2022 Craftsmanship Awards Winners


A next to the project name indicates that the project was nominated for the special Star Award.


Cast-in-Place Concretef

Juan Flores, Noe Guzman, Michael Lipps, Ever Martinez, Jeff Wolf - Baker Construction DC LLC

Project Name: Museum Place,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Beyer Blinder Belle
Engineer:  TCE & Associates, Inc.
General Contractor:  Balfour Beatty
The project began with a 48” thick mat slab in wet unsuitable soils. With early design-assist input, they deployed internal expertise and modeling to review reinforcement in advance of the third-party inspections, developed placement plans to manage high volume placements, and submitted finishing plans to coordinate future finish applications. Baker meticulously installed an under-slab drainage network, beyond typical concrete scope. Whether it was internal review of steel reinforcement or their in-house field engineering team spot checking elevations and embeds, Baker kept ahead of placements to ensure that concrete remained on schedule and was completed one month early.



Exterior Glass

Andrew Buter, Jacob Faircloth, Steve Parkinson, Michael Pray, Albert Valentine - Vetro Building Envelope

Project Name: 2100 Penn,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Pelli Clarke Pelli/WDG Architecture
General Contractor:  Balfour Beatty
The design was initially implemented in a three-story mockup at a third-party testing agency’s facility to review the curtain wall system from an aesthetics standpoint and test system performance to ensure compliance with job specifications. Constant, in-depth coordination took place during curtain wall installation – ranging from sequence and logistics to intricate details, such as how exterior light fixture pathway penetrates the system, to ensuring the 11-story atrium structural steel supporting curtain wall was properly coordinated, to designing the mechanical supply of air through the system to service the atrium – all while maintaining architectural alignment to meet the design intent and not compromising the integrity of the system.

Flint Duffey, James Hale, Inmer Majano, Mark Stalnaker, Tony Useda, Albert Zanella - Tidewater Glazing, Inc.

Project Name: Tysons Central Building A,  Vienna, VA
Architect:  Gensler
Engineer:  SK&A Structural Engineers, PLLC
General Contractor:Clark/Foulger Pratt JV
Tidewater Glazing overcame the major project hurdle of keeping production and deliveries for almost a thousand window units aligned with the needs of the structure and precast schedule. They were able to complete this work just after the reshoring of the structure and stay ahead of the precast installation. Tidewater used the tower crane during the day to pour the concrete structure. The company kept deliveries timed precisely to preload the entire building with all the windows without interrupting the construction of the structure or the installation of the precast.

Interior Glass

Federico Ferro, Eduardo Godoy, Andrew Keely, Kevin Mulla, Brian Sparrow, Alex Sturaro - Modernus

Project Name: Walker & Dunlop,  Bethesda, MD
Architect:  Gensler
General Contractor:  rand* construction corporation
he interior glass scope required extensive coordination with other trades to ensure the level of quality inherent in the design intent. The Modernus family of coordinated wall systems created a gorgeously seamless, coplanar aesthetic. Modernus’ incredible walls expertise, combined with their intelligent engineering offered the Walker and Dunlop design team the ability to incorporate this elegantly minimalist LAMA system integrated three aluminum frame finish options with matching door hardware, low-profile inset clerestories between offices and corridors, creating bright and open interior spaces, and switch glass double-glazed walls for flexible privacy fully integrated into the electrical and AV Lutron interface.



Lighting Systems

Louis Burgher, Clint Cantrell, Mounir Dourrachad, Minassie Ghirmay, Jeff Laroche, David Lawson - Mona Electric Group, Inc

Project Name: Capital One Block C Performing Arts Center,  Tysons, Va
Architect:  HGA
Engineer:  Mueller Associates
General Contractor:  The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
The architectural interior and exterior lights and control systems are state of the art, aesthetically pleasing and have advanced design with many control inputs and scene selection capabilities. There are separate control systems for the building interior, exterior and green roof areas. Many of the light fixtures have been selected from custom manufacturers around the world. The performance lights and control systems in the main theater are complex and create the right atmosphere for live performances. There are additional performance systems in the black box theater section of the building. The areas have separate dimming equipment rooms as well as individual control rooms.

James Desmond, Timothy Harrigan, Arther Slate III, Gregory Smith, Christopher West, Michael Williams - JE Richards

Project Name: BET MGM,  Oxon Hill, MD
Architect:  Hamilton Anderson Associates
Engineer:  Giovanetti Shulman Associates
General Contractor:  HITT Contracting
This project’s lighting package included 600’ of linear LED strip lighting and 360 various light fixture types. The 2 custom chandeliers that are hung at the main bar area were imported from the Czech Republic and took coordination between JE Richards and the manufacturer. JE Richards worked closely with multiple specialized low voltage vendors for the installation of the 110-foot wrap-around LED screen as well as the 360-degree jumbotron that is over the main bar. The project required a new electrical room to be built which houses 6 new electrical panels and 1 transformer hung just under 20 feet.

Fervi Alvarez-Portillo, Christopher Borzi, Eric Cullens, Pedro Larin, Michael Myers, Hamidulla Naim - JE Richards

Project Name: Tysons Galleria North Anchor Redevelopment,  McLean, VA
Architect:  TVS Design
Engineer:  Salas O'Brien
General Contractor:  The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
ysons Galleria North Anchor Redevelopment is a retail project that was designed to repurpose a traditional Retail Anchor of the Existing Tysons Galleria Mall. The old Macys Anchor is now split up into several different tenant spaces. We brought 4 new 3,000-amp services into the building and split up the service for each tenant as they arrived. This was the challenging part, as we had to keep the mall operational all while modifying the new gear - each tenant required new demands to suit their lease requirements. The Common Mall Area had 67 different light types and over 2,000 lights in the building. The most difficult fixture would most definitely be the chandelier at the Mall’s New Entrance, as it is mounted onto a 57’ ceiling.

Rachid Abdessamad, Andres Aguirre, L'Houssaine Amar, Jared Crossley, Rick Curl Jr., Miguel De La Luz Rodriguez - Dynalectric Company

Project Name: Confidential Financial Services,  Washington, DC
Architect:  STUDIOS Architecture
Engineer:  GHT Limited
General Contractor:  Gilbane Building Company
The space incorporates high-end lighting and finishes. Gilbane Building Company was awarded this project and brought in Dynalectric Company to perform the electrical work. The light fixture package on this project was extremely high-end which included over 1,130 fixtures of 90 different types. LED down lights, pendants and recessed slot lights illuminate and showcase the space. Some of our major hurdles were working in an occupied building and completing the project in less than 9 months. In addition, two lighting control systems were installed to enhance the project’s finishes and showcase settings.

