2020 Craftsmanship Awards Winners

A next to the project name indicates that the project was nominated for the special Star Award.



Cast-in-Place Concrete

Roy Cruz, Heriberto Camacho Hernandez, Daniela Olguin, Miguel Rivera Portillo, Donald Thurston, Candelario Torres - Christman Mid-Atlantic Constructors, Inc.

Project Name: Ballston Quarter Retail Renovation,  Arlington, VA
Architect:  studio TECHNE architects
Engineer:  Peller & Associates
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
Christman Mid-Atlantic Constructors’ scope of work was to provide the piers, footings, foundations, and the concrete deck of the bridge itself. They began with the concrete footers. The footers had to be moved four times because of abandoned or active utilities underneath Wilson Boulevard. Each time the project team had to move the footers, Christman worked with Clark to recalculate and verify the bolt locations. The new bolt locations on the bridge would intersect with the steel mounting plate locations on the bridge package. Every steel mounting plate was located in a different place, with unique intersections and elevations with the bridge steel. Christman worked with Clark to confirm and recheck bolt packages more than 10 times for the bridge. During the bridge's initial assembly offsite, Christman went to the assembly and proofed their work - they were accurate within 5/8", despite the settling of the bridge that was expected to happen during installation. Christman's accuracy was essential to the successful installation of the bridge.

Jaime Amaya-Hernandez, Erick Alexander Chapa, Hugo A. Del Cid, Carlos Mendez, Jonatan Ramos-Lopez, Jamie Sheftic - Miller & Long DC

Project Name: Capitol Crossing - Buildings/Garage,  Washington, DC
Architects:  Skidmore, Owings & Merrill / Kevin Roche John Dinkeloo & Associates
Engineer:  Leslie E. Robinson Associates / Tadjer Cohen Edelson Associates
General Contractor:  Balfour Beatty
Miller & Long contribution to this project was the placement nearly 70,000 cubic yards of concrete and 10,000 tons of reinforcement steel in mass concrete foundations, large transfer girders and elevated decks, to create the large superstructure that spans three city blocks, five stories below grade known as Capital Crossing garage. Project challenges included the fact that the design of the structure was incomplete at the time of construction. Revisions to the contract documents were issued on a regular basis challenging the project team with coordination of a structure that was constantly changing while having to maintain schedule. The Capital Crossing Garage structure has a deeper foundation than the surrounding buildings, therefore the entire area drained into the excavation. Traditional dewatering measures did not work due to several clay layers in the earth. Workers would often encounter several feet of standing water in their work areas in the morning after a night of rain.

Douglas Guerra Bonilla, Juan A. Carranza-Portillo, Jose N. Lopez, Oscar A. Mendoza-Mendez, Alex Montiel, Mike Smith Sr. - Miller & Long Co., Inc.

Project Name: Capital One Center Garage Podium and Corporate Events Center,  Tysons, VA
Architect:  Gensler
Engineer:  Thornton Tomasetti
General Contractor:  The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
The Capital One Center Garage Podium, Hotel and Corporate Events Center located on Capital One Tower Road is the second phase of Capital One's Corporate Expansion. The project features many exceptional feats of craftsmanship starting with the magnitude of shear walls throughout the Garage, Podium and Hotel Tower. Level 3 is an 80,000 square foot Wegman's grocery store that required approximately 25 feet tall framing above the floor below. The 11th floor Podium is a sky park which will be open to the public. The sky park floor was difficult framing due to the slab thicknesses, multiple top of slab elevations and tree pits and was also heavily reinforced. The Hotel Tower presented its' challenge immediately with a huge portion of cantilevered slab requiring technical expertise from our in house Structural Engineer and substantial framing challenges for all our field personnel.

Precast Concrete

Armando Ambriz, Carlos Ambriz, Maria Ambriz, Raul Cendejas, Antonio Reyes, Pedro Reyes - Arban & Carosi, Inc

Project Name: Portals V,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Robert A.M. Stern Architects, LLP
General Contractor:  Balfour Beatty
This highly customized precast exterior consists of approximately 1,000 pieces of precast constructed from over 800 individual molds. The aggressive construction schedule resulted in many panels being shipped the day after fabrication was completed. Arban & Carosi did an excellent job in sequencing their fabrication and meeting the schedule. Erection of precast was completed mostly during the night shift as concrete on the upper floors was being completed during the day. The numerous exterior skin projections presented unique challenges to the erection team, but with their expertise, they provided solutions to all issues that arose. After erection was complete, Arban & Carosi provided skilled masons to perform quality control on the panels to ensure that the precast met the strict standards of the Architect and Owner.



Doors & Hardware

Michael Grimes, Moises Peraza Nunez, Miguel Sabillon, Jaime Valencia, Oscar Valencia, Justin Wilson - ISEC, Inc.

Project Name: Kennedy Center The REACH,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Steven Holl Architects
General Contractor:  The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
The wood doors on this project are oversized, custom acoustic wood doors, with an average weight of almost 1,000 lbs. per door leaf which adds to the complexity of the installation. Prior to beginning fabrication on all of the custom wood doors for the REACH, ISEC furnished and installed one mock-up wood door over 6 months before they were scheduled to install the remaining doors on the job. The mock-up completed allowed the craftsman to determine the best methods of installation and allowed the architect to review and comment on the outcome of the work rather than waiting for a first-in-place review. In addition, this process aided in identifying quality standards and adjustments needed for adjacent finishes, such as the concrete door openings, in order to provide a seamless final product once the doors arrived onsite.

Exterior Glass

Erik Barriga, Rafael Cordero, Victor Liefke, Alejandro Loyola, Elmer Navarrete, Manuel Ramirez - Service Glass Industries

Project Name: West Half,  Washington, DC
Interior Design Architect:  ODA
Architect:  Eric Colbert and Associates
General Contractor:  HITT Contracting
When watching the construction of the skin on West Half, you would never have believed the challenges that existed because the flow of work appeared seamless. There were major difficulties that made this one of the most challenging glass projects in the city, further proving how proper technical planning was critical to allow the field staff to successfully operate. Service Glass did an amazing job keeping the project operational and making or beating every date set before them. Other than the roof, the entire building skin system was installed by them and they worked directly with the design team to ensure success.

Yoland Leblanc, Nick Potalivo, Grant Vaillancourt, Pat Roach, John Weir - Ferguson Neudorf Glass

Project Name: 4747 Bethesda Avenue,  Bethesda, MD
Architect of Record:  MGMA
Design Architect:  Shalom Baranes Associates
Engineer:  Tadjer Cohen Edelson Associates
Construction Manager:  Lendlease (US) Construction
Ferguson Neudorf Glass went through extensive review of the architectural intent and system performance requirements for the curtainwall and other façade systems before construction documents were finalized. It resulted in improved design efficiency, constructability and cost management and provided a collaborative environment within the team. 2-story curtainwall units; with curved embossed colored stainless steel panels. They look different depending on the lighting condition or time of day, and create a unique appearance. There were many challenges associated with extensive metal finishing process which Ferguson Neudorf Glass managed very well. Point Supported Structural Glass System at the main entrance/ lobby had a very long lead time due to parts shipped from Europe.

Tony Grossi, Yoland Leblanc, John Neudorf, Nick Potalivo, Scott Richards - Ferguson Neudorf Glass

Project Name: 655 New York Avenue, NW,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Shalom Baranes Associates
Engineer:  KCE Structural Engineers
General Contractor:  DAVIS Construction
The quality in both manufacturing and installation work of Ferguson Neudorf Glass (FNG) are evident from every angle at 655 New York Avenue. FNG was responsible for the exterior curtainwall, interior atrium curtainwall, skylight, metal panels, exterior sun shades, and glass doors. While the sheer quantity of work was daunting, FNG planned their deliveries effectively, staffed the job appropriately, and came up with creative solutions to keep their field teams efficient. FNG installed curtainwall directly adjacent, over top, and inside of many of the historic buildings on the site. Despite the close quarters imposed by the historic building, FNG was able to install all their glass without negatively impacting any of the historic buildings. Much of the material for the interior atrium curtainwall was delivered down through the skylight prior to closing it in. The delivery of this material was strictly coordinated between FNG and the tower crane operator. The glass enclosed stair that goes through the atrium was also installed using the tower crane.

Special Feature

Esteban Cervantes, Austin Craw, Joel Gil, Wilmer Oliva - Innovo Construction, LLC

Project Name: Washington Monument Visitor Screening Facility and Repair and Elevator Upgrade,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Beyer Blinder Belle
Engineer:  CH2M
General Contractor:  Grunley Construction Company
This is a unique project, with a double-glazed wall that has a metallic mesh insert and a Level 4 bulletproof glass. Section of the project is also Blast resistant to 4,000psi (first time ever done) standard is 4 to 20psi. Glass needed to be bolted every 4" with 1" Diameter bolts and all hidden by back painted glass. This is a veneer system, every single aluminum member needed to be independently level, squared and plump on-site. Every break metal was cut, notch and install on-site to cover steel structure. Interior glass was field measure and install, where 51 % of it were tapered units with notches, slopes, shapes, etc. The sequence was difficult: the double-glazed wall interior need to be installed first, then the skylight and last the exterior part of the double-glazed wall. The piece on the interior needed to be install, seal, clean, dry and desiccant added, then the exterior side installed before closing the cavity. Wind conditions made it difficult.



Lighting Systems

Evan Daly, Mark Guerzon, Mike Knoble, Jean Pierre Rock Mussalam, Kyle Sudduth, Ronald Sudduth - Power Solutions, LLC

Project Name: Host Hotels and Resort HQ,  Bethesda, MD
Architect:  Gensler
Engineer:  KTA Group
General Contractor:  rand* construction corporation
Power Solutions completed a tenant fit-out at the Host Hotels & Resorts headquarters in Bethesda, Maryland. The 4-floor build out was different from your typical office/tenant fit-out in that the design team included high end finishes such as wood ceiling framing panels, stretched ceiling fabric, and pre-assembled glass walls. Lighting installations throughout the space were particularly challenging due to the complex layout requirements associated with these cutting-edge ceiling designs. Linear fixtures running through the wood panel ceiling were installed to appear as continuous runs even through the top lit glass walls. This required a high degree of precision. There was little room for error. Prior to installation, the fixtures and walls were laid out on the floor to ensure that all lengths and mitered angle cuts were exact.

