except for 3 months each summer. In all, 7 new air handling units were installed, five of which had integral ERVs. An additional 6 ERVs were also installed, 2 for new AHUs and 4 for existing AHUs. In addition, the scope included 8 separate VRF systems, numerous split systems, a new boiler plant, and a metal and wood dust collection system for the sculpture studios. Extensive modifications and upgrades were made to systems to remain in order to make them integral with the completely new BAS system.

Mark Bowen, Joe Gale, Jeff Latimer, Mike Mercure - Kent Island Mechanical

Project Name: Control Wing Basement & Chiller / Cooling Tower Modernization, Leesburg, VA
General Contractor: Grunley Construction Company, Inc.
Due to the extensive nature of the mechanical scope, Kent Island Mechanical was tasked with the majority of the scheduling, sequencing and coordination for the project. It cannot be overstated how sensitive and critical the ZDC FAA Facility operations are to aviation activities in the United States, as well as internationally. In July of 2016, during an unrelated project, a roofing contractor's fumes entered the control portion of the facility, which required the evacuation of the control wing for several hours. Not only did this evacuation immediately make national news, it also took more than 72 hours for flights around the world to recover from this outage. As a result, much of our project scheduling and phasing was under constant scrutiny and required the approval of multiple government employees.

Metals

Metal Panels

Elin Hernandez, Darry Miller, Clemente Sabillon, Jose Sabillon, Tyler Vogel, Dave Watson - Tecta America Architectural Metals

Project Name: International Spy Museum, Washington, DC
Architect: Hickok Cole
General Contractor: Clark Construction Group, LLC
Nominator: Clark Construction Group

Entry Code: B-02

Project Name: St. Matthew's Redevelopment, Washington, DC
Craft Employer: Metro Panels and Glass
Architect: Shalom Baranes Associates
General Contractor: Clark Construction Group, LLC
The metal panels on the International Spy Museum project make up the incredibly unique exterior of the building. The vast majority of the building is wrapped in Tecta America's custom metal panels, creating an extraordinary building that has changed the landscape of L'Enfant Plaza immensely. The most striking and complicated areas are the "Black Box" custom louvered panels covering the exhibit floors of the building and the ACM and corrugated panels on the east wall. There was an incredible amount of coordination involved with installing the Black Box panels.p

Ruben Altamirano, Wilber Cheguen, Rudy Espino, Elmer Menendez, Daniel Moreno, Candelario Antonio Rodriguez - IronShore Contracting, LLC

Project Name: Prince George's Community College - Lanham Hall Renovation/Addition, Largo, MD
Architect: Murphy & Dittenhafer Architects
General Contractor: Forrester Construction
The entire project involved the renovation of an existing warehouse built in 1960s and modernization to provide a fresh new structure featuring composite aluminum panels and zinc panels. The metal panel work on the project is the focal point of the building exterior. The craftsmanship with which the material was both fabricated and installed was exceptional. The scope of the project required all work to be completed on an already existing structure. The structural work was divided into two areas and all of the material was fabricated and precut in Canada. Since all material was precut, care had to be given to the field measurements and installation.

Miscellaneous Metal Fabrication

J. Benjamin Arellano, Antonio Avalos, Jamie Barton, Kapildeo Daitnarayan, Francisco Garcia, Jose Martinez - Extreme Steel, Inc.

Project Name: International Spy Museum, Washington, DC
Architect: Hickok Cole
Engineer: SK&A Structural Engineers
General Contractor: Clark Construction Group, LLC
Extreme Steel is provided the design assist, fabrication and installation of the feature stairs on the International Spy Museum. The staircase connects the exhibit floors and is suspended along the outside of the metal-paneled west facade and enclosed in a suspended glass feature called the Veil. Early in the design process, multiple mockups were fabricated for design team approval before fabrication began. Extreme Steel showed great attention to detail with their quality control process from the very beginning by focusing on welds, connection pieces and material quality.