Andre Anderson, Melvin Cherry, Stephon Lake, Katha Nanthana, Johnny Pickett Sr., Jarrett Randall - Rosendin

Project Name: Reston Gateway,  Reston, VA
Architect:  Michael Graves Architecture & Design
Engineer:  Vanderweil
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
The 731,000 SF project consists of the tenant build-out for the new Reston Gateway development. The project consists of 19 floors of the 28-story structure, new 2.5M generators, and complicated systems including lighting controls, audio visual, and telecommunications. Rosendin’s scope of work included electrical, lighting control, and fire alarm complete installs, telecommunication, and security pathways. Additionally, Rosendin participated in preconstruction services which included providing budgets during early design development phase, lighting control costs and performance review, schedule, and prefabrication planning.

Derrick Coleman, Brian Follmeyer, Tommy Nguyen, Jimmy Phan, Jason Simpson, Eric Stevenson - Freestate Electrical Construction Co.

Project Name: Hangar 21,  Camp Springs, MD
Architect/Engineer:  FSB/POND
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
The state-of-the-art lighting system Includes a programmable lighting controls system as well as an area control system for perimeter lighting, aircraft apron lighting and hangar bay lighting. All lighting is LED and the administration, auditorium, hangar bays and ECF are controlled throughout a Crestron control system that is tied into the building EMCS system. The hangar bay lights are twin 4’ high bay LED troffers mounted at + 85’ AFF and were all installed from 120’ boom lift. There are over 400 lights between the hangar bays. There is over 50,000’ of branch conduit in the hangar bays alone to serve the lighting. The apron lights are 80’ tall with a 16’ deep and 8’ diameter base that were cast in place.

Power Generation, Distribution and Switchgear

Jim Anderson, Jon Bayeaux, Devaughn DeSilva, Christopher Fanning, Steve Franek, John Martin - Freestate Electrical Construction Co.

Project Name: Hangar 21,  Camp Springs, MD
Architect/Engineer:  FSB/POND
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
The distribution system utilizes 15kv distribution thru five 15kv pad mounted air switches to serve the five 2500 Kva, one 750 Kva, one 300 Kva, two 150 Kva, and one 75Kva transformers to serve the five buildings including the hangar, ECF, FPH, HAZMAT and fuel building and the covered storage building. There is over 89,500’ (16.5 miles) of 15kv EPR cable pulled through 46 manholes, over 300,000’ (56 miles) of feeder cable and over 90,000’ (17 miles) of feeder conduit hung under the slab from trapeze hangars. There are also three 2250 KW generators paralleled to support the admin/hangar building as well as a 1500kw Gen for the fire pump house, 300kva for the ECF, 750kva for the fuel building and a 150 Kva for the lift station.
Star Award Nominee

Jeff Baggarly, Sam Bumgardner, Ronnie King, Mark Miller, Kyle Pullen, Andrew Talcott - Dynalectric Company

Project Name: Loudoun Center,  Ashburn, VA
Architect:  DVA Architects
Engineer:  Morrison Hershfield
General Contractor:  Holder Construction
With a footprint over 250,000 SF and 540,000 SF of interior space on three levels, LC1-Bldg B at Loudoun Center is one of the largest data centers built to date in this area. This building was designed to provide 74 MW of power for a single user tenant. Dominion Power has provided 5 dedicated 35KV power circuits to this building which required Dynalectric to build over 9,000 feet of concrete encased 8-way duct bank for their power circuits coming from two different substations. A large Telecom and MV underground package led to a total of 519000’ of large conduit sizes 4” and up only (just over 98 miles) and an additional 377,000’ of small conduit in the slab.

Will Casagrande, Jeovanny Diaz, Corey Handler, Ralfin Pineda, Joel Salmeron, Michael Timberlake - Power Solutions, LLC

Project Name: QTS Acadia PH3A,  Manassas, VA
Architect:  Corgan
Engineer:  KW Mission Critical Engineering
General Contractor:  DPR Construction
This project was constructed in the shell space of a live colocation data center and the installed equipment and systems had to be seamlessly integrated into operational systems serving live critical loads in the existing data center. The scope included rigging and setting the equipment through openings prepared in the generator room wall. Challenges to the on-time delivery of the generator plant included a) delays in structural elements required for the complete electrical installation; b) mandatory “off-shift” installation of feeders in the existing Medium Voltage switchboards; c) logistical complications of working above the equipment; and d) delays with the supply of the owner furnished equipment.

Jeovanny Diaz, Corey Handler, Ralfin Pineda, Michael Timberlake - Power Solutions, LLC

Project Name: Iron Mountain VA2B3,  Manassas, VA
Architect:  Corgan
Engineer:  Environmental System Design Inc.
General Contractor:  Clune Construction
Very high-quality expectations were met through pre-planning and detailed inter-trade coordination well before the commencement of installation activities. Among the equipment installed were three 2.5 Megawatt generators, three medium voltage distribution power plants, three 1.5 megawatt UPS rooms, and 18 PDU units. Challenges to the on-time delivery of the UPS rooms and generator plants included a) delays in delivery of switchgear and generators reducing the time required for the complete electrical installation; and b) strict COVID restrictions that required two separate install teams with restrictions on manpower working on both live side activities and construction.

Andrew Bean, Andrew Clerico, Dwight Daniels, Bob Esteppe, Tim McDaniel, Robert Spittle - Singleton Electric Company, Inc.

Project Name: Piscataway Water Resource Recovery Facility Electrical Upgrades,  Accokeek, MD
Engineer:  Greeley and Hansen
General Contractor:  Ulliman Schutte Construction, LLC
Piscataway Water Resource Recovery Facility Electrical Upgrades Project updated the electrical distribution equipment on the entire plant. The main distribution equipment (Main Switchgear S-1) consisted of one 1200A 12.47 kV switchgear with two 2000 kVA 12.47 to 2.4 kV transformers and (2) 1500 kVA 12.47 to 2.4 kV transformers. Main Switchgear S-1 in turn fed OSS1 & OSS2 switchgear, each consisting of one 1200A 2.4 kV switchgear. OSS1 & OSS2 serve USS2C, USS1C, USS2B and USS2D which are each 480V outdoor switchgear that serve buildings and equipment on site. Singleton had to use many existing duct banks which caused us to make a detailed outage plan where old wire had to be removed before new wire could be pulled all while keeping two feeds to all equipment.

Santos Diaz, John Lee, Marvin Ramos-Rodriguez, Denis Rodriguez, Emerson Rodriguez, Nick Schafer - Singleton Electric Company, Inc.