Dwight Bennett, Mike Conlon, Rick Curl, Adonaldo Jacob Martinez, Daniel Swing, Josh Young - Dynalectric Company

Project Name: General Dynamics Headquarters,  Reston, VA
Architect:  LSM
Engineer:  WSP
General Contractor:  HITT Contracting
The new state of the art facility contains all high efficient LED lighting and complete control by a very elaborate Lutron Dimming and Control System. The lighting system is automated with daylight sensors to control lighting levels. Every office and conference room has occupancy sensors, task lighting, and dimmed control of all fixtures. The building contains multiple board rooms and an auditorium with specialized lighting and controls for presentations and meetings. The site also consists of LED bollards and LED pole fixtures throughout the sprawling site. The site lighting is also controlled by the Lutron lighting control system.

Jason Courtney, Charles DePhillip, Eric Figueroa, Matthew Hallahan, Francis L. Martin, Aaron Steppler-Krieg - JE Richards

Project Name: Kennedy Center The REACH,  Washington, DC
Architect:  BNIM
Engineer:  ARUP
General Contractor:  The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
Star Award Nominee

Power Generation, Distribution and Switchgear

Derek Clark, Dave Maus, Mark McDaniel, Travis Repass, Brian Seiss, Dave Williams - VarcoMac LLC

Project Name: Cyxtera DC2 Reliability Upgrade,  Sterling, VA
Architect/Engineer:  SIGMA7 Design Group
General Contractor:  HITT Contracting
This 4-month project was conceived to provide more reliable emergency power for the client's data halls, involving installation of a new 2.5MW generator, Load Bank switchboards, ATS, and (2) new switchgears, as well as the replacement of existing UPS's with (2) new 1000KVA units. The space has extremely high decks and existing conduits which heavily congest the ceiling space, making installation of new work extremely difficult. To add to the complexity of the project, site delays pushed the installation of the new generator two months. This resulted in the installation of permanent provisions to tie in a temporary generator to complete startup, testing and commissioning of other equipment.

John Jenkins Jr., John Jenkins III, Francis Stransky, Andy Vega, Robert Walker, Anthony B. Wilson - Power Solutions, LLC

Project Name: RagingWire VA4,  Ashburn, VA
Architect:  Corgan
Engineer:  KW Mission Critical Engineering
General Contractor:  Holder Construction Company
This project was a 32 MW build with 20 critical electrical rooms that serve 8 data halls housed in a 284,000 sq. ft. 2-story building. This project also included installation of nearly 23 acres of Fiber and Power infrastructure that was also completed in the 10 month construction and 14 month project schedule. This build began with "VE" Drawings and endured 9 additional revisions packages that were incorporated into the already aggressive schedule. Almost 6 weeks worth of weather delays at the onset of the project along with equipment delays were some of the hurdles that were overcome to energize outdoor MV equipment 12 weeks after the building was erected. 2-12 hour shifts were used to alleviate the crowded work areas, aggressive deadlines and numerous equipment delays.

Jason Jenkins, Tim McDaniel, Ted Sparshott, Charlie Sutton - Singleton Electric Company, Inc.

Project Name: FDIC Electrical Upgrade,  Arlington, VA
Architect/Engineer:  Perkins and Will
General Contractor:  Singleton Electric Company, Inc.
The FDIC VASQ 1 Building is a fully occupied and operational facility that must remain in service 24 hours a day, seven days a week. The project involved building a new electrical equipment room in the parking garage to house a new 4,000A 480V switchboard, (2) new 3,000A 480V ATS's, (2) new 3,000A 480Vswitchboards, and (2) new 1,000A 480Vmotor control centers. This equipment serves mechanical equipment that is critical to building operations. Singleton also installed (2) new 400A main switchboards served by the Utility Company as well as replacing a motor control center on the rood that also serves critical mechanical equipment.

Barry Brittingham, Mark Carter, Bill Eaton, Chuck Renwick, Chris Smith, Don White - Singleton Electric Company, Inc.

Project Name: Ft. Belvoir Secure Administration/Operations Facility,  Ft. Belvoir, VA
Architect/Engineer:  Benham
General Contractor:  Manhattan Construction
The SAOF project was a new building attached to an existing building that was occupied for the duration of the construction. The new construction is powered by (3) 4,000A 480V switchgears, (1) 3,200A 480V switchgear, over 2,000 feet of feeder busduct and 900 feet of Starline bus. The unique aspect of the project was the installation, testing, and commissioning of a Ring Bus UPS system.

Andrew Bean, Jose Orlando Cordova Cubias, Bob Esteppe, Eric Harbour, Gerry Knight, Matt Tomsko - Singleton Electric Company, Inc.

Project Name: Corbalis Treatment Plant Electrical Improvements,  Herndon, VA
Architect:  Jacobs
Engineer:  Fairfax Water
General Contractor:  W. M. Schlosser Company
Singleton Electric craftsmen replaced the 5kV feeders and control wiring to 9 finished water pumps ranging from 1,000 to 1,750 horsepower as well as replacing and reconfiguring the plant wide 5kV distribution feeders totaling over 65,000 feet of new medium voltage cable. In addition to the major work performed under the low demand periods, Singleton performed the equipment upgrades to 13 other production critical buildings during the peak demand season. Many of the areas on this project required the new equipment and raceways to be installed before existing equipment and raceways could be demolished. This required countless hours of planning, coordination and investigation of existing in-service equipment to successfully complete this major upgrade with minimal disruption to plant operations.

Derek Bumgardner, Sam Bumgardner, Steve Crim, Ronnie King, Mark R. Miller, Kyle Pullen - Dynalectric Company

Project Name: Loudoun Center Building 1A,  Ashburn, VA
Architect:  DVA Architects
Engineer:  Morrison Hershfield
General Contractor:  Holder Construction Company
The electrical installation on this project is more of an industrial installation than a normal commercial project using conduit and wire. The entire power distribution system was coordinated and put in a Revit model to verify constructability and clearances. More than 4,000 man hours were spent in the coordination process before any material was ordered or installed. All of the relevant layout points in the entire project, both inside the building and on the site, were laid out using a GPS locating system tied to the coordination drawings. Using the GPS layout equipment the accuracy of the field layout allowed us to install multiple underground conduits in walls and eliminate rework which would have damaged the polished concrete floor surfaces.

Alton Bare, Joseph Eells, James Lusby, Roy Meyer Sr., Joseph Stakem, Fu'a Ta'Amai - Dynalectric Company

Project Name: Capitol Crossing,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Skidmore, Owings & Merrill
Engineer:  STV Incorporated
General Contractor:  Balfour Beatty
The Capitol Crossing project is very unique project with degree of difficulty that is not common on projects in the Washington Area. The power comes from an existing gear room with added drawout switchboards and ATS switches. New feeders and conduit runs feeding the 300 HP fans span from near New York Avenue to E Street NW through the east concourse. This also includes the infrastructure across the highway for 4 additional buildings. This work is intertwined with the new 200 and 250 Mass Avenue office building projects that sit on top of the new tunnel. There are approximately 160,000 feet of feeder conduit between the different services. In addition, new feeders were pulled in existing manholes and ductbanks to different fan rooms on K Street.

Adam J. Boles, Philip H. Buhler IV, Matthew S. Knotts, Kyle S. Murray, Randy A. Sansbury, Jeremy A. Woodall - Merical Electrical Contractors, Inc.

Project Name: Central Utilities Plant Modernization and Upgrade Project,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Hord Coplan Macht, Inc.
Engineer:  Mueller Associates, Inc.
General Contractor:  The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
The Georgetown University Central Utilities Plant Modernization & Upgrade Project scope included installing a 3,700 ton cooling capacity Chiller, installing a 100,000 LB/HR water-tube Boiler, retrofitting (3) existing 100,000 LB/HR water-tube boilers and running all new feeders for the primary and secondary equipment. Merical Electrical Contractors faced various challenges throughout this project which included navigating/routing feeders through a multi-level utility plant, extensive phasing of work to achieve the necessary shutdowns, as well as working with the spatial constraints of an active college campus in Washington, D.C.

William Brandenburg, Rodney Holcomb, Gary Lee, Joshua Martin, Todd Stephens, Jeffrey Woodson - JE Richards

Project Name: Washington Adventist Hospital,  Silver Spring, MD
Architect:  CallisonRTKL
Engineer:  TLC Engineering Solutions
General Contractor:  Turner Construction Company
Installation of power distribution included several hundred thousand feet of exposed conduit along with additional hundreds of thousands of feet of underground conduit resulting in over a million feet of wire being installed for both branch circuits and power distribution. Key distribution components of the overall electrical system for the entire campus included a 1200A 13.2KV Medium voltage distribution board, (6) 13.2 KV transformers, (2) 13.2 KV Distribution selector switches, (4) 1.5 Megawatt emergency generators, 1 state of the art Co-Generator, (4) 4000A normal power switchboards, (2) 4000A emergency power switchboards, (2) 6000A Emergency paralleling switchboards, (3) individual UPS systems and (14) Automatic Transfer Switches. JER installed 354 total electrical panels for both branch circuit and power distribution.

Special Systems

Justin Bond, Jim Downing, Herb Hollar, Tim McDaniel, Joe Robertson, Brian Shaw - Singleton Electric Company, Inc.

Project Name: Corbalis Treatment Plant Electrical Improvements,  Herndon, VA
Architect:  Jacobs
Engineer:  Fairfax Water
General Contractor:  W. M. Schlosser Company
On this project there are various control systems throughout the plant ranging from basic motor controls to a complicated 5kv automatic transfer scheme between (3) new 5kv switchgear lineups, fed from (2) new 35kv substations. Many of the systems are connected to the plant’s existing SCADA system. All work was completed while maintaining the plant’s production throughout the project. Many of the control wire runs are in excess of 500’ ranging from 14AWG to 6AWG control wiring. New controls were connected to various existing instruments and pump systems in multiple buildings throughout the plant. Existing conduits were reused in many areas. This required countless hours of research, investigation of existing in-service systems, planning and coordination to perform the work during minimal outage durations. We pulled over 500,000 feet of control wire and cable to perform this work.