Ornamental Metal

Joe Bailey, Michelle Bishop, Jose Escalante, Baudillio Garcia, Jayson Mapes, Phillip Stratton - Tate Ornamental, Inc.

Project Name: 1100 15th Street, Washington, DC
Architect: SHoP Architects
General Contractor: Clark Construction Group, LLC
The ornamental metals scope of work on Midtown Center was a unique challenge as the metals were widely varying in type and placed in small quantities around the entire job. The plaza features brass reveals at the columns, a stainless steel walkway over the fountain, and antiqued brass bollards along 15th St. and L St. The East and West Lobbies feature antiqued brass frames at all elevators and brass trims interwoven with the stone. The East Lobby features an additional leather and brass handrail at the stone steps. Each of the six below-grade garage elevator lobbies are accented with brass base trim. Mirrored stainless steel column covers enlarge the appearance of space in the Fitness Center while the blackened steel base trim ties the black storefront mullions in with the rest of the design. The North Alley features a brass handrail, more brass bollards and a steel and aluminum canopy.

Chris Bondura, Anthony Manago, Jesse Marks, Mike Marks, Stanley Murray, Stephen Pelo - Crescent Designed Metals

Project Name: Capital One Block B, McLean, VA
Architect: CallisonRTKL
General Contractor: DAVIS Construction
Crescent Designed Metals performed all ornamental metals on this job and did exceptional work. Fully exposed, structurally welded box beam/plate stringers were finished to NOMMA I standard to create a seamless box stringer. Close coordination and layout were required to match glass panel joints with millwork wall panels. Monumental and zipper stairs featured single center stringers with "floating treads." Consequently, the stairs had to be shop assembled in full sized jigs to maintain the tighter tolerances required for the wood and stainless steel finishes. Zipper stair installation required design of custom modular cantilevered rigging equipment with no opportunity for attachment to overhead structure. 20 zipper stairs necessitated that rigging be easily disassembled, movable and fit in elevator.

Structural Steel Framing

Bob Campbell, Mike Palmer, Kevin Rogers - Banker Steel Company and Sherman Hill, Cameron Maddox, John Manfredi - Williams Steel Erection Co.

Project Name: Dulles Corridor Metrorail Project Phase 2, Sterling, VA
Architect/Engineer: Dewberry
General Contractor: Capital Rail Constructors (Clark & Kiewit Joint Venture)
The Dulles Corridor Metrorail Project Phase 2 Package A is one of the largest and highest profile infrastructure projects taking place in the country today. Banker Steel Company (BSC) served as the lead structural steel fabricator for the Dulles Corridor Metrorail Project Ph-2, a scope that includes approximately 4,000 TN of steel across six metro-rail passenger stations, nine pavilion parking areas and thirty one pedestrian bridges. BSC hired Williams Steel Erection Company as their installer.

Mark Henderson, Cody Mann, Mike Palmer - Banker Steel Company

Project Name: Arlington Public Schools New School at the Wilson Site, Arlington, VA
Architect: BIG – Bjarke Ingels Group
Engineer: Silman
General Contractor: Gilbane Building Company
The design and construction team collaborated with Banker Steel Company to create a unique team that seamlessly integrated the design concepts to create a structure that the community will be proud of for years to come. The steel was an integral part of the design, ensuring the original concept could come to life. While most of the steel will be hidden, except exposed trusses above the theater, the steel structure is the foundation for the building’s aesthetics. The overall fanned card deck design created with the steel structure provides a unique interior and exterior space.

Sitework

Landscaping

Gerardo Arias, Charles Owen, Donald Smith, Oomer Syed - Fine Landscapes

Project Name: Capital One Block B, McLean, VA
Architect: HKS, PC
Civil Engineer/Landscape Architect: Gordon
General Contractor: DAVIS Construction
The quality of landscape installation begins with understanding the design intent of the project and then meeting and surpassing those expectations. The design included creating smaller intimate spaces along with larger gathering areas for potential performances. The principal design objective was to tie in the existing buildings to the new headquarters building through similar paving, hardscape materials, water features, opportunities for art, and most importantly plantings.