Project Name: Noman M. Cole PCP – MCC and DC Replacement,  Lorton, VA
Architect/Engineer:  Jacobs
General Contractor:  Clark Water
The scope consisted of the replacement or modification of 40 MCCs and 18 DCs and associated appurtenances. The work was performed in 20 process and support buildings throughout the plant. In addition to replacing the motor control and distribution centers, the power, instrumentation, and controls were upgraded to nearly 80% of the plant’s process system. To maintain the plant’s production, the existing power distribution equipment and SCADA network remained in operation during the construction and build out of new electrical rooms and buildings. The replacement MCCs, DCs and PLC/RIO panels were set, terminated, and tested prior to transferring the existing loads to the new system.

Mike Douglas, Jim Downing, Steve Lewis, Lance Prout, Tom Shannon, Ted Sparshott - Singleton Electric Company, Inc.

Project Name: Martin Building Major Renovation Project,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Shalom Baranes Associates
Engineer:  Vanderweil
General Contractor:  Hensel Phelps
In the first few months of the project, Singleton had to relocate the existing 15 kV paralleling gear that was in the way of new structural demolition for the elevators. Singleton had no as-built control drawings of the existing gear. During the relocation, Singleton had to maintain at least one generator in service. The new power distribution system consisted of three new 15 kV switchgear, three 2500 kVA network transformers, one 5000A 480V switchgear, one 750 kW generators, over 100 new panelboards, as well as 5000A, 2000A, 800A bus duct. The new equipment had been extensively tested and commissioned prior to being put into service and demolishing the old paralleling gear.

Special Systems

Erich Hoffman, Daniel Lambert, Joshua Lambert, Eric Newman, Octavius Smith, Angelique Willis-Hilbrich - Freestate Electrical Construction Co.

Project Name: Hangar 21,  Camp Springs, MD
Architect/Engineer:  FSB/POND
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
There is over 100,000’ of fire alarm wire and over 2000 devices and terminal cabinets to serve the buildings which all tie back to a central radio transmission station. The system also monitors the AFFF system that serves the hangar bays. The exceptional planning and execution enabled us to install the majority of the conduit raceways in the slab which helps with the aesthetics and proves the high level of craftsmanship. The work in the fuel building is primarily Class 1 Division 1 and the hangar bay and Hazmat building are both mixes of Class 1 Division 1 and Division 2 areas requiring the installation of explosion proof raceways (threaded rigid conduit) and equipment.

Eric Hitch, Mike Kern, Ha Le, Javon Posey, Chris Schiro, Joe Steinhice - Singleton Electric Company, Inc.

Project Name: Noman M. Cole PCP – MCC and DC Replacement,  Lorton, VA
Architect/Engineer:  Jacobs
General Contractor:  Clark Water
Including Singleton’s scope of work for the Noman M. Cole Pollution Control Plant was the replacement, modification and expansion of the process SCADA PLCs and standby power control systems. The SCADA and standby power control system infrastructure includes the addition of a redundant SCADA server, 19 ethernet switches, 14 fiber patch panels and 28 control and RIO panels. Singleton pulled 26,800’ of fiber and made 4,500 terminations, pulled 2,950,000’ of control wire and made over 25,000 terminations.
Star Award Winner for Technical Excellence

Mike Dove, Robert Huff, Amin Odemns, Neil Quimby, Mike Roberts, Andrew Russo - VarcoMac, LLC

Project Name: INOVA Fairfax - Fire Alarm Testing And Maintenance,  Vienna, VA
General Contractor:  VarcoMac, LLC
Annual fire alarm system testing, maintenance and service for INOVA Fairfax Medical Campus. Requires coordination with multiple systems, staff, and patient care in an occupied health care facility with ongoing construction activities and schedules to test all fire alarm devices campus wide. Includes documentation and reporting for Joint Commission Inspection. Service has reduced quantity of fire alarm system failures and overall repair costs year to year.



Ceramic Tile and Terrazo

Johny Lopez, Jose Lopez, Franklin Mendes, Joel Mendes, Marvin Mendez - Aris Tile & Flooring, LLC

Project Name: Capital One Block C - Tower 1,  Tysons, VA
Architect:  Gensler
General Contractor:  The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
The craftsman of Aris Tile deserve recognition for the exceptional services rendered on The Watermark project. The Watermark Hotel is located in Capital One Center, featuring 300 luxury residential suites, including lavish, upscale finishes throughout the guest rooms and amenity spaces. The building contains over 25 different tile types and there are 47 unique room types, making this anything but a ‘cookie cutter’ installation. The Aris craftsmen showcased their skills in the large amenity spaces including a full-service restaurant and bar.

Elmer Foronda, Marc Ginsberg, Moncia Yanapatzi - East Coast Tile Contractors

Project Name: American Physical Therapy Association,  Alexandria, VA
Architect:  Gensler
General Contractor:  DAVIS Construction
The APTA main lobby floor required more technical knowledge from the craftsmen than a typical floor install. The terrazzo and ceramic tile have long, straight cuts that required their full attention. The cuts were made with precision as there was little tolerance for error in the design. The joints are consistent, and the tiles line up precisely as designed. The color and quality of the material used make the architect’s vision for this space come alive. East Coast Tile completed the work ahead of schedule exceeding expectations throughout the project.

Carlos Amaya, Francisco Pineda Calix, Edgar Carreto-Ramos, Hector Lopez Perez, Jacinto Torres, Jose Varella - Boatman and Magnani

Project Name: National Air and Space Museum Revitalization,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Quinn Evans Architects
General Contractor:  Clark/Smoot/Consigli Joint Venture
The terrazzo design was completely redesigned after construction began. As part of this process, Boatman and Magnani completed a 40’x40’ terrazzo mockup to allow the owner and architect to see the design on a large scale. The collaborative design process also involved assessing the existing, uneven concrete floor before installation. After determining that the best path forward was to create a flat (not necessarily level) floor, Boatman helped to develop a “floor sloping plan” to minimize additional fill costs and floor grinding, which also minimized noticeability of the sloping. The floor inlay designs required high attention to detail, including 12 medallions, the Compass Rose, and Pulsar Map, which were hand measured and laid out by the B&M team in the field.
Star Award Winner for Excellence in the Face of Adversity

Drywall

Emerson Claure, Gino Contreras, Ricardo Constanza, David Orozco, Orlando Ortuno, Ricardo Sandoval - Anning-Johnson Company

Project Name: Confidential Law Firm,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Perkins & Will
General Contractor:  D|Watts Construction
The quality of the door package install drywall, wood and drywall ceilings are exceptional. The L Street side of the floor plate has high levels of sunlight exposure and the level of finish and quality really shined through on this one with a minimal punch list that was quickly completed within 2 weeks of issuance on each floor. AJ was also responsible for delivering the 9 wood ceilings on the executive floors 10 and 11 where hold to dimensions were established upfront for ordering materials and final carpentry skills were required to final cut, modify and install to meet the strict design tolerances on spacing and alignment.

Jose Ortiz, Victor Ruiz, Ed Wright - Capitol Drywall, Inc.