William Artis, Jeff Baggarly, Marvin Barnett, Tanya Filkins, Kevin Hagan, Doug Leggat - Dynalectric Company

Project Name: Loudoun Center Building 1A,  Ashburn, VA
Architect:  DVA Architects
Engineer:  Morrison Hershfield
General Contractor:  Holder Construction Company
Dynalectric installed over 70,000 feet of fiber optic cable in raceways and more than 340,000 feet of Ethernet cable to tie the 37 CP’s from the electrical and mechanical systems back to a central workstation center in the building. All of the terminations were made in the field by Dynalectric technicians who also performed all of the testing on every individual cable and verified all wiring from point to point before any of the equipment was energized or placed in service. The EPMS conduit and system work was performed by a crew of 38 skilled and dedicated union craftsmen who worked over more than 46,000 hours of overtime due to delays in equipment delivery and setup that prevented them from doing their work in a 40 hour workweek. The quality of work that was installed was apparent during the commissioning process where no system failures or improper wiring issues found.

Robert Cooksey, Ryan Gouveia, Keven Sotherd Jr., Ed Smith, Justin Stone, Romain Whyte - Limbach Company, LLC

Project Name: SICPA,  Springfield, VA
Engineer:  ITAC
General Contractor:  The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
This project consisted of a new power feed from DVP along with a new electrical room with power, heat trace, and lighting controls throughout the building, as well as process control System from our two newly installed PLCs. The two PLC cabinets, one for intrinsically safe, and the other for non-intrinsically safe devices are the highlight of this project as there are over 400 controlled valves that stem out from these two PLCs. This entire system is controlled by (3) HMI stations two in the control room and one on the production floor. These head end units control the PLC outputs. The (2) PLC have over 1600 terms with in the PLC’s and another 1600 in the field that are identified with in the EC Drawings from ITAC.

Jonathan Armstrong, Rodney Holcomb, Martin Lang, Joshua Martin, Shawn Sperry, Jonathan Spivey - JE Richards

Project Name: Washington Adventist Hospital,  Silver Spring, MD
Architect:  CallisonRTKL
Engineer:  TLC Engineering Solutions
General Contractor:  Turner Construction Company
The fire alarm system is integrated throughout the entire campus which is made up of 9 levels of administration, patient care rooms, 8 operating rooms, 8 Cath labs, 9 state of the art imaging rooms, and an additional 45 emergency department rooms, a parking garage and the attached central utility plant. The hospitals 9 levels are divided into 36 smoke zones. The fire alarm initiating devices and audio visuals are supported by 44 speaker circuits, 29 booster panels which control a total of 112 strobe circuits and 35 signaling line circuits all of which never cross smokes zones outside of a 2-hour fire rated raceway. A total of 1,740 signaling devices were installed throughout the campus including 205 duct detectors.

Charles DePhillip, Eric Figueroa, Matthew Hallahan, Richard Henry, Kenneth Higgins, Michael Simonds - JE Richards

Project Name: Kennedy Center The REACH,  Washington, DC
Architect:  BNIM
Engineer:  ARUP
General Contractor:  The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
Star Award Nominee



Ceramic Tile and Terrazo

Carlos A. Amaya, Reidy J. Vasquez Arias, Edgar A. Carreto-Ramos, Fidel A. Sandoval Mendoza, Marcos U. Villafuerte - Boatman and Magnani Inc.

Project Name: General Dynamics Headquarters,  Reston, VA
Architect:  LSM
General Contractor:  HITT Contracting
This was an exciting fast paced project where we installed a variety of Porcelain and Stone Tiles in a compact schedule. The most challenging area was the locker rooms in the basement. The floors were mud-set 12" x 24" porcelain tile. The wet walls were a lappato finish porcelain tile. The walls in and out of the showers were the most difficult. They had no horizontal joints from floor to ceiling. Cutting and installing the large panels in and out of light coves required a crew of 6 to carefully lift and place the panels (which weighed 120 lbs.) precisely in exact locations on the walls. One wrong move would have shattered the panel like tempered glass.

Reynaldo Andrade, Ludwing Portillo, Fredy Visacho - R. Bratti Associates, Inc.

Project Name: Portals V,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Robert A.M. Stern Architects, LLP
General Contractor:  Balfour Beatty
The main feature in the lobby is a curved mosaic tile wall with approximately 220,000 1" x 1" square tile pieces in a four-color pattern. The mosaic wall was originally specified from a particular supplier in Turkey, the level of complexity required in the pattern was unachievable with the specified factories capabilities. After nearly a year of attempts to produce the complex design, R. Bratti Associates worked with the Owner and Architect to look for alternate sources for the assembly. Ultimately, R. Bratti Associates ended up back in Italy through a specialty shop.

Desiderio Andrade, Ivaylo Borisov, Guido Oscosiri Claros, Edgar Guzman Merida, Pablo Cezar Condori Perlas, Anna Torre-Smith - ATS Studios, LLC

Project Name: Carnegie Library Apple Store,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Beyer Blinder Belle
The first task was to remove several layers of paint from the tile using environmental friendly stripping agents which would not harm the tile. Then all off the grout was painstakingly removed from in between each tile. Quickly we became aware that due to years of water intrusion from above the ceiling that the grout was the only thing holding some of the tiles in place, so we had to made nets to catch the tiles if they fell out so they wouldn't hit the floor and break. Once all of the paint and grout was removed it became apparent that there was extensive damage to the tiles due to water intrusion over the years. The mold had really taken a toll on the original beauty of the ceiling. Approximately 100 tiles were missing, broken or had holes in them from previous construction. ATS Studios came up with a proprietary mix to make new tiles in molds casted by us in the field. The tiles didn't need to be kiln fired. This saved an extraordinary amount of cost due to the number of tiles that needed to be replaced was much lower than the minimum order required from the only tile company in the world that makes these tiles.

Vishwas Alva, Alex Gavarrete, Telly Koutris, Tony Martinez, Vince McCoy - Aris Tile & Flooring, LLC

Project Name: Portals V,  Washington, DC
Architect:  WDG Architecture
General Contractor:  Balfour Beatty
All materials represent an elite class of high-end 16" x 24" ceramic tile from different sources of materials coming from outside the United States. With over 67 different bathroom layouts, the ceramic tile installation presented many difficult challenges. One such challenge was with the consistency of the layout of ceramic tile joints so that the wall and floor joints would line up. Wall joints would not be noticeable since the pattern included wide tile cuts at both the ceiling and floor levels. The aggressive construction schedule also presented a unique challenge with the installation. Aris Tile did an excellent job in the performance and in quality control management to ensure that the tile installation met with the strict standards of the Architect and Owner; and without impacting Balfour Beatty's schedule.

Ricardo Rosa, Enrique Torres - David Allen Company

Project Name: National Museum of the United States Army,  Ft. Belvoir, VA
Architect:  Skidmore, Owings & Merrill
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
The lobby is the first interior space encountered upon entering the National Museum of the United States Army. It serves as a grand welcoming space that honors the American solider, recognizes the donors that made the museum possible, and provides a record of every military campaign ever undertaken by the United States Army. The aesthetically awe-inspiring flooring consists of a 21-foot diameter terrazzo seal for the Department of the Army - United States of America inlaid in a white field of terrazzo. This seal contains six different terrazzo colors that were custom-made to match the official seal. A large complex seal is a very difficult feature to execute. David Allen used their years of technical experience to achieve an exceptional level of craftsmanship and achieve the necessary high aesthetic standards. All of this work was completed with a white field finish. This unforgiving finish would easily show any blemish or imperfection and could not be easily patched. All these factors taken together demanded the highest level of performance from David Allen.
Star Award Nominee

Drywall

Ronald Diaz, Bill Dick, Elmer Monterosso-Avila, Hector Pineda, Ricky Rodgers - Bradleigh Applications

Project Name: Sixth & Historic Synagogue,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Hartman-Cox Architects
General Contractor:  DAVIS Construction
Drywall construction was incredibly important to this project, since the Sixth & I Synagogue hosts many large events, including musical events where sound quality is a crucial issue, and Bradleigh was impressive in their work. As part of this project, the AV of the space was scheduled to be upgraded-the architect brought out a sound engineer, and Bradleigh installed the BASWAphon product on the existing ceilings above the balcony level. This installation was challenging due to its dry time--BASWAphon is typically the last ceiling finish to be installed and holds multiple layers. At the time of installation, the AC was inoperable due to external construction equipment. The August humidity worked its hardest to slow the drying process, but Bradleigh overcame this obstacle to meet the Synagogue's tight schedule. They also did all the plaster work and repairs to the space. Large sections of existing ceilings needed to be cut out for installation of sprinkler lines, electrical, and AV-completing this process and hiding the patchwork was a difficult task, but Bradleigh retextured the entire ceiling, all with pew benches sitting beneath the workers.

Ben Carper, Rick Finocchiaro, Mike Fleener, Roger Rocha, Mark Schneibolk, Jill Schneibolk Wolfrey - Form Construction Services, Inc.

Project Name: Host Hotels and Resort HQ,  Bethesda, MD
Architect:  Gensler
Engineer:  KTA Group
General Contractor:  rand* construction corporation
The Host Hotels Headquarters project was a four-floor new tenant interior project spanning over 60,000 square feet. The new space is showcased by a complex and sophisticated contemporary design that creates a flagship office space within Bethesda. The project is highlighted by its drywall package that is comprised of a number of custom materials and finishes. The design called for an extensive use of Decoustics ceiling systems with an intricate application integrating with a multitude of materials. This package also includes the use of custom wood Decoustics sourced from Canada. Lengthy lead-times for the custom grid, extrusions, and wood panels were over twelve-weeks of wait time for fabrication and the staggered delivery of the products required an installation in five phases.

Painting & Wallcovering

Christine Davies Anderson, Jonathan Castro, Roly Olivera, Tim Phebus - Hayles and Howe, Inc.

Project Name: Arlington House, The Robert E. Lee Memorial Preservation,  Arlington, VA
Architect:  GWWO Architects
General Contractor:  W. M. Schlosser Company
Hayles and Howe were responsible for the majority of finishes on this project including decorative faux stone exterior paint and interior faux wood finishes, general painting, ashlar stucco restoration for the mansion, roughcast lime stucco at the South Slave Quarters and consolidation of interior lime plaster throughout the mansion. The faux Aquia sandstone paint finishes on the mansion exterior are particularly beautifully-executed by our artisan painters. To achieve a convincing stone finish in paint required moving our skilled painters from elevation to elevation and grouping the individuals painters in rotation so that no one area or elevation appears to repeat particular styles of veining. The roughcast stucco restoration at the South Slave Quarters likewise required an exceptional level of skill and an aesthetic eye for blending new stucco with original for the infill patching that was required.