Jose Alvarez, Yovani Barrera, Burt Elder, Esteban Ornelas, Nelson Portillo, Victor Velasco - Chapel Valley Landscaping

Project Name: 700 Pennsylvania Avenue, Washington, DC
Architect: Gensler
Landscape Architect: Oehme, Van Sweden
General Contractor: Clark Construction Group, LLC
Chapel Valley Landscape Company worked on the exterior landscaping in the courtyard. The courtyard at 700 Penn is surrounded by the three buildings on the property which means that accessing the courtyard poses a challenge. The only means to accessing is through one of the residential buildings. As we moved through construction, there was no means of getting soil, plants, or trees into the courtyard unless we used a crane or walked through the residential buildings. Chapel Valley took on this challenge and carried or used a wheel barrow to transport all of the material directly through the lobby.

Underpinning, Foundations and Excavations

Paul Moroney - Superior Foundation, Inc.

Project Name: Alexander Court, Washington, DC
Architect: FOX Architects
Engineer: Rathgeber/Goss Associates
General Contractor: DAVIS Construction
2000 L St, NW involved very complicated scope elements that were both designed and performed by Superior Foundations. The project involved a four-story vertical expansion while the building was occupied. In order to accomplish the renovation, the existing building elevator machine room and portions of the penthouse needed to remain in place and operational. The old/to-be-removed penthouse was a post-tension structure. Superior Foundations designed and installed a temporary structure to "hang" the existing penthouse structure off a new vertical expansion structure.

Ramon Arevalo, Olsi Bokciu, Christopher Devine, Jose Fuentes, Bledar Hoti, Henry Robles - Steele Foundation LLC

Project Name: 11th and K Street Hotel, Washington, DC
Architect: Peter Fillat Architects
Engineer: Tadjer Cohen Edelson & Associates
General Contractor: CBG Building Company
The work included underpinning and shoring for preservation of the historic exterior facade of the 1015 K St building. The work is considered exceptional given the restricted access and sensitivity of the historic DC structure. Custom steel shoring frames were assembled on the exterior of the existing building to allow for demolition of the existing structural framing as interior access was restricted. Extreme care was necessary to safely support the existing exterior facade to allow for demolition and installation of the new structure. This project required the highest level of skill for craftsmen in the underpinning and shoring industry given the restricted access, sensitivity of the structure, and inherent risks involved with preserving the historic facades.

Charles Lackie, Gabe McClain, Larry Pitzer, Rick Robinson, David Stine - Guy F. Atkinson Construction

Project Name: MD355 Crossing (BRAC), Bethesda, MD
Engineer: MRCE
General Contractor: Clark Construction Group, LLC
The MD355 Crossing project involves the construction of two high speed elevators and a connector tunnel, with associated service rooms and egress stairs that services a new entrance into the WMATA Medical Center Metro Station. The project is located in Bethesda, Maryland adjacent to Walter Reed Nation Military Medical Center and across the street from National Institutes of Health campus. Clark contracted Guy F. Atkinson Construction ("Atkinson") to perform the rock excavation and initial support of the shaft and the connector tunnel. The scope of the project for Atkinson included the development of a 46-ft diameter shaft at 108' deep and a connector tunnel that included 60-ft of 39.5' x 38' horseshoe shaped tunnel leading into 27' of a 31.5' x 21' horseshoe shaped passageway connector tunnel.
Star Award Nominee

Hugh Campbell, Andres Cortez, Casey James, Kevin Randall, Dennis Sheehan, - Clark Foundations, LLC

Project Name: Suburban Hospital Campus Enhancements Project Phase 2, Bethesda, MD
General Contractor: Clark Construction Group, LLC
The Suburban Hospital Project is a culmination of several years of development and community interface that will allow the hospital to remain the pre-eminent community hospital in the Bethesda area. The scope of work entailed interior renovations and structural improvements to the existing hospital building, as well as a new addition. Clark Foundations worked on several unique, noteworthy aspects of the project. The west side of the site required that the crew connect to an existing support of excavation system (a dead man anchor system). This involved accurately locating the dead man tie rods, which were spaced seven feet on center, and drill a 36-inch diameter shaft between each one.