Project Name: Capital One Block C Performing Arts Center,  Tysons, VA
Architect:  HGA
General Contractor:  The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
The ceiling follows the saw tooth design incorporated into the exterior of the facility. The main lobby ceiling is 70’ high with sloped sections that carries over the grand stair and into the High Gallery area of the project. We are nominating this element based on the complexity of the ceiling, the level 5 finish, the coordination required with other trades, the difficulty in access and the stunning final product. The finish on the sloped sections was an unforgiving plaster product which required the back-up materials to be installed flawlessly.

Roberto G. Castillo, David Muise, Wilder Vasquez Orellana, Kerry Rosfeld, Francisco Velaquez, Salvador Vitela - Capitol Drywall, Inc.

Project Name: Neustar,  Reston, VA
Architect:  HKS
Engineer:  KTA
General Contractor:  rand* construction corporation
he ceilings house a number of custom materials, including three types of Trisoft panels that had to be heavily coordinated with the stair installation and MEP infrastructure as well as a Vapor Pixel Backlit Metal Ceiling integrated into the Woodworks ceiling application spanning the elevator lobbies into the entry spaces on all three floors. There is more specialty ceiling installed on this project than not, including installation above a 30’ x 30’ stair cut. The original schedule of 4 weeks of install per floor was compressed to 4 weeks for all floors due to delays during the pandemic. Smaller crews with double shifts were performed to meet the install requirements while maintaining safety. Coordination was critical as 4 ceiling systems transition into one another.

Flooring

Behzad Jodeiri, Erick Mariona, Marcos Mariona, Pablo Mariona, Willian Mariona, Masoud Zargarsaleh - Floors Etc.

Project Name: The Wilson & The Elm,  Bethesda, MD
Architect:  Shalom Baranes Associates
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
The most challenging aspect of the project was the end grain wood in the fitness center and the amenity bridge, which was positioned within a 1/16-inch tolerance to create a patterned look. The flooring required detailed layout, fitting and adjustments in order ensure levelness across the fitness and amenity bridge areas. In the fitness center, the flooring was installed on top of the concrete structure, further complicating the leveling process. The amenity bridge has numerous curves and elevations and ties into multiple egress points, requiring extreme attention to detail.

Geovanni Hernandez, Jose Leiba, Leonel Lemus, Roberto Torres Medrano, Jose Roberto Torres - Mid Atlantic Floors

Project Name: Fox Rothschild DC Office,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Francis Cauffman Architects
General Contractor:  rand* construction corporation
The space is showcased by the American walnut wood flooring in both linear and French herringbone pattern. The architect used the differing patterns to mimic a floor carpet shape to create space within the open room. They also used the herringbone pattern to direct the path of travel and accentuate the lobby and hallways in the suite. This wood, although of American origin, was sourced from an Italian manufacturer. This posed challenges to our schedule as the materials were required on site at the height of the pandemic. Due to extensive lead times, the demountable installation had to happen prior to the wood floors which required the wood flooring to be installed tight to the tracks in lieu of under the tracks throughout the whole space.

Painting and Wallcovering

Katey Corda, Maria Hardman, Geoffrey Hemans, Nathan Silver, Justin Stamper, Mirta Vital Peralta - EverGreene Architectural Arts

Project Name: National Air and Space Museum Artifact Move Coordination,  Washington, DC
General Contractor:  Clark/Smoot/Consigli/Joint Venture
EverGreene was contracted to remove a canvas mural 10-feet high by 75-feet long from the museum ahead of building renovations. The vibrant mural, Weather by Eric Sloane, depicts clouds and weather patterns. It had been hidden and nearly forgotten behind a false wall for decades. Plans called for removal, asbestos remediation, archival storage, and later reinstallation. The support wall was finished with materials containing asbestos, requiring mural removal work and ACM remediation to take place inside negative-air containment. Removal occurred during summer in an active construction zone. Working conditions were hot and humid, and required appropriate PPE including Tyvek suits, facial respirators, gloves, and safety glasses and boots, while applying museum-quality conservation care. Murals were removed using icing spatulas. The EverGreene team removed all ACM from the back while lying suspended above the mural on a rolling platform.

Carlos Almendras, John Carballo, Jhury Garcia, Marcelo Garcia, Edin Wilber Rodriguez Arguta - Sparkle Painting Co., Inc.

Project Name: Capital One Block C - Tower 1,  Tysons, VA
Architect:  Gensler
General Contractor:  The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
The building contained over 17 different wall covering types including wood veneer and custom art wall covering installed throughout the 47 different room types and amenity spaces. The guest rooms had two different textured wall coverings along with a custom art wall covering with patterns that had to all align which made installation difficult to execute but produced a very high quality of work that is typically hard to provide given the varying changes throughout the 300 guest rooms. Outside of the guest rooms, the elevator lobbies all had a wood veneer wall covering that took a technical approach in assuring that the grains lined up to provide the proper aesthetic that the architect was going for.

Larry Duvall, Joao Valente - Delta Painting and Wallcovering

Project Name: Fox Rothschild DC Office,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Francis Cauffman Architects
General Contractor:  rand* construction corporation
The space utilizes a number of wall finishes to visually separate spaces and generate unique atmospheres. Two specs of the wall coverings are found in the conference rooms utilizing 3D felt tiles that were adhered to the wall. Each wall spec helps create defined spaces within the open office as well as uniquely distinguishing each type of conference room. The installation of these wall covering types required immense precision as they aligned perfectly with the other elements within the room. The 3D nature of the wall covering also meant higher level of coordination between trades that devices within these walls. Electrical outlets had to be precisely cut out while maintaining patterns, all devices had to be carefully aligned.

Plaster

Nelson Berrios, Cirilo Tapia Fuentes, Pablo Condori Perlas, Maximiliano Soto, Anna Torre-Smith, Elmer Ferrufino Zurita - ATS Studios

Project Name: Capital One Block C Performing Arts Center,  Tysons, VA
General Contractor:  The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
ATS Studios (now doing business as PWC Companies) installed over 27,000 SF of Star Silent Acoustic plaster in a sawtooth pattern on the 4-story atrium ceilings of Capitol One Block C. These ceiling had to be framed independently of the Green Roof just above that needs a 4” tolerance of movement at any given time due to heavy snow or rain loads. We also designed a custom metallic blue venetian plaster which was featured in all the elevator lobbies, the lower valet lobby, and throughout Black Box and Black Box waiting area. The intent of the finish was to duplicate the metallic blue finish on the signature Capitol One Credit Card.