Plaster

Maximo Soto Albarado, Jose M. Tapia Escobar, Pablo Cesar Condori Perlas, Meliton Soto Quiroz, Maximiliano Ledesma Soto, Elmer Ferrufino Zurita - ATS Studios, LLC

Project Name: DAR Museum Gallery,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Quinn Evans Architects
General Contractor:  The Christman Company
ATS Studios was asked to perform a challenging task of restoration to historic plaster in a building still suffing from earthquake damage and make it meld into something moldern and pleasing to the eye. Our tasks included but were not limited to 3200 sq. ft. of plaster consolidation, 4000 sq. ft. of cove ceilings, soffits and bulkheads and custom sized decorative plaster scrolled arch and keystone detail above the doors. ATS also installed the custom quilt racks which were carefully engineered by the architect and coordinated with design suggestions by ATS to incorporate the racks into the new plaster ceiling. Once the room was demoed and ready for ATS to start it was apparent in the brick foundation that deep crack repairs needed to be made before the plaster repairs could start. ATS is all to familiar with masonry repairs as many of the projects we are on where the plaster is badly damaged or sagging in due in part to the failing masonry. So we worked closely with the GC and architect to agree on an execution of reinforcement and crack repair and move forward with the project at hand.

Christine Davies Anderson, Jonathan Castro, Roly Olivera, Tim Phebus - Hayles and Howe, Inc.

Project Name: Arlington House, The Robert E. Lee Memorial Preservation,  Arlington, VA
Architect:  GWWO Architects
General Contractor:  W. M. Schlosser Company
Hayles and Howe were responsible for the majority of finishes on this project including decorative faux stone exterior paint and interior faux wood finishes, general painting, ashlar stucco restoration for the mansion, roughcast lime stucco at the South Slave Quarters and consolidation of interior lime plaster throughout the mansion. The faux Aquia sandstone paint finishes on the mansion exterior are particularly beautifully-executed by our artisan painters. To achieve a convincing stone finish in paint required moving our skilled painters from elevation to elevation and grouping the individuals painters in rotation so that no one area or elevation appears to repeat particular styles of veining. The roughcast stucco restoration at the South Slave Quarters likewise required an exceptional level of skill and an aesthetic eye for blending new stucco with original for the infill patching that was required. We believe we met the objective of making repairs that nearly disappear and are indistinguishable from the original application.

Windzor Arebalo, Jimmis Cruz, Marvin Fuentes, Orlando Rivera, Jose Rocha, Marco Simon - C.J. Coakley Company

Project Name: Kennedy Center The REACH,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Steven Holl Architects
General Contractor:  The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
C.J. Coakley, was instrumental in achieving the impressive finishes in this building by their execution of the acoustic plaster and curved walls/ceilings. The intricate geometry of the ceiling and wall surfaces added to the difficult execution of this scope of work. The craftsmen had to use a combination of pre-manufactured curved studs and bending studs onsite to achieve the exact geometry and finish elevations as required in the contract documents. When the concrete substrate was not at the exact geometry, C.J. Coakley modified their framing to overcome the substrate inconsistencies, ensuring the plaster or drywall finished product met the design intent. Patching acoustical plaster is notoriously difficult to conceal, however C.J. Coakley flawlessly executed patches in the acoustic plaster resulting from minor damage by others. These patches are nearly invisible.

Ronald Arevalo-Diaz, Delfin Callapa-Patzi, Elmer Monterosso-Avila, Hector Pineda, Jesus Soto-Soto, Santiago Trujillo - Bradleigh Applications

Project Name: National Museum of the United States Army,  Ft. Belvoir, VA
Architect:  Skidmore, Owings & Merrill
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
The quality of craftsmanship is exceptional, which was necessary to meet the purpose of the space. To achieve this, Bradleigh had to coordinate their finishes with laylight glass, campaign streamer glass, fire sprinklers, light fixtures, diffusers, fire alarm devices, stone walls, and adjacent trades trim. To ensure brilliant execution and exceptional craftsmanship, Bradleigh built a full-scale mock up months before work started to assess all potential coordination issues. Bradleigh overcame a very difficult execution by coordinating and sharing equipment with other trades to access the varying levels of work. Bradleigh demonstrated technical excellence by assisting with identifying and resolving issues. For example, the thickness of the originally designed 1 9/16" thick BASWAphon soffits and walls was too great to work with glass and would not have aligned with the terrazzo base and stone cladding. Bradleigh developed a solution with the design team that switched portions of the ceilings and walls to a thinner 19mm / 25mm Star Silent while maintaining the acoustical design goals of the project.



Exterior Stone

Carlos Bonilla, Ramiro Carrillo, Jose Gamez, Edwin Reyes - Ruppert Landscape

Project Name: The Boro A & B - Rise. Bolden. Verse,  Tysons, VA
Architect:  LandDesign
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
Ruppert’s scope included the landscape on the ground level, 7th floor, 9th floor podium and 27th floor. Ruppert installed 110 trees, over 600 shrubs, 4,200 perennials, grasses and groundcover and site amenities as well as 6240 sf. of artificial turf, irrigation and intricate check dam installations in the bioretention facilities. Additionally on the ground level, Ruppert installed 610 on structure silva cells which included 1000 cubic yards of root zone capacity topsoil for the 24 street trees on Boro Place. The landscape on the 9th floor podium level included the plant material, artificial turf for the movie viewing area, bocce court, fireplace and irrigation. Ruppert installed pavers on the ground level, 2nd, 7th, 8th, 9th floor podium, 13th, 15th, 25th and 27th floors for a total of 20,496 sf. Coordinating the various levels of pavers was the most challenging aspect of this project due to the difficult access.

Daniel C. Kozak, Ronald S. Wondoloski - Boatman and Magnani Inc.

Project Name: Private Residence,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Arentz Landscape Architects
General Contractor:  Horizon Builders
This unique private residence site was transformed into a tranquil garden room oasis with the use of Indiana Limestone, North Carolina Granite, Chinese Granite and local Field Stone. The craftsmen were faced with minimal access to the yard area requiring old School lifting tactics and muscle. The installation required meticulous masonry skills and creating vision to achieve the Architect's design intent. Pieces of granite and limestone were hand cut on site and fit together to craft a natural appearance. A garage rooftop was transformed into a secret garden. Boatman and Magnani's Stone Masons coordinated on a daily basis regardless of weather with the design team and general contractor in order to meet the aggressive schedule and extraordinary expectations. The mason's tireless commitment to the project exceeded expectations and met the schedule on time.

Candido Abundez Abundez, William Angel Arevalo, Jose Ramon Casal Campos, Francisco Castro Freijo, Manuel Rial Perez, Ivan Sieiro - Lorton Stone, LLC

Project Name: Carnegie Library Renovation,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Beyer Blinder Belle
Engineer:  Limbach Company, LLC
General Contractor:  Grunley Construction Company
Lorton's team performed stone carving and installation, 100% general and spot cleaning of all elevations, restoration of the South plaza, restoration of the historic marble interior grand stairs, and a handful of new stone operations. Repairs completed include hand carving and installation of 20 Beaux-Arts style triangular pediments, 10 scrolls, four whole column bases, eight brackets, three window sills, as well as many other miscellaneous smaller carved and flat dutchman repairs. The project also involved fabrication and installation of new stone including 22 mountain white marble interior columns, new mountain white marble bases throughout the building, new monumental granite stairs at the North entry, new stairs at the South plaza, reconstruction of the bottom of the grand stairs to reflect the original design, and other miscellaneous installations.
Star Award Nominee

Mauricio Viera Bonilla, Garry Cobb Jr., Joe Sieiro Garcia, Ciro Cardona Granados, Jose Carlos Cerqueira Marinho, Josue Melgar Portillo - Lorton Stone, LLC

Project Name: National Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Gehry Partners
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
Lorton Stone, LLC began working on the Eisenhower Memorial in 2017 on front end design, coordination, and material procurement efforts. All hardscape elements are clad in Spanish Ambar Limestone, quarried from a mountain in Huescar, Spain and fabricated near Alicante, Spain. The use of limestone for hardscape elements in Washington, DC's freeze thaw environment inspired extensive quality control oversight and testing to ensure the suitability of the stone. Project team members traveled overseas almost monthly for quality control, production, and coordination purposes. There are two Memorial Blocks that serve as the central point of the memorial. Each one consists of three tiers of offset, cast-in-place concrete blocks that were cladded in the Spanish Am bar Limestone.

Vicente Guevara, Ray Harley, Bob Markoff, Arnulfo D. Orellana, Miguel Quezeda - Calvert Masonry

Project Name: 4040 Wilson Boulevard,  Arlington, VA
Architect:  CallisonRTKL
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
Calvert Masonry's scope of work included the installation of brick veneer facing for the building and brick facing for the site walls. In addition, Calvert's scope of work included cast stone copings. Calvert installed 45,500 SF of brick at the building façade. They were able to install the brick within the schedule of 30 weeks. They were able to install the bricks at and above industry standard rates. The building façade consists of five different types of colored bricks. Calvert was able to maintain the installation speed while working with the five types of colored brick. The building façade consists of unique conditions which require the proper transitions between brick types. The ground and second floor consist of a different brick color configuration than the remainder of the building. Throughout the façade, there are accent bands to highlight the brick work. Also, there is a cast stone band to accent the transition from the office floors and the residential floors.

Interior Stone & Marble

Juan Manuel Merino Gomez, Francisco Lorenzo, Cesar Menjivar, Juan Morillo - Lorton Stone, LLC

Project Name: Capitol Crossing,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Kevin Roche John Dinkeloo & Associates LLC
General Contractor:  Balfour Beatty
Lorton Stone was involved early on with the design team in the selection of materials, mock-ups, and hands-on review of installed materials. Lorton's early detailing of their drawings from multiple vendors and coordination with adjacent materials allowed for an efficient installation of 17,000 square feet of floor stone with multiple patterns and SS inset strips along with five double-sided 30-foot-tall feature walls. Throughout the main lobby of 250 Massachusetts Avenue, all of the stone design elements from the floor, feature walls, bench, stairs, desk, and wall stone were delivered with a high level of craftsmanship and execution of interface and alignments with adjacent materials that our hands on Owner is thrilled with.