Nate Barksdale, Mike Conner, Issac Dance, Mauricio Rodriguez, Terrence Sumuel, Mike Waller - Clark Foundations, LLC

Project Name: The Wilson and The Elm at 7272 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD
Architect: Shalom Baranes Associates
Engineer: Tadjer Cohen Edelson & Associates
General Contractor: Clark Construction Group, LLC
The Project is located at 7272 Wisconsin Avenue, Bethesda, MD. This site was occupied by the Apex building, retail stores, and four levels below grade parking. The site is bounded to the east by Wisconsin Avenue, where the underground WMATA Redline tunnel and Bethesda Station are located, to the north by Elm Street where there is an active construction site for the new Purple Line station and track and to the south by existing buildings. The proposed building structure will have a footprint of approximately 75,000 square feet with 31 floors of above-grade office and residential space and four below-grade parking levels. The lowest parking level will generally have a finished floor elevation of EL 307 feet.

Nate Barksdale, Chris Moen, Travon Perkins, Kevin Randall, Peter Shirley, Encarnacion Velasquez - Clark Foundations, LLC

Project Name: 750 North Glebe, Arlington, MD
Architect: WDG Architecture, PLLC
General Contractor: Clark Construction Group, LLC
750 North Glebe Road is a mixed-use apartment building comprised of 491 residential units, street level retail, and three levels of below-grade parking. The 2.79-acre, full block site is located at the intersection of North Glebe Road and Wilson Boulevard, in Arlington County's Rosslyn-Ballston Corridor. Clark Foundations was contracted to install the sheeting and shoring (which encompassed an entire city block), inclinometers, and the dewatering system. The shoring consisted of 197 soldier beams drilled through a 20-foot layer of fist and hard hat size cobbles, 377 tiebacks, and 55,000 square feet of hardwood lagging. After six months of excavation the sheeting and shoring hit rock bottom at 45-feet below existing grade.

Utilities

Danilo Diaz, Octavio Hernandez, Transito Nolasco, Victor Rodrigues, Jose Saravia, Martin Villatoro - Anchor Construction Corporation

Project Name: UPI-Crescent Trail, Washington, DC
General Contractor: Anchor Construction Corporation
Work began in 2015 with a 48" lining project and rehab of 7 manholes. During the lining process it was discovered there were various holes in the C&O canal leaking into the storm drain system/sewer system. These holes were rehabbed and Anchor's subcontractor AM Liner successful lined 48" pipe for a distance of 2100 LF. During this process Anchor Construction Corporation rehabbed an old pumping station and designed and formed sluice gates for the old pumping station and Manhole 1 which is the beginning of the project's 2100 ft. 7 Manholes were rehabbed and lowered to meet parks expectations of being 3 feet high from various ranges of shapes and sizes.

Special Construction

Acoustic Systems

Entry Code: J-01

Project Name: The Terrace Theater, Washington, DC
Craft Employer: Staging Concepts
Architect: Quinn Evans Architects
General Contractor: rand* construction corporation
Nominator: rand* construction corporation

Athletic Field & Parks

Anita Butani, Donald Bullock, James Christian, Warren Gover, Olivia Herrera, Justin Miller - HRGM Corporation

Project Name: Garrison Elementary School Field and Playgrounds, Washington, DC
Architect: Bell Architects/Newman JV
Engineer: Wiles Mensch - DC
General Contractor: GCS|SIGAL
Construction of the playgrounds and fields at Garrison Elementary School showcased HRGM’s technical excellence and our outstanding craftsmanship, as well as our ability to execute an extremely complicated project under challenging conditions. Our crews exported and imported over 43,000 tons of material from a highly constrained site with the most complex subgrade conditions ever encountered in our company’s history. We executed our scope under a literal microscope – every ton of soil that we excavated was inspected, tracked, and certified by both onsite soil technicians and onsite archeologists. Every ton of stone that we placed was inspected and certified by a geotechnical engineer.