Exterior Stone

Shawn Fagan, Victor Hernandez, Zenon Moya, Boanerges Quintanilla, Sacramento Vergara, Wilver Zavala - Rugo Stone, LLC

Project Name: National Air and Space Museum Revitalization,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Quinn Evans Architects
Engineer:  Robert Silman Associates
General Contractor:  Clark/Smoot/Consigli Joint Venture
As part of the National Air and Space Museum revitalization, Rugo Stone designed and installed the new granite veneer on the facade, beginning with the demolition of the original stone support system and removal of the existing Tennessee marble. Rugo participated in a vigorous design assist process to ensure that the proposed aluminum-insulated wall system exceeded blast requirements, as well as insulated system and air vapor barrier specifications. The thermally broken aluminum mullions were spliced together during install and attached back to the building structure with ½” thick stainless-steel Z-clips. After mullions were complete, the insulated panels with customized intermedial horizontal rails were installed and sealed.
Star Award Nominee

Victor Castro, Yobany Diaz Machuca, Ana Meneses, Jose Abraham Ventura Romero, Yaneth Flores Valencia, Jose Velasquez - Lorton Stone, LLC

Project Name: US Supreme Court Balustrade Restoration,  Washington, DC
Architect/Engineer:  Architect of the Capitol
General Contractor:  Lorton Stone, LLC
Restoring the exterior balustrade of the US Supreme Court. Carved Dutchman, mortar patches, crack repairs and general cleaning 100%, copper stain removal. Laser cleaning and consolidation of historic craved elements. Restored 4 bronze lampposts and 2 bronze flagpole bases. This project’s level of craftsmanship and aesthetic beauty is excellent. Extremely labor intensive and all material is historical marble and bronze. Working with the Architect of the Capitol is a privilege but comes with the expectation of perfect work.

Daniel Leiva, Jose Lemus, Roberto Ramia, Jairo Sandoval, Roberto Zavala, Santos Zelaya - Janeiro, Inc.

Project Name: Avocet Tower,  Bethesda, MD
Architect:  Cooper Carry
General Contractor:  Balfour Beatty
The main two-story lobby of the Avocet Tower has four distinct stone types, two on the floor and two on the walls. A feature wall is a jewel quality lapis stone that is double book matched. Byron wall stone, which is the bulk of the wall, was an alternate stone due to initial selected material shortage from the supply chain issues. The 18th floor and 23rd floor lobbies and the bathroom countertops were Byron stone as well. The rooftop terrace has granite stone at the column bases and a granite stone bar with a waterfall edge. The plaza stone at the fountain features a large, stepped boulder look for water to cascade over, and a water wall.

Miguel A. Diaz Fuentes, Victor Lemus, Peter Machado, Wilfredo Orellana, Wilson Orellana - R. Bratti Associates

Project Name: 1001 Pennsylvania Avenue,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Fox Architects
Engineer:  TCE & Associates, Inc.
General Contractor:  rand* construction corporation
The exterior stone scope needed to salvage all historic Indiana limestone for reuse to be modified to accommodate the new structure for canopies and be concealed in piers, new parking garage air intake, and receive a new structural curtain wall. The principal difficulty was transitioning from a previously outdoor space to a now enclosed area requiring rework to all structural elements starting from supporting the slab on P1 to the 2nd-floor deck and be able to reinstall existing stone with minimal modifications as approved by CFA. Additional coordination required for waterproofing elements previously non existing now being tied into the piers and into the now interior section of floor stone as well as moving out the building - exterior granite stairs and ramps, and further into the existing pavers - which required rework to account for minimal sloping per ADA code.

Juan Aguilar, Jose Guerra, Jesus Jaramillo, Karina Mendoza, Ever Rodriquez - Atlantic Refinishing and Restoration

Project Name: Jefferson Memorial Roof & Portico Restoration,  Washington, DC
Architect:  GWWO, Inc.
General Contractor:  Grunley Construction Company
Atlantic Refinishing and Restoration’s work on the Jefferson Memorial Roof & Portico Restoration project included intricate masonry repairs to the historic marble façade of the building, including raking and repointing all mortar joints from the bottom of column capitals to the top of the dome; repairing cracks; installing replacement limestone pieces at the portico ceiling; and carving and installing new dutchmen. To restore the monument’s dome, Atlantic performed the intricate work of removing each marble roof tile from the portico roof to facilitate cleaning, and then resetting the tiles in their original place all while ensuring the slope of the roof was maintained. At ground level, Atlantic performed crack repairs, raking and repointing joints, dutchman installation, and lead joint cover installation at the stylobate steps and upper terrace wall.
Star Award Nominee

Interior Stone & Marble

Peter Machado, Jose Amadeo Marquez, Daniel E. Mazariego, Wilson Orellana, Santos Andres Paz, Santos Rene Guevara Zelaya - R. Bratti Associates

Project Name: Capital One Block C Performing Arts Center,  Tysons, VA
Architect:  HGA
General Contractor:  The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
The Main Entry Granite Stone Flooring and Italian White Marble entry stair is your 1st impression of the Capital One Performing Arts Center. The rough-cut granite flooring starts at the exterior main entrance, carries through to the white marble stair and continues on the 2nd level in great expanse as the flooring for the Grand Lobby with the marble stair walls extending over the escalator and carrying trough to the main lobby bar. Truly extraordinary architecture that needs to be seen to be appreciated. Bratti’s attention to detail in the installation is exquisite and wows you as you enter the facility and carries through to the entrance of the theater.

Unit Masonry

Elmer Dominguez, Juan Lara, Andrew Taylor, Doug Whetzel - Calvert Masonry

Project Name: City Ridge,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Shalom Baranes Associates
General Contractor:  The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
The brick work included infilling large sections of the historic Fannie Mae Building (Building A) with salvaged brick, providing a custom blend of unique handmade bricks for adjacent areas and installing and custom staining new water-table bricks to work with the historic fabric of the existing building. In addition, Calvert installed 81,200 Rockdale bricks around building D - These are the Red handmade bricks with white faces. This required excellent craftsmanship as this brick could NOT be washed down as to preserve the overall look. They also installed four other styles of bricks including over 22,000 artisan bricks and 8,000 smooth bricks at the Wegmans store.



HVAC-Piping

Johnny Golden, Joe Piechocki, Corey Pryor, Dave Shankle, Brian Streng, John Yeakle - Mallick Mechanical Contractors

Project Name: American University Central Plant,  Washington, DC
Architect:  MKSD Architects, LLC
Engineer:  HB Engineers, Inc.
General Contractor:  The Fulcrum Group
With the desire to enhance its energy efficiency and sustainability, American University converted to a low temperature hot water system. Mallick Mechanical was contracted as the main general contractor for one of American University’s largest and most complicated projects in decades. The D.C. University’s existing central plant -- acting as the heartbeat to the 84-acre campus -- consisted of three large steam boilers, which were ultimately removed and replaced with 9 condensing boilers that supplied heat for the campus and domestic hot water through heat exchangers located in individual buildings. Mallick Mechanical also added 12 hydronic pumps, 2 absorption chillers, 1 plate heat exchanger and 1 MW of cogeneration.