Miguel A. Diaz Fuentes, Victor Lemus, Daniel E. Mazariego - R. Bratti Associates, Inc.

Project Name: Portals V,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Robert A.M. Stern Architects, LLP
General Contractor:  Balfour Beatty
The stone and marble work at Portals V consists of public space areas, particularly at the second and third floors, and consists of about a dozen different species of materials. The jobsite conditions represented the usual difficulty in the public space, which was the main thoroughfare for most of construction. This was especially challenging in a building of this size with several hundred units in a downtown environment. Of particular note are the spiral stairs and the elliptical paving areas which were designed to fit within an equal sized space comprised of many pieces. Geometric shapes and setting patterns for strong characters of stones create a strong optical impression that is unique to the DC environment; the overall texture of the stone flooring, walls, and stairs is unique and different.

Juan H. Aparicio, Donadin Mejia Bonilla, Michael Geisler, Patrick Kiernan, Jose Ordonez Murillo, Wilver Zavala - Rugo Stone, LLC

Project Name: 655 New York Avenue, NW,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Shalom Baranes Associates
Engineer:  Dewberry
General Contractor:  DAVIS Construction
Rugo Stone installed wall stone throughout the new 12,000-SF lobby at 655 New York Avenue using imported stone from Canada and Italy. They also installed stone for two concierge desks, a hearth for the penthouse fireplace, and curved stone planter walls. While the design called for open joint stone in the lobby, due to limited availability of the preferred Italian stone thinner pieces (2cm) had to be used instead of the originally planned 3cm. Rugo assisted with a mock-up far in advance of installation determining that shims between pieces would be noticeable at open joints in the 2cm stone. Ultimately, the attachment method was revised for all of the Italian wall stone, requiring the hanging of each piece individually from the back to avoid shims between the pieces.

David M. Fitchett III, David B. Kirby - Boatman and Magnani Inc.

Project Name: General Dynamics Headquarters,  Reston, VA
Architect:  LSM
General Contractor:  HITT Contracting
The new General Dynamics Headquarters in Reston, VA is an excellent representation of skillful travertine and marble installation. Over 10,000 sf. of filled Roman Travertine paving and stairs, nearly 4,000 sf. of unfilled Roman Travertine walls, and numerous custom vanities and serveries were made of White Sponda Marble and were installed precisely over unusual substrates under a compressed schedule. To ensure consistency of the final installation and to meet the Architect's vision, all floors and walls were drylayed prior to placement. The large-format paving was then installed over a hydronic system with tight joints while maintaining exact alignment with stone walls and other architectural features.

Unit Masonry

Carlos Cruz, Humberto Espinoza-Tapia, Blake Pappas, Michael Pappas, Tranquilino Villegas - Telligent Masonry, LLC

Project Name: Ripley East - Solaire 8250,  Silver Spring, MD
Architect:  Design Collective
Engineer:  Tadjer Cohen Edelson Associates
General Contractor:  Lendlease (US) Construction
Taking one look at the immense detail and sheer area of masonry veneer without question puts Solaire on a whole new masonry level. The beauty of this project can be seen through the relentlessly interchanging courses of brick throughout the building continually switching from being recessed to corbelled, creating an appealing and incredibly difficult, intricate design. The brickwork was challenging by more than just the complex design of the façade. For example, the jobsite was incredibly tight being right on Georgia Ave, with access around the project nonexistent. Not only did crews have to take extreme caution in not letting any materials or equipment fall to the busy street directly below, but also there was only one entrance to the site creating deliveries and logistics to be extremely difficult to deal with.



HVAC-Piping

Tarek Geblaoui, Josh Green, Ben Hyrkas, Steve Leinneweber, Todd Owens, Tom Shumaker - Heffron Company

Project Name: United Therapeutics - DDOMAL Project,  Silver Spring, MD
Architect:  EwingCole
Engineer:  IPS
General Contractor:  The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
Due to the GMP requirements of cleanroom manufacturing facility the building has a robust HVAC system. One of the most challenging components of the project besides the expedited schedule was trying to fit all of the building HVAC and process systems into the small floor footprints. The facility is 100% dedicated to production. There is minimal facility support areas (approx. 300 sf. is for a front lobby and two single bathrooms). The building is 5 stories and is comprised of the following levels averaging about 5,000sf each: Cellar (Mechanical & Process Equipment), 1st Floor Cleanroom Space, 2nd Level Mechanical Mezzanine, 3rd Floor Cleanroom Space, 4th Floor Mechanical Mezzanine, 5th Floor Cleanroom Space and a rooftop mechanical space. Due to the small footprint of each floor, the mechanical levels have dense mechanical, electrical, plumbing utilities to feed the cleanroom spaces.

William Avelar, Donald Gue, Chris Lacasse, Saul Molina, Jimmy Patton, Richard A. Smith - Shapiro & Duncan, Inc.

Project Name: INOVA Loudoun Phase 2B Patient Tower,  Leesburg, VA
Architect:  HDR Architecture
Engineer:  Valley Engineering
General Contractor:  DPR Construction
Key elements of the project scope required the Shapiro & Duncan team to model, fabricate and install the mechanical systems within the new Patient Tower building facility. This included all new equipment, and the furnishing, delivery, and installation of new HVAC implements, as well as mechanical and plumbing pipe systems and related fixtures and equipment. Additionally, once new systems were installed, they were connected to the building automation system in the existing hospital building. From a quality in craftsmanship standpoint, prior to the project start, Shapiro & Duncan first developed a coordinated model using its Building Information Modeling (BIM) process. From there, the model was refined and detailed spool drawings were produced and uploaded with our Fab Pro system to digital work stations and equipment on the Fab Shop floor where the piping, fittings, valves, strainers and more move through the assembly line with the pre-fabrication team to create clean, high quality piping assemblies in a controlled environment then stored and “just in time” shipped to the job site a few days before installation. This process provides a higher level of quality assurance in the craftsmanship of the finished product.

Ian Brady, Daniel Cook, Sonny Edwards, Joseph Haines, Daniel Hanson, Jeff Schwabline - Southland Industries

Project Name: National Museum of the United States Army,  Ft. Belvoir, VA
Architect:  Skidmore, Owings & Merrill
Engineer:  Southland Industries
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
The mechanical system for the National Museum of the United States Army is actually two individual mechanical systems that feed the Exhibit Hall and remaining museum spaces separately. Southland Industries' scope of work for HVAC piping included running all of the hot and chilled water to all pieces of equipment. As the museum has two individual mechanical systems, Southland was required to do twice the amount of work in one footprint. Due to the 30-foot ceilings in the Exhibit Hall and 20-foot ceilings in the entrance lobby, Southland created a secondary means to provide comfort to museum patrons since forced air from overhead was difficult to reach the lower half of those spaces. Southland Industries ran approximately 21 miles of radiant PEX piping within the Exhibit Hall and entrance lobby slabs on grade. To achieve this, Southland and other trades created a slab on grade mock-up to understand the time requirements and sequencing.

HVAC-Sheet Metal

Aaron Ittenbach, Russel Johns, Darrel Milstead, Jimmy Redding, Ben Roe, Ray Sprouse - ADJ Sheet Metal, Inc.

Project Name: Carnegie Library Renovation,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Beyer Blinder Belle
Engineer:  Limbach Company, LLC
General Contractor:  Grunley Construction Company
ADJ's mechanical workmanship and expertise was integral to the overall success of the Carnegie Library Renovation project. The ADJ team did well at accounting for and adjusting to tight design tolerances and unforeseen existing building conditions. For example, ADJ used a cavity 4 1/2” wide within a load-bearing wall to transition between floors and around a steel beam to service a supply air diffuser serving as a critical architectural element. ADJ had to resize the ductwork down to 48 x 4 and run it at a 45-degree angle between beam and wall and make the piece long enough to make the connections before the beam and wall. At Carnegie, ADJ’s team also installed underground ductwork throughout the basement to serve as the main distribution from the sub-basement mechanical room to the wings of the building. Coordination and layout were paramount to confirm upturns into the spaces above were exact to fit within future cavity spaces.

Navarro Blakes, Gregg Friedman, Wayne Monroe, Ray Ostenso, Kevin Ramsey, Bobby Roberts - Southland Industries

Project Name: National Museum of the United States Army,  Ft. Belvoir, VA
Architect:  Skidmore, Owings & Merrill
Engineer:  Southland Industries
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
Southland Industries was provided architectural and structural designs to fit their design­build mechanical system within. Southland's HVAC sheet metal scope of work included installing all of the duct work that feeds the building's two mechanical systems. This included running massive ducts across the span of the Exhibit Hall and all of the duct work found throughout the rest of the museum. The Exhibit Hall space is conditioned from mechanical located in the basement area directly underneath the space. Conditioned air is supplied by a 30,000 CFM capacity Dedicated Outdoor Air Unit (DOAS-1) and fed through a combination of fabric and hard duct, all with a black finish to conceal and avoid detracting from the exhibit features. The supplied air is tempered and condition to meet the strict museum-level requirements to protect all of the priceless artifacts and, in combination with radiant PEX piping, keep museum patrons and staff comfortable. Within the Exhibit Hall is the Army Theater, which is serviced additionally by its own dedicated Air Handling Unit (AHU-1, 4,600 CFM) to handle the additional loads imposed by the projectors and theater visitors.

Plumbing

William Avelar, Donald Gue, Chris Lacasse, Saul Molina, Jimmy Patton, Richard A. Smith - Shapiro & Duncan, Inc.

Project Name: INOVA Loudoun Phase 2B Patient Tower,  Leesburg, VA
Architect:  HDR Architecture
Engineer:  Valley Engineering
General Contractor:  DPR Construction
Embraced the concept of true team partner on project. Always ensuring to achieve milestones and deadlines. Close coordination with design and engineering. Excellent quality focus for each element of work.