Geothermal Wells

Justin Dickinson, Chris Hiser, Dave Lawton, Adam Santry, Brett Sweeney - Allied Well Drilling

Project Name: Wheaton Public Improvements, Wheaton, MD
Architect: Gensler
Engineer: Geo-Xergy
General Contractor: Clark Construction Group, LLC
Allied Well Drilling did an exceptional job navigating the complexity of the project. From day one, the project team was pioneering a plan to install a geothermal well field with a 14-story structure built over-top of it. The field was constrained to the size of the building. Typical well installation requires 30 feet spacing to minimize the risk of damaging adjacent wells during the drill process. The spacing for this project was just 13 to 15 feet between wells and Allied Well Drilling strategically developed a sequence to minimize the risk of damaging an adjacent well. After installing nearly 50 miles of geothermal piping, all 15 circuits converged into just one 12'x25' room called the Manifold room. All the piping was routed and turned up through the slab, properly aligned and evenly spaced.

Rainscreen

Terry Downs, Brian Griffin, Diego Guzman, Samuel Vidrio, Benjamin Weiss, Steve Weiss - PCC Construction Components

Project Name: Wharf Pier 4, Washington, DC
Architect: McGraw Bagnoli Architects PLLC
General Contractor: The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
As a result of original work deviations from the architectural, all ACM panels around the slabs had to be field measured and cut to fit in the field. To account for the tight tolerances and open joints of the wood grained panels, PCC performed a laser scan of the project to make a 3D rendering of the as built conditions. This was ultimately used to fabricate the majority of the installed wood panels. The substrate at the entrance and several of the soffit corners were not fully ready at the time of the scan however, and resulted in these areas being field fabricated. Due to the complex geometry of these areas and long lead time of the material shipped from Europe, templates were created to dry fit each panel prior to using the final material.

Scaffolding & Rigging

Joseph Curry, Christopher Greeley, Levy Rivera, Aldiel Segovia - BrandSafway Services, LLC

Project Name: Cannon House Office Building - Phase 1 Renewal, Washington, DC
Architect: Shalom Baranes Associates
Engineer: Thornton Tomasetti
General Contractor: Clark Construction Group, LLC
The Cannon House Office Building was completed in 1908 and is the oldest of the four office buildings in which members of the House of Representatives work. Phase 1 of the project was a full renovation of one of the building's four wings, while the other three wings were occupied by Congress and open to the public. Major components of the renewal project included a large scale MEP retrofit, stone restoration, historic preservation, and the demolition and new construction of the 5th floor. Being able to sufficiently protect the historic features of the existing building during demolition of the 5th floor was a major concern. As a result, the concept of the temporary roof enclosure was born.

Thermal and Moisture Protection

Jose Canales, Javier Pacheco, Javier Ramirez, Paul Simon, Jeff Swayne - DJB Contracting Inc.

Project Name: Phillips Collection Renovation, Washington, DC
Architect: Bowie Gridley Architects
Engineer: Simpson Gumpertz & Heger
General Contractor: Consigli Construction Co., Inc.
The Phillips House, which is connected to The Phillips Collection’s more recent additions, desperately needed to modernize its outdated mechanical systems. The existing systems were unable to maintain a museum-quality environment and thus unable to protect the priceless treasures on display. This highly sensitive renovation required frequent communication with the owner, end-users, adjacent embassies and businesses, as well as neighborhood committees. The envelope of the vertical expansion was creatively designed to allow the largest interior space possible to fit all the M/E/P equipment, while conforming to high energy-efficient standards of today’s best practices..