Metal Panels

Bernardino Espinoza, Erik Romo, Leopoldo Saenz Romo, Marcos Nelson Bascope Uriona, Mauricio Landa Verde - Capitol Drywall, Inc. and E. Alex Benitez - Direct Electric Services

Project Name: Two Freedom Square Lobby Renovation,  Reston, VA
Architect:  Sasaki
Engineer:  Dewberry
General Contractor:  DAVIS Construction
From an execution point of view, the 5-layers involved in the installation took extreme coordination between both our noted Craftsmen’s employers: Capitol Drywall, Inc. and Direct Electric Services, along with American Automatic Sprinkler Company. The execution started immediately following their notice to proceed when they were tasked with installing a mockup that was used for both the owner and design team’s review of the elements. This mockup allowed the team to work through the roadblocks of installing each element simultaneously with another company. Also, we were able to make some changes to the openings both between the panels and where the pendent lights drop through the panels so that the light bleed could be eliminated. The craftsmen truly understood how to install the ceiling elements from a technical point of view.

Ivan Arellano, Benito Bernal, Jose Fajardo Bueno, Tyrone Gorum, Freddie Stewart, David Van Patton - The Lathan Company

Project Name: The Netherlands Carillon Restoration,  Arlington, VA
Architect:  Quinn Evans Architects
Engineer:  1200 Architectural Engineers PLLC
General Contractor:  Asturian-Consigli JV, LLC
The Carillon consists of 1,702 steel cladding panels along with rails, steps, and other steel elements. Each piece was photographed, measured, labeled, and cataloged before removal. They were then shipped to Lathan’s Alabama facility to be refurbished with exacting precision. This consisted of removing 50 years of layered paint, spraying a zinc coating, two zinc primer coats and a high performance Tnemec 1072 Topcoat. Once the panels and components were removed, the unforeseen deteriorated condition of the structural steel was revealed. The entire superstructure was analyzed for stability and soundness and required significant welded reinforcement. It was blasted and coated with Macroproxy as a rust inhibitor to ensure longevity. After coating, the steel panels were reinstalled in their historic position with proper spacing to allow air flow throughout. Finally, all steps, rails, and other fittings were reinstalled, completing the rehabilitation.

Craftsmen with Crown Corr, Inc.

Project Name: Military Construction P3021, Design-Bid-Build of Hangar 21,  Camp Springs, MD
Architect:  FSB Architects and Engineers
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
Crown Corr engineered, coordinated the fabrication of, and installed more than 300,000 SF of metal panels across the entire hangar facility complex and support buildings. The insulated metal wall panels not only provided the watertight barrier but also met the owner’s architectural standards. The aluminum composite metal panels add architectural design and act as a rain screen. Cascade metal panels utilized a concealed fasteners system that finished all penetrations. Custom designed and fabricated for the building specification requirements and elevations, the translucent fiberglass wall panels allowed for the transmittance of light while maintaining the required thermal ratings.

Miscellaneous Metal Fabrication

Francis Charbanneau, Joe Hales, Mathieu Plourde - Berlin Steel Construction Co. and strong> Richard Anno, Theodore Kruse Jr., Joseph Proctor - Premier Consultants International

Project Name: National Air and Space Museum Revitalization,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Quinn Evans Architects
Engineer:  Robert Silman Associates
General Contractor:  Clark/Smoot/Consigli Joint Venture
Scope of work at the National Air and Space Museum revitalization included the installation of both new structural steel members and reinforcement to existing steel. In addition, the team coordinated additional steel needed to attach the stone facade back to the structure. The team carefully planned the installation by surveying the layout of the structure so that the steel supports were properly aligned at the correct joints and elevations of the stone facade. The team sorted, laid out, and installed thousands of dissimilar brackets and shims in their precise locations with attention to the location and to structural requirements, including the amount of weld and tolerances in relation to the distance from existing and new structures.

Craftsmen with American Iron Works, Inc

Project Name: 2100 Penn,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Pelli Clarke Pelli/WDG Architecture
Engineer:  SK&A Structural Engineers, PLLC
General Contractor:  Balfour Beatty
During the planning phases, precise coordination between AIW, the curtainwall subcontractor (Vetro/BV Glazing), the skylight subcontractor (Super Sky), and the Engineer of Record (SK&A) aligned all systems. AIW graciously allowed the construction team to visit their shop on various occasions during fabrication to check production progress. The atrium steel and trusses were set at night as tower cranes were reserved for other daytime work activities. Due to restricted site conditions, steel members were successfully picked from a nearby green space adjacent to an active alley or busy street. Continued coordination with the EOR was required during the installation phase as some connection details were modified to accommodate the existing concrete slab conditions.



Underpinning, Foundations and Excavations

Nathaniel Barksdale, Tim George, Chris Pashkevich, David Reich, Dennis Sheehan, Peter Shirley - Clark Foundations

Project Name: Pepco Takoma,  Hyattsville, MD
Architect:  Sargent & Lundy
Engineer:  EMC2 Inc.
General Contractor:  Clark Civil
Clark Foundations installed a permanent secant wall in a hillside at the Pepco Takoma Substation in Takoma Park, MD. The team drilled through the 1,000 PSI primary shafts to install the secondary piles. Welding J2 teeth to the bottom of the casing, to make it plumb in the shaft, led to faster and more precise drilling. Their benching plan and sequence of the work was to install only certain piles within each bench. They installed 75-foot soldier beams and concrete into the drilled shafts. Facing unforeseen soil and groundwater conditions, they used casing to install tier-four tiebacks. They enlarged the prefabricated tieback holes and installed plates with valves, allowing them to pump grout into the wall and seal off any water.



Artifact Reinstall

Karen Barrow, Mark A. Smith - Century Aviation, Cheena Raiford, Candace Thomas - Crozier Fine Arts and Russ Dusek, Brad Stemcosky - iWeiss Theatrical Solutions

Project Name: National Air and Space Museum Artifact Move Coordination Services,  Washington, DC
General Contractor:  Clark/Smoot/Consigli Joint Venture
The team conducted detailed research to determine attachment points, load and forces imposed on each, and how and in what order to assemble each of these irreplaceable artifacts. The team handled prototype aircrafts, requiring aeronautical and aerospace knowledge and techniques to produce custom tools and fittings to safely complete the job without damaging the artifacts. The team sequenced renovations of the galleries to allow artifact installation at the earliest but safest point possible to meet the museum’s reopening schedule. Artifact rigging connections to the building structure were coordinated with new MEP systems and architectural elements while maintaining design intent. The team finishing on time and on schedule was critical to the project’s success.