Bob Hauck, Michael Hauck, Shawn Mussamatxa, Cody Snyder, Herald Snyder, Tim Williams - Northstar Fire Protection

Project Name: Sixth & Historic Synagogue,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Hartman-Cox Architects
Engineer:  Henry Adams, LLC
General Contractor:  DAVIS Construction
The work consisted of a new a fire sprinkler, new generator, new finishes and lighting in the sanctuary as well as some new upgrades to the administration building. This historic building (built in 1908) never had a sprinkler installed, and the wood structure was not built with the infrastructure and space a sprinkler system usually requires. They met these challenges head-on, doing the complete sprinkler design from the very beginning, and reviewing existing conditions and codes to design the right type of pump system. Some areas throughout the building had both dry and wet systems installed, adding further complications, and these extended review processes were time-consuming. However, Northstar Fire Protection worked tirelessly to meet the tight schedule. Additionally, as part of this installation, a new water service was required, which took time and planning with DC Water.



Metal Panels

Rick Dickens, Ron Neff, Tyler Vogel, David Watson - Tecta America East, LLC

Project Name: National Museum of the United States Army,  Ft. Belvoir, VA
Architect:  Skidmore, Owings & Merrill
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
The National Museum of the United States Army features over 3,000 metal panels, accounting for over one million pounds of stainless steel. Aside from the magnitude and the aesthetic of these beautiful panels, the coordination efforts that Tecta undertook to complete installation makes them truly exceptional. The panels range in sizes, with the largest being 3' x 20' tall. The metal panels act as a rain screen installed on adjustable I-angles to ensure the panels met required flatness criteria. Due to the connection clips between panels, only horizontal runs of panels could be installed at one time, with Tecta moving up to the next rows for the various building elevations.

Miscellaneous Metal Fabrication

Michael J. Burros, Oscar Flores, Andreas Pappas, Jose Villatoro, Robert Windsor, Nicholas Zorica - TLP Steel Erectors

Project Name: Tegna,  McLean, VA
Architect:  LSM
Engineer:  SK&A Structural Engineers, PLLC
General Contractor:  rand* construction corporation
The complex design required the installation of a new stair to service the space. Fabrication was especially challenging due to the stringer profile being continuously welded with built up steel plates. Installation was a challenge in regards to erecting temporary shoring as the work had to be performed off of tall lifts to set the mid landings of the stair so high off of the slab. The design required wet poured glass which is especially challenging in place along a slope. The sequencing of the installation was critical due to the requirement to access areas utilizing lifts for the bondo work under the stair before welding in treads. All of the stainless steel #8 handrail brackets had to be customized and needed a significant amount of time and coordination with other materials to weld and polish each brackets by hand.

Ornamental Metal

Noe Carballo, Luis Cespedes, Erick Garcia, Troy Knotts, Jason Taylor, Byeong Yoon - Emerald Ironworks

Project Name: JBG SMITH Headquarters,  Bethesda, MD
Architect:  Partners By Design
General Contractor:  DAVIS Construction
The steel throughout the space has a consistent and aesthetically pleasing blackened finish, which was extremely difficult to achieve, especially at field welded connections. Emerald Ironworks’ proprietary steel finishing process provides consistent texture and color to make those connections appear seamless without needing paint or any other coating. EIW’s finish was key in their selection for the project and their ability to collaborate on even the most minute details set them apart from other subcontractors. The ornamental metals in this space are heavy steel plate, bar stock, and tube steel. Given the mass and weight of the steel, handling these materials was a daunting and arduous process—however, EIW worked carefully and meticulously to create the “polished industrial” aesthetic found throughout the space. This was especially evident when constructing the hanging steel feature on the 4th floor’s lunchroom, which was designed to appear floating! Coordination between trades also proved to be difficult at times.

Structural Steel Framing

Jeffrey Colyer, Anthony Kapusta, Randy Keller, Robert Ocasio, Keith Retallack, Paul Sweigart - Crystal Steel Fabricators, Inc.

Project Name: National Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Gehry Partners
Engineer:  Magnusson Klemencic Associates
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
The top of the tapestry is supported and framed by an architecturally exposed structural steel box beam that was fabricated and installed by the Crystal Steel Fabricators team. This beam spans the full tapestry. Fabricated in five sections, each just less than 87' long and weighing about 56,000 pounds, the design called for exacting chamber requirements of 1/4". The Crystal Steel Fabricators fabrication team performed this exactly; adding 1/4" chambers into each of the nearly 90' built-up stainless steel beam sections. To anchor the 12 cables that span the system are 72 stainless steel "saddles", each required to be set in an exact three-dimensional location. This was executed flawlessly by the Crystal Steel Fabricators team. Finally, the bottom of the support system consists of a suspended stainless steel light trough that will house 176 LED light fixtures to illuminate the tapestry at night. This, too, was fabricated and installed by the Crystal Steel Fabricators team.

Scott Christensen, Hung Huynh, Howard Johnson, Richard Johnson, Jonathan Reed, Jassiel Vargas - Superior Iron Works, Inc.

Project Name: Capitol Crossing,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Kevin Roche John Dinkeloo & Associates LLC
Engineer:  ARUP
General Contractor:  Balfour Beatty
The technical complexities and unique nature of the structural steel pedestrian bridge at Northwest DC’s Capital Crossing development is like no other. Although the overall look of the structure is impressive, the design, fabrication, and installation of this bridge is what sets it apart. The more than 49,000-pound structure took over a year to finalize the design and coordinate the integrated curtainwall façade and electrochromic glass roof structure. Multiple design charates were held to ensure all of these intersecting trade details worked seamlessly. Once coordination was complete, fabrication of the structure could begin. The design specification required all structural members of the bridge be constructed to an AESS Level 4 architecturally metal standard. These standards require a significantly higher level of effort to be poured into the welding, grinding, and ultimate handling of the steel members. This standard forces the massive steel components to be treated as though they are ornamental metal.

Noe Carballo, Luis Cespedes, Erick Garcia, Troy Knotts, Jason Taylor, Byeong Yoon - Emerald Ironworks

Project Name: JBG SMITH Headquarters,  Bethesda, MD
Architect:  Partners By Design
General Contractor:  DAVIS Construction
Emerald Ironworks finish was key in their selection for the project, as a very specific “polished industrial” look was intended for the space. All steel throughout the space has a consistent blackened finish—a difficult finish to achieve at field welded connections. Delivering materials proved tough as well, given the below tenant’s location, and they were forced to install the 2nd floor stairs during off-hours. This installation included additional challenges, as the railing post was sandwiched by inner and outer stringer posts. These posts had to be put together separately and aligned perfectly for the proper bolt installation. Additionally, large slab edge steel channels and plates had to be rigged so that all mitered corners could be seamlessly finished, and the welding and finishing of the joints had to be done perfectly, with no traces left behind.

Sam Coffman, Henry Duncan, Brent Elliott, Ronald Fitzerald, Christopher Motes, Tomasz Pasierb - SteelFab, Inc.

Project Name: Capital One Hall,  Tysons, VA
Architect:  HGA
Engineer:  Thornton Tomasetti
General Contractor:  The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
The prominent steel features in Area 1 are the large roof trusses and monumental stair Q. Each roof truss was shipped broken down in three shop built pieces, field assembled and hoisted into place as one piece. Area 2 is the most traditional steel framed area of the entire building, but because it was the first area which we erected, it highlighted some of the challenges which we would face throughout the duration of the project. The most noticeable steel feature of Area 3 is the grand monumental stair. Other unique features of area 3 are the roof trusses and balconies which cantilever from the concrete shear wall and are hung from the roof trusses above. Area 4 is the stage area of the building. Very densely packed into a smaller square footage, Area 4 had some of the more complicated fabrication in the project including the raker trusses and balcony framing, catwalks and rigging steel and more roof trusses. The steel in this area also interacted with specialized acoustical pads to help separate the theater steel from the rest of the structure.

Russell Bell, Chuck Jones, Mark Stryker, Jim Yowell, John Yowell, Mike Yowell - Maryland Fabricators Inc.

Project Name: City Ridge,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Shalom Baranes Associates
Engineer:  Tadjer Cohen Edelson Associates
General Contractor:  The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
The scope to lower the existing building foundations involves a 27-step foundation lowering process involving six separate subcontractors, three individual Design Engineers of Record, and several rounds of milestone inspections by all parties. The lowering of the 96 existing columns was broken down into the 13 sequences. Due to structural limitations only certain combinations of sequences could be executed concurrently to maintain structural stability of the building during the lowering process. Due to the complexity of work and numerous areas of work taking place simultaneously the team created a Sequence Matrix, a Sequence of Work and Responsibility Document, and a Foundation Lowering Quality Control Log to manage the flow of work in a safe and efficient manner. The team members knew it was critical that the building facade stay intact not only as a safety and structural concern, but to preserve the facade so that the existing masonry appeared untouched.



Underpinning, Foundations and Excavations

Nolan Adams, Victor M. Alfaro, Nick Custead, Jaime Rodriguez Guevara, Anthony Riviello, Eric Tyler - Quality Pipe Cleaning

Project Name: Suburban Hospital Campus Enhancement Phase 2,  Bethesda, MD
Architect:  Wilmot Sanz
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
Quality Pipe Cleaning's excavation efforts began with the development of a confined-space safety plan. Then, the hydro-excavation hoses were set up below the active emergency department. These hoses ran adjacent to active conference rooms on racks mounted from the ceiling. Quality Pipe Cleaning's team loosened the soil with pressurized water hoses so that it could be collected by a vacuum hose. For rocks too large for the vacuum, the team broke down the larger rocks and transported them out of the excavation area via the hospital's loading dock. Quality Pipe Cleaning was an extremely cooperative partner in the effort to execute a somewhat non-conventional approach to excavation in healthcare construction, which resulted in schedule savings.

James Baisden, Stephen Harris, Mike Hibbard, Jamie Joya, Oscar Mejia, Carlos Morales - Berkel & Company Contractors, Inc.

Project Name: City Ridge,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Shalom Baranes Associates
Engineer:  Tadjer Cohen Edelson Associates
General Contractor:  The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company
This exciting and unique project is broken into two phases - Phase 1 and Phase 2. The first phase of the project includes lowering the foundation of the historic Fannie Mae building (currently building A on the project) to increase ceiling height and allow for a new Wegman's Food Market underneath. Wegmans will anchor the mixed-use site behind Building A leaving the existing Building A to remain similar in appearance from Wisconsin Ave NW. The existing building has a center wing that was built in 1956 on pile cap foundations, and two side wings that were added in 1962 on caisson foundations. The footprint of the composite building for lowering is roughly 40,000 square feet.

Utilities

Eduardo Garcia, John Gwin, Steve McCarty, Kevin Murray, Kallen Myers, Juan Villanueva - Garney Construction Company,

Project Name: Outside Rt 66 Jermantown Road 24" Watermain,  Fairfax, VA
Engineer:  Michael Baker International
General Contractor:  FAM 66
In 2017, construction began on the "Transform 66 Outside the Beltway" improvement project. The project will add 22.5 miles (36.2 km) of new dynamically-tolled Express Lanes alongside I-66 from I-495 to University Boulevard in Gainesville. Traffic at our intersection is ranked as one of the busiest roadways in the United States: 139,600 vehicles - 279,200 passengers, per day - or - 700,000 vehicles and 1,400,000 passengers per week and 36,296,000 cars - 72,592,000 passengers per year. Garney was tasked with installing a 16" & 24" DIP Water Force Main with a 30" steel casing both on Jermantown Road and under Interstate 66 in Northern Virginia for fam66 and Fairfax Water. The tie-ins occurred above interstate 66 onto Jermantown Road.



Demolition

Dave Cavanagh, Jeff Gayon, Melvin Solis - Celtic Demolition

Project Name: 1050 17th Street,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Gensler
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
Celtic Demolition successfully demolished the existing 12-story office building in downtown Washington, DC using remote controlled Brokk demolition robots over the course of six months in 2018. This demolition occurred less than 10 feet from the building to the west and six inches from the building to the south. The north and east sides of the structure were less than 15 feet from active downtown roadways. The project grew more complex as the demolition progressed through the existing garage slabs. Removing too much of the slab could have resulted in a catastrophic structural failure of the existing foundation wall supporting adjacent buildings. Despite this potential hazard, Celtic brilliantly executed a complicated sequence of their work activities to prevent downtime for their employees while Clark Foundations installed structural support - often feet from Celtic's employees.

Historic Culvert

George Armstrong, Octavio Hernandes, Edgar Martinez, Transito Nolasco, Victor Rodrigues, Jose Saravia - Anchor Construction Corporation

Project Name: 44th & Reservoir Road Rehab Culvert,  Washington, DC
General Contractor:  DC Water
Anchor was called to an emergency flooding of a culvert, located in a downward walk of a 45degree angle off of the 44th St NW area. Crews worked around the clock, filling sand bags and lowering them with a conveyor belt system to make the area below safe for access, and built a 100 foot step system to get down to the project, while be tied off to a guardrail system for security purposes. Inside the culvert it was discovered that the roof of the culvert had approximately a 130 ft. long crack down the center and was compromised. This culvert was holding up a historical rock bridge system that was underneath 44th street in NPS area. Leading from one side of 44th to the other side of 44th down to continue into NPS area. The ceiling of the culvert was repaired using rebar, shotcrete, and other products to stabilize it. It was then noticed that the sides of the culvert had structural damage as well and they were shotcreted along with rebar reinforced. New foundations were poured for the edges of the bridge to stabilize it since there were numerous stones missing, and a shift of over 4" away from the foundation wall.

Rainscreen

Marcus Gough, Chris Lemmon, Derek Taylor, Rich Sunyoger - Kalkreuth Roofing and Sheet Metal, Inc.

Project Name: INOVA Loudoun Phase 2B Patient Tower,  Leesburg, VA
Architect:  HDR Architecture
General Contractor:  DPR Construction
Proprietary metal panel system with a complicated vertical and horizontal joint alignment. Bull-nose curved panels at penthouse and roof - creates "airline wing" slope - extremely difficult installation. Managed through critical timing of field measurements and manufacture issues (manufacturer ended up going out of business). Extreme level of craftsmanship and quality control. Fixed any issues before they were written up by DPR.

Walter Calderon, Cando Gonzalez, Oscar Hernandez, Jose Martinez, Armando Pineda, Andrew Taylor - Calvert Masonry

Project Name: The Heights Building,  Arlington, VA
Architects:  Leo A. Daly & BIG
Engineer:  Robert Silman Associates
General Contractor:  Gilbane Building Company
The structure consists of over 2,300 tons of structural steel and the façade included 30,000 square feet of curtain wall and 34,000 square feet of brick rainscreen, complimented with precast panels and metal panel systems at select elevations. The Corium Brick Rainscreen system was utilized for this project, and consists of a special molded gloss-white brick whose profile allows it to snap-in to a horizontal tray system, which fastens to vertical steel support clips attached to the substrate. The system is left with open joints at the top and bottom to allow for proper air flow, drainage, and moisture evaporation. Calvert Masonry installed all of the components, in addition to a complete Air Barrier system inspected by ABAA, 6,000 Veneer Backup CMU, and 24,000 interior CMU.
Star Award Nominee

Roofing

Obed Hernandez, Ariel Lemus, Victor Lopez, Fredy Navarrete, Andrew Tybor, - Wagner Roofing Company

Project Name: Annapolis Post Office Restoration,  Annapolis, MD
Architect:  Ziger|Snead Architects
Engineer:  Keast & Hood Co.
General Contractor:  Consigli Construction Co., Inc.
The revitalized Annapolis Post Office rooftop is clad with a combination of a slate roof and TPO membrane, which supports a copper-domed wood cupola adorned with a historic wood weathervane, trim, swags and windows. A combination of copper and aluminum skirts and flashing details trim the roofline with snow guards and copper grates dotting the edges. Wagner reviewed the original construction methods and determined the copper wedge angles could be used to create a template for the new copper dome, which would match the dimensions and seams of the original. In addition to the craftsmanship required to match the angle and seams of the original copper, Wagner’s team needed to pre-bend the wedges to match the curve of the dome, resulting in a smooth copper surface area. Had this approach been executed in any other way, hammer marks from the in-place bends and seam edges would have been visible and the copper dome would have appeared damaged. Access to the roof work was challenging and constrained, with the full building encased in scaffolding for the façade restoration work. The work areas were accessed at the northwest façade scaffolding via a series of ladders and staging platforms. Once on the roof, the surface area was sectioned into work zones and access points to accommodate the staging.

Scaffolding & Rigging

Deybi Andrade, Antoine Boykins, Benji Coffey, Ron McKinney, Robinson Whitaker, Dennis Wilson - J.D. Belfield Enterprises, LLC

Project Name: National Air and Space Museum Revitalization,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Quinn Evans Architects
Engineer:  Patuxent Engineering Group, LLC
General Contractor:  Clark/Smoot/Consigli, A Joint Venture
Taking on a major 6-year renovation of the museum and keeping its doors open throughout, redefines the term challenging. Approaching a scope that requires the development of 100% weatherproof enclosures to be erected over large skylights that are to be demolished and replaced, all while structural upgrades, MEP, and stone replacement work is to take place concurrently below requires a “BIG” solution. The large tent or roof like structures that you see are Temporary Roof Enclosures or in short, a TRE. What can be difficult to appreciate from afar is that these systems were designed and installed to accommodate continuous restoration efforts underneath by providing roof-like protection from high winds, rain, and snow to the museum all while being completely temporary and non-invasive. Of the 3 TRE configurations that this building will require, the largest provides the most complete picture of what it takes to provide protection from the elements, continued occupancy, and superior material handling solutions to a variety of scopes of work all at the same time.
Star Award Nominee

Ming Chen, John "Chip" Daley Jr., Russ Dusek, Dave McIntyre - IWEISS Holdings, LLC

Project Name: National Air and Space Museum Artifact Move & Logistics Coordination Services,  Washington, DC
Engineer:  Multiple Companies
General Contractor:  Clark/Smoot/Consigli, A Joint Venture
During the Phase 1 deinstallation, NASM artifact logistics and move team has over 1900 difficult and unique artifacts to dismantle and relocated during the. One of the most treasured objects was the Skylab Command 4 Module. This object was suspended from structural steel that was located beneath the third-floor structure in one of the second-floor galleries. Prior to this artifact being lowered there were 209 other artifacts within this same gallery that had to be disassembled, packaged and shipped of site to a NASM facility. After the 209 artifacts were removed, we also had to strategically remove existing exhibit cases, ceilings and walls that were within inches of the suspended Skylab. The planning of the rigging took 7 months to plan and 3 days to execute on site. We had to bring in a specialty stand that is known as a tipping fixture similar to what NASA would have used and attach it to the bottom of the artifact all while both the artifact and tipping fixture were being suspended.
Star Award Nominee

Walter Aristondo, Benji Coffey, Brett Friedel, Aric Guttry, Mamerto Hernandez, Robinson Whitaker - Scaffold Resource, LLC

Project Name: Restoration of the Jefferson Memorial,  Washington, DC
Architect:  GWWO Architects
Engineer:  Patuxent Engineering Group, LLC
General Contractor:  Grunley Construction Company
Scaffold Resource is working on this project revolves around providing access to the restoration efforts through the rehabilitation of the existing stone by way of the removal of biofilm, re-pointing of stone joints, and various other historical preservation efforts. Approaching the Memorial from the East you can just make out, a runway that Scaffold Resource installed to allow for the movement of heavy stones and cleaning equipment on an off of the Memorial. Following the material hoist up to the dome level you will be able to see the dome scaffold. The design and installation of this access scaffold system was custom in every aspect of the word. As you approach the front steps of the Memorial from the West you will be able to see the access scaffold that was installed at the Northwestern most point of the Colonnade. The last portion of our work can be seen in erection as you are walking up the front steps to the Memorial. You will notice that access scaffold has been built along the perimeter of the Portico for restoration access.



Architectural Millwork

Santana Brown, Carlos Escobar, Joan (Manny) Freitez, Eduardo Peraza, Jose Quezada, Miguel Sabillon - ISEC, Inc.