Woods & Plastics

Architectural Millwork

Mike Greeson, Mike Grimes, Billy Harp, Eduardo Peraza, Ever Quijada, Justin Wilson - ISEC, Inc.

Project Name: Columbia Place Hotel, Washington, DC
Architect: Forrest Perkins
General Contractor: Hensel Phelps
This was an AWI premium grade project that includes several million dollars in high end millwork finishes. A majority of this millwork scope was installed over a period of approximately 4 months. A crew of up to 60 ISEC carpenters working overtime was required in order to maintain schedule. The project includes thousands of SF of stain-grade premium walnut-veneered paneling and casework, which occurs throughout the lower premium lobby spaces and guest floors. The paneling throughout the first and second floors includes several intricate stainless steel detail elements that required precision craftsmanship to execute.

Travis Gee, Edward Gregory, Eugene Gregory, Josue Sousa, Daniel Tarqui - Mahogany, Inc.

Project Name: The Terrace Theater, Washington, DC
Architect: Quinn Evans Architects
General Contractor: rand* construction corporation
The Kennedy Center Terrace Theater was a complete demolition and build back of the performance auditorium with a completely custom millwork package that required precise integration with the concrete risers and partition installations. Over 500 custom undulating acoustic wall panels, balcony panels and cross aisle panels were installed throughout auditorium cladding the radial concrete risers and partitions. The auditorium also features custom sliding proscenium walls and moveable proscenium headers to allow for flexibility in stage performances determined by the performance classification. The wood paneling at lobby staircase, auditorium railings, and curved balconies required the use of mock-ups to be installed with temporary materials to ensure the shop built custom panels fit perfectly in the field.

Michael Do, Eduardo Howell, Carlos Jordan, Robert Lucas, Andre' Scott, Samuel Taliaferro - Baker & Kerr

Project Name: Nestle Headquarters, Arlington, VA
Architect: Gensler
Engineer: GHT Ltd.
General Contractor: DAVIS Construction
Baker & Kerr was faced with many technical and challenging features on the Nestle HQ project that they were able to plan for, adapt to and overcome to deliver an exceptional space for the client. The key features we have focused on for the nomination include the Corian wrapped radial stair from the lobby to the Nestle Store, millwork display casework for Nestle memorabilia on floor 34, along with the Executive Pantry and Kitchen casework and display walls at floor 35.

Si Nguyen, Tai Pham, Tony Quaranto, Therin Riddle, Samantha Turley, Randy Tusing - Jefferson Millworkd & Design, Inc.

Project Name: Capital One Block B, McLean, VA
Architect: CallisonRTKL
General Contractor: DAVIS Construction
Jefferson Millwork and Design has touched several main amenity floors within this new 31-story building with premium custom grade millwork. The scope was diverse and the execution was challenging. Most notable is the 2,500-SF of quartered walnut stairs wrapping a steel and concrete skeleton structure. The monumental stair is installed from the sixth to seventh floor and incorporates lighting, access panels and a white lacquer surround at the floor intersection. The stair was one of the most challenging aspects of this project. Multiple mock-ups, templates and ultimately over 600 hours of install went into this double rise stair case with a centered seating area. The walnut was hand selected for character and continuity as well as the capability to form a curved riser deck.

Tony Maldonado, Gerry Schumacher - Washington Woodworking

Project Name: 2345 Crystal Drive Lobby Renovation, Arlington, VA
Architect: HKS, PC
Engineer: SK&A Structural Engineers, PLLC
General Contractor: Harvey-Cleary Builders
Installed 10,000 sf of wood plank and flooring on every inch of the main lobby. What made this work difficult was installing it while the building was occupied. Additionally, we installed 10,000 sf in only three weeks. Details and precision were major factors in installing wood plank surrounding elevators, lights, millwork, a fireplace and a green wall.