Demolition/Shoring

German Cruz, Mike Fadrowski, Christopher Ferris, Pat Greenwell, Nathan Lytle - ACECO, LLC

Project Name: Folger Shakespeare Library Renovation & Addition,  Washington, DC
Architect:  KieranTimberlake
Engineer:  Robert Silman Associates
General Contractor:  Gilbane Building Company
ACECO was contracted to perform the design and installation of the structural support, demolition of the foundation wall, and excavation, all while protecting the historic facade above. To support the existing building wall and facade, a detailed steel support system was installed utilizing the existing interior building columns as the main load bearing elements. Beams, tube steel, needle beams, diagonal braces, and knife plates were installed to support the building wall and exterior facade from the interior columns approximately 12’ away from the wall/facade being supported. This permanent support allowed the foundation wall to be demolished under strict vibration and movement thresholds.

Life Safety

Jeff Anderson, Bob Kerr - Chesapeake Sprinkler Company

Project Name: Northern Virginia Therapeutic Riding Program,  Clifton, VA
Civil Engineer:  Bowman Consulting
Fire Suppression Engineer:  GHD
General Contractor:  TRINITY Group Construction, Inc.
After several rounds of design and testing with the site engineers, sprinkler subcontractor, and county, TRINITY was able to come up with one of a kind, design-build rural fire suppression system designed to NFPA standards. This consisted of adding two underground storage tanks linked together totaling 52,000 gallons that drain into an 18-foot-deep pump house A sprinkler discharge pump was placed on top of the wet well and discharge piping was laid in the ground to the sprinkler room of the main Riding Arena, located approximately 100-feet away from the pump house.

Rainscreen

Andy Barahona, Heber Crispin, Arman Karakaya, David Leutbecker, Eric Muñoz, Ashok Velampalli - Pillar Construction, Inc.

Project Name: Reston Gateway,  Reston, VA
Architect:  Duda|Paine Architects
Engineer:  CFS and Thornton Tomasetti
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
StoVentec Glass Panels made it possible for contractors to use one system to build a geometric structure on an exterior ceiling in a place that faces high winds. To maintain the fatness of each surface of the prisms, nearly 3,000 square feet of StoVentec Glass Panels were attached to a marine-grade plywood substrate. The three diamond-shaped prisms of the bridge are made from 132 uniquely sized glass panels that are all different sizes and finished edge conditions. The plaster soffit reveals correspond to the glass joints to complete the design. The intimate collaboration between the architect’s vision, the ingenuity of CFS’ engineers, STO expertise with panel fabrication, and Pillar Construction ample expertise in rainscreen installation have brought this project to fruition with great value and high level or craftsmanship.
Star Award Nominee

Scaffolding and Rigging

Ronald Avalos, Benjamin Coffey, Bill Drexel, Mark Hill, Raul Ruiz - Scaffold Resource, LLC

Project Name: The Wilson & The Elm,  Bethesda, MD
Architect:  Shalom Baranes Associates
Engineer:  TCE & Associates, Inc.
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
Scaffold Resource provided the suspended dancefloor scaffolding required to access work on the underside of the Level 28 amenity bridge. Scaffold Resource succeeded in designing the unique dancefloor so that is could be suspended from the bridge structure and systematically dismantled in sections to allow for material installation. The dancefloor design also withstood high winds at over 200 feet above the ground. The bridge was successfully used for the safe and efficient installation of the fireproofing, insulation, framing, sheathing, air barrier and metal panels.

Selective Demolition

Hector Cortes, Garrett Hill, Eric King, William Meyers - Interior Specialists Inc.

Project Name: JHU 555 Pennsylvania Avenue,  Washington, DC
Architect:  SmithGroup
Engineer:  LERA Consulting Structural Engineers
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
To remove existing structures while maintaining the structural integrity of the building, demolition had to be heavily coordinated with the installation of new permanent and temporary support structures. The original structure consisted of four “bars”. Demolishing each bar included removing the façade, several 25,000-pound steel bridges, three of the country’s largest hydraulic elevators, and 200,000 pounds of steel as well as cast-in-place structures adjacent to residential areas that remained occupied during construction. ISI proposed a catch deck system during key phases of work to prevent free fall of demolished concrete onto existing structures. This innovative system was engineered, furnished, and installed by ISI and designed to carry rubble, heavy equipment, and craftworkers.

Thermal and Moisture Protection

Mynor Gonzalez, Atallah Khudhager, Gary Lawrence, Rigo Martinez, Fernando Mendez, Ennio Pineda - Prospect Waterproofing Company

Project Name: US Naval Academy Chapel Roofing Renovation,  Annapolis, MD
Architect:  Rogers, Lovelock & Fritz
General Contractor:  G-W Management Services, LLC
Prospect Waterproofing Company’s work on the United States Naval Academy Chapel Roofing Renovation project in Annapolis, Maryland began in 2018 when the nave’s masonry walls were reconstructed due to decades of water infiltration. The roof areas of the nave were scheduled to be replaced as soon as the masonry walls were reconstructed, however, a core cut exposed asbestos within the existing roofing system and abatement activities were added to the scope of the project. Following the asbestos abatement by others the roofs were immediately covered with temporary membrane to maintain the watertight integrity of the roof, which protects the historic interior elements. Roofing areas were completed in turn with the latest in monolithic polyurethane roof membrane systems. The fully soldered copper flat seam eyebrow roof at the popular main entrance was also replaced.



Architectural Millwork

James "Dylan" Ferrell, Tom Hohman, Jin Kim, Anthony Orr, Mark Sutphin, Tuan Vu - Gaithersburg Architectural Millwork

Project Name: 1919 Penn,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Krueck + Sexton Architects
General Contractor:  HBW Construction
Coordination between the trades was critical in making this project successful as the manufacturing of the grid had to be very precise down to the 1/64 of an inch in order to have the spacing and column alignments land correctly. Gaithersburg Architectural Millwork’s drafting and engineering departments played a key role. CAD drawings and computer modeling cut lists for all thread was generated as well as bracket spacing and Unistrut location drawings. The beautiful ceiling was only part of the scope of work for the lobby renovation. 600 linear feet of white oak handrail and base; two floors of rift white oak elevator surrounds door jambs and casings, and one set of rift white oak bleacher seating and coffee shop casework completed the project.
Star Award Nominee

Brian Cross, James "Dylan" Ferrell, Paul Francioli, Frank Hockman, Rocio Perez, Ed Smith - Gaithersburg Architectural Millwork

Project Name: The Herald,  Washington, DC
Architect:  STUDIOS Architecture
Engineer: 
General Contractor:  DFS Construction
The sprawling lobby with a ceiling height of 22 feet welcomes and surrounds you with about 2,800 SF of warm walnut panels and custom hardwood trim which extend into the elevator lobby. Mixed in throughout the space are intricate metal fabricated pieces of oxidized bronze, consisting of approximately 14 ft. tall book shelving units and wall racks as well as copper panels and custom hardwood trims that connect the elevator lobby, conference room, and fitness areas. The main lobby boardroom features a custom-built conference table, which can seat 30 people, with touches of bronze and a dark Marquina porcelain stone top which elevates the room. The pantry and island areas, cabinets were made of the same veneer as the walnut panels and the tops were finished with the same Marquina porcelain stone highlighted in the boardroom as well as in the fitness center restrooms’ countertops. Extending through the fitness area, columns are wrapped in walnut wood panels capped off with the same custom hardwood trims.