Project Name: National Museum of the United States Army,  Ft. Belvoir, VA
Architect:  Skidmore, Owings & Merrill
General Contractor:  Clark Construction Group, LLC
Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP (SOM) had a nuanced and technically demanding design for the architectural millwork at the National Museum of the United States Army. At the entrance to the lobby is the Information Desk, which ISEC installed. The Information Desk is approximately 14' x 17' and serves as the central interface with museum patrons. The Information Desk is clad with stainless steel, with #6 long grain polish to match the exterior facade. Over 25 conduit stub ups were required to provide audiovisual, power, telecom, and security services to the different work stations and exhibit features. lSEC coordinated the location of conduits and provided pathways throughout the desk for all systems. Surrounding the lobby are three pavilions and the Exhibit Hall. Each space is connected by thresholds. Part of SOM's design was creating beautiful millwork clad thresholds that signify the transition from one space to another. Initially, there were plans to construct the millwork fins out of aluminum extrusions clad in wood veneer. However, ISEC identified several technical challenges that ultimately led the team to embrace wood veneer supported by steel trusses.

Phil Burgess, Mun Hwan Chang, Peter Harp, Yong Bum Lee, Charles Neal, Eric Ortiz - ibs Millwork, LLC

Project Name: Carnegie Library Renovation,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Beyer Blinder Belle
Engineer:  Limbach Company, LLC
General Contractor:  Grunley Construction Company
As well as appearing to be part of the original building, the new millwork elements needed to incorporate design features necessary to accommodate the mechanics of modern buildings such as air movement grills in stained hardwood and paint grade base moldings that matched existing moldings or blended into ogee column bases as well as air movement ducts concealed within new millwork elements. Other examples of blending the new into the old are; arched lacquered portals situated within ceiling and columns of existing tile and plaster crown and base, old school wainscot with raised panels and Federal style pediments located against exterior windows that coordinated with “heralds” on the exterior of the building and also served to conceal steam radiators which necessitated built in heat shields to protect the millwork and oak wood raised panel and molding surrounds at deep window niches that again matched existing molding features.

Tai Pham, Michael Pullen, Anthony Quaranto, Sing Rattana, Jim Viles, Bert Ward - Jefferson Millwork & Design

Project Name: CGI Headquarters,  Fairfax, VA
Architect:  FORM Architects
General Contractor:  Harvey-Cleary Builders
The 1st floor reception feature wall ceiling is comprised of an array of differently dimensioned wood veneer panels that vary in and out of plane creating a 3-dimensional feature. Each panel is supported by corresponding blocking/framing cut to the same angle and plane. Creating the computer model of this element was a careful process to ensure the angles at which the panels intersect met smoothly. The light fixture that hangs from the feature ceiling was installed in coordination with the millworker as each cluster met the panels at a different height above floor. Typical floors millwork ceilings were drawn in AutoCAD, with "stencils" cut out for the entire plan of the ceiling. These stencils were cut and measured based off of field measurements, and then laid out on the floor. These wooden stencils served as an installation road map for the millwork crew as it laid out where each specific element of the ceiling is to go.

Joel Cabanban, Brian Cross, Kenneth Edwards, Wes Hamby, Mike Lee, Mike Stockenberg - Gaithersburg Architectural Millwork

Project Name: Wiehle,  Reston, VA
Architect:  SK+I Architecture
General Contractor:  LCP Contractors - Lincoln Property
There are many different types of materials used in this project, however each piece works to complement each other admirably. For example, located on the main floor, the eight foot high curved die wall, that is wrapped with blue Spinneybeck leather, pairs nicely with the adjacent business library that is made up of quartered walnut veneer. The bookcases in that library proved to be one of the biggest challenges of this project. Special attention to details was the key to getting every dimension down to their precise measurements. Each shelving was individually measured out at different depths, widths and heights and then carefully aligned with the walnut veneer face frame to ensure perfect unity throughout the casework. The casing included open cabinets, glass cabinet doors, displays, veneer and glass shelving that was intricately placed together by the designers.

George Bowling, Justin Crouse, Archie Dodson, Paul Francioli, Anthony Orr, Steven Spurling - Gaithersburg Architectural Millwork

Project Name: McKinsey & Company,  Washington, DC
Architect:  OTJ Architects
General Contractor:  HITT Contracting
The McKinsey project walls are wrapped with panels or cabinetry, and almost the entire ceiling has panels. Adding to the paneling, we incorporated metal trim pieces as the reveals as well as a hardwood strip that was incorporated in the elevations. The wall panels travel across the project, starting in the 10th floor lobby and moving up the stairs to the 11th floor plaza where they end wrapped around a countertop. The paneling and different elevations were difficult to lay out and line up in with one another. A great deal of engineering and drafting time was used to carefully line up with all millwork as well as other trades such as sprinklers, and lighting. In addition to the paneling, we worked around a double sided fireplace near the pantry. One side called for incorporated paneling while on the other we engineered and installed a flip-down Batista countertop into the wall panels. The stone backsplashes in the room tie together nicely with the rest of the millwork.

Jonathan Bowser, Mike Johnson, Daniel Valencia - Allegheny Millwork

Project Name: Great American Restaurant - Tyson's Corner,  Vienna, VA
Architect:  Streetsense
General Contractor:  Forrester Construction Company
The millwork subcontractor on this building deserves particular praise for their quality, commitment to meeting schedule milestones, and attention to detail demanded by an exacting client. The project has a multitude of materials, techniques, and styles. Jointing and transition details are varied and prevalent through this space. The volume of work was significant, and many areas were so expansive that work was performed 30' off the ground. Working at such heights can be logistically challenging and requires consideration in the schedule. Lifts and scaffolding were employed to facilitate the flow of materials to workers. The height also required a high level of attention to safety; for example, it was essential that workers were tied off and following appropriate protocols. More than 30 millworkers were on-site at various points of the project with large crews for extended periods.

Adolph Bethea, Cary Dettra, Tim Eastman, Julio Arbaiza Flores, Orlando Greene, Joseph Yonkoski - Worcester Eisenbrandt

Project Name: Arlington House, The Robert E. Lee Memorial Preservation,  Arlington, VA
Architect:  GWWO Architects
General Contractor:  W. M. Schlosser Company
The work on the windows, shutters and doors at the Arlington house was conducted in a manner that is rarely seen in typical construction projects. Prior to any work taking place each window/ shutter and door was surveyed, catalogued and numbered. Off-site restoration of windows included the removal of all glazing compound and paint from the sash, salvage of historic glass. Repairs to the wood ranged from epoxy/consolidant applications, dutchman replacement, and whole component replacement. Restoration of shutter and doors included removal of paint, epoxy/consolidant repairs and dutchman repairs. Transparent finished doors were touched up or refinished using a traditional tung oil system. New fabrication of windows in the north slave quarters and museum building was done to replicate historic profiles and dimensions. New doors at the slave quarters and mansion conservatory were fabricated to match historic profiles.

Nelson Delgadillo, Carlos Gomez, Frank Hockman, Mike Reiff, Arunas Sopa, Hung Vo - Gaithersburg Architectural Millwork

Project Name: Portals V,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Robert A.M. Stern Architects, LLP
General Contractor:  Balfour Beatty
The first thing you will notice when walking in the main entry is the six fluted European Oak columns. They are 32” in diameter and over 13-feet tall. These are column covers, therefore they had to be split and re-glued. The final cutting of the split columns had to be performed in the field. Once the columns were cut in half they needed to be wrapped around the steel beam and quickly glued back together to prevent movement and misalignment. The 373-unit entries were designed to install quickly in two phases. The first phase was installed after prime paint and included wood blocking and clips. The second phase consisted of installing the finish panels on the clips after the carpet and other finishes were complete. Installing the finish panels after the flooring and other finishes minimized the repair and touch-up work required on the panels.
Star Award Nominee

Maximo Garcia, Patricio Garcia, Liliana Haskins, Bruno Montano, Walter Rivera - Potomac Architectural Millwork

Project Name: West Half,  Washington, DC
Interior Design Architect:  ODA
Interior Architect:  V Starr Interiors
General Contractor:  HITT Contracting
Potomac Architectural Millwork furnished and installed the millwork at the WH2 lobby, WH3 lobby, and the WH3 penthouse lounge. All three areas required a great amount of coordination, craftsmanship, and ingenuity due to the unique designs proposed by the architects. Upon entering the WH2 lobby, one's attention is immediately drawn to the multi-dimensional silkscreen feature wall. The silkscreen dot pattern was carefully coordinated with the layout of individual MDF panels, as well as the projecting light boxes along the wall. In addition to the feature wall, Potomac provided the millwork at the lobby desk, which includes the hammered copper that surrounds the lobby desk planter. The WH3 lobby contains a unique, curved marble saw tooth feature wall that separates the concierge area from the mailroom, as well as walnut wall panels lining the concierge area extending all the way to the elevator lobby and restroom, and a millwork desk—all furnished and installed by Potomac.

Brian Cummings, Mike Dailey, Frankie Jordan, Tony Maldonado - Washington Woodworking Company

Project Name: Host Hotels and Resort HQ,  Bethesda, MD
Architect:  Gensler
Engineer:  KTA Group
General Contractor:  rand* construction corporation
This project consists of the blend of twenty-six different millwork materials with a multitude being fabricated and installed at random angles. The matching of the Santos Rosewood Veneer panels with horizontal grain that flows from room to room required special care and coordination with regard to layout, establishing of benchmarks that run through partitions and floors, and the means and methods of installation. The fabricating and installing the slat panels with full width slats only in each elevation was also another unique challenge present on this project. The subcontractor’s finishing department was challenged to keep consistent a natural wood veneer in color and pattern with compound miters even as it runs from room to room or the finishing of solid wood and veneer in the same elevation while keeping the characteristics of solid oak, the grain and the open pours.

Pat Kelly, James Maldonado, Tony Maldonado - Washington Woodworking Company

Project Name: Akin Gump,  Washington, DC
Architect:  Gensler
General Contractor:  rand* construction corporation
The extensive use of custom materials and detailed design for precise alignments made almost every work scope installation a collaborative process due to joint and equipment placements affecting the alignments of other scopes. Basic changes in the field, such as a header moving a couple inches, required coordination meetings with all critical subcontractors to ensure material fabrication and installation conformed to the new benchmarks. Along with a streamlined communication approach, the use of the preconstruction period for developing full scale mock-ups for major design elements, the private offices acting as a prime example, proved to be critical for operational success. This allowed all major trades to develop an efficiency prior to mobilization to help quicken the pace of construction. The new Akin space is a model to the advantages of a collaborative approach.