George "Mac" Bowling, Brian Cross, Wes Demory, Archie Dodson, Kenny Edwards, Jeffrey Jope - Gaithersburg Architectural Millwork

Project Name: Mintz,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Gensler
Engineer: 
General Contractor:  HITT Contracting
Lacquer panels adorn the walls on the outside of both elevator lobbies. Drawing you into the space, the reception area features a limestone wall and desk with walnut countertops. Seating areas throughout the space feature full wall, lighted veneer encased boxes which display the art collection of the firm. Lacquer panels continue throughout the space, wrapping the outside of the conference rooms. Adorning the walls in the interior of the conference rooms are reconstituted white oak panels which cover both the walls and TV niches. The main pantry has a pleasing mixture of reconstituted white oak and metal. All columns were wrapped with framed metal mesh panels and ¼ inch plate steel which cover the light features and illuminate each column throughout the space. To create an updated contemporary atmosphere, the doorways were framed with black metal.

David Holt - Wilkie-Sanderson

Project Name: Capital One Block C Performing Arts Center,  Tysons, VA
Architect:  HGA
General Contractor:  The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
The Capital One Block C PAC millwork entailed complicated geometry, tight tolerances, theater acoustics and compressed schedule. The scope entailed many complex elements including curved acoustical panels lining the theater walls, balcony fronts, balcony undersides and catwalks. Additionally, scope of work included cabinetry, slatted wood panels lining the outside of the Theater, three levels of acoustical treatments for the south wall of Theater, solid wood panels wrapping the elevator and mechanical chases, miscellaneous wood paneling and the 70’ high slatted wood panel feature wall located in the main lobby.
Star Award for Visual Excellence

Phil Burgess, Eric Ortiz, David Stewart, Paul Tessandori, Tuan Van Mai, Lino Yax-Garcia - USA Millwork

Project Name: Center for American Progress,  Washington, DC
Architect:  OTJ Architects
General Contractor:  D|Watts Construction
USA millwork took the early design renderings and really help bring them to life through multiple rounds of shop drawings and filling in the blanks along the way. It’s amazing how spot on the final product is when compared to the early design renderings. Millwork package features, two (2) custom interior stairs with millwork finishes. Custom veneer wall and ceiling panels with matching frameless doors. Laminate and veneer cabinetry and TV niches throughout the four floors. All done with an aggressive 6-month schedule from release to turnover. The custom veneer panels in the main entrance area that wrap the stair and extend into the 2nd floor pantry ceilings all had to be ordered and fabricated in advance of final framing and stair install being completed to meet the projects aggressive schedule.

Dean Lovell, Angel Escobar Lozano, Francisco Merino Maravilla, William Avila Melendez, Moises Peraza, Henry Alonzo Quezada - ISEC, Inc.

Project Name: Anne Arundel Community College Health and Life Science Building,  Arnold, MD
Architect:  SmithGroup
General Contractor:  The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
This project included thousands of square feet of reclaimed slat wood paneling that was harvested from trees originally on the project site which have amazing character and accent the walls throughout building beautifully. This project also features a complex acoustical wood veneer paneling that is mounted at multiple angles, which required our expert installers to make compound miter cuts to ensure all of the seams to come out identical; multiple custom radiuses surrounds & benches clad with solid surface and reclaimed wood and a 30+ foot decorative exterior glulam columns that required immense amounts on pre-planning and engineering. ISEC custom engineered a rigging mechanism to get these columns installed properly and efficiently.

Guiulianna Constantini, Juan Cuevas, Bob Dodd, Bruno Montano, Gusberth Ortiz, Charles Stanton - Potomac Architectural Millwork

Project Name: Signal House,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Gensler
General Contractor:  John Moriarty & Associates of VA
The lobby and penthouse amenity spaces were designed by EditLab and Streetsense. The design includes custom millwork throughout including inlaid upholstered embroidery wall panels. The penthouse includes a large-scale custom wood carving surrounding the display kitchen. The penthouse also has folding/sliding millwork partitions to create a DJ booth area and podcast recording studio. The custom millwork bar at the penthouse is capped with an etched stone countertop that is finished off with a stacking overhead sectional door so that the bar area is indoor/outdoor. The main lobby includes a custom reception desk, banquette, and recessed seating areas.
Star Award Nominee

Tim Grifin, Richard Memory, Mike Pullen, Tony Quaranto, Randy Tusing, Tom White - Jefferson Millwork & Design Inc.

Project Name: Square 696,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Handel Architects
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
efferson Millwork’s scope of work included architectural millwork in the lobby and on residential floors. Their expertise is seen at each elevator lobby and unit entry, where multi-dimensional carved wood pieces were installed, creating a unique look throughout the corridors. In the lobby, several features reflect Jefferson’s craftsmanship, including six 10-foot pocket doors in the café that sit atop a stone countertop. Jefferson installed the doors three feet in the air while carefully protecting surrounding materials. The café also includes two massive stone and wood islands fitted with mirrors and metal panels that required precise measurement and installation. The West Lobby Lounge is highlighted by large banquette seating and framing covering the green wall’s equipment, which Jefferson coordinated to ensure that all pipes, drains, and equipment were functional and visually appealing.

Nelson Canenguez, Floyd Grant, Mark Lauer, Shawn Lauer, James Maldonado, Pham Nhat-Lang - Washington Woodworking Company

Project Name: Ballston Point,  Arlington, VA
Architect:  Gensler
General Contractor:  HITT Contracting
The new vestibule features a structure of steel tubes clad, glass curtainwalls, and a ribbon of metal Woodskin panels that run horizontally through both glass walls to the exterior. This was the most complicated part of the project as the Woodskin was ordered before the steel or curtainwall were fully designed or built. The design of those elements reacted to the final 3D dimensions of the Woodskin. The manufacturer, Wood-Skin, requires two installers from Italy to oversee the erection of their intricate product. After a few days on the job, they realized James Maldonado with Washington Woodworking had the expertise to lead the install. Washington Woodwork was paramount to successfully installing the second and the largest of this system in North America.